Posts tagged with "Jaxson Skovlund"

Father and Kids illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Outdoors for Father’s Day

5 Reasons to Get Dad Outdoors More This Father’s Day

The Fishing Caddy, the world’s first all-in-one fishing system, helps make it more enjoyable for dads to enjoy the outdoors

If asked, most dads would say they would love to spend more time outdoors. Yet there are many things that keep them from being able to. Whether it’s the time they are spending at work, things that have to be done around the house, or life that gets in the way, they often don’t get as much time enjoying the great outdoors as they would like to. This Father’s Day, make it a point to help Dad get more time outside. Doing so comes with a host of benefits.

“One of the great things about The Fishing Caddy is that it helps make getting outside to fish easier,” explains Joe Pippins, creator and founder of The Fishing Caddy. “Whatever we can do to help people get outside and enjoy being in nature, the better off everyone will be. There are a lot of benefits to spending time in nature.”

Due to the pandemic, many people are changing how they entertain, and the types of activities they get involved in. Fishing makes for a good option, because it’s affordable and helps you naturally practice social distancing. By getting dads outside more this Father’s Day and all summer long, they will experience numerous benefits. There are many research studies that demonstrate the variety of benefits that people obtain from spending time in nature, even if it’s for short amounts of time.

Here are five reasons to get Dad outdoors more this summer:

  1. Reduce stress. A study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology reports that there is growing evidence that exposure to natural environments can be associated with mental health benefits. It also reports that spending time outdoors can help with reducing stress and combating depression and anxiety.
  2. Boost memory and cognition. In another study in the same journal, researchers conducted an experiment with over 500 people and found that spending time out in nature improved cognitive performance. Essentially, spending time outdoors helps to clear the mind and help people think better.
  3. Increase happiness. When dad gets to spend more time outdoors, he will end up feeling happier. Research shows that spending time outside improves mood, which is something the whole family can benefit from.
  4. Improve health. A study published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine found that time spent outdoors increases physical activity, which helps to reduce the risk of chronic health conditions. By spending some time out in nature, families can help Dad to get healthier.
  5. Change it up. Over the last year, people have spent far too much time indoors. The pandemic had people changing their routines and often staying indoors. It’s time to get Dad outside for a while. A change of scenery will do everyone good.

“Just about anyone who spends time outdoors and especially fishing can attest to the fact that it helps you in many ways,” added Pippins. “Fishing gives you a way to relax, connect with nature, reduce stress, and just enjoy the moment. Our goal with The Fishing Caddy is to help families make it easier to get Dad outside this Father’s Day. He will thank you!”

Often times, people don’t know what to buy dad for Father’s Day. Rather than spend time trying to figure it out and running around getting items in different stores, The Fishing Caddy makes gift giving simple. It comes with everything dad needs to get fishing, including:

  • 1 padded swivel seat (place to sit comfortably) 
  • 2 built-in rod holders (place to put his rods safely) 
  • 2 ultra-bright LED lights for tying knots and revisiting at night
  • 1 XL Beverage Holder 

It’s everything dad will need to relax, catch fish, and enjoy a peaceful day of family time with his loved ones. Mothers, wives and female family members are the catalyst to finding unique gifts that bring families together, and that’s what will happen when you get him The Fishing Caddy.

Those looking for a great Father’s Day activity this year may want to consider planning a special day outdoors for Dad. Pack a picnic lunch and find a spot near a lake or on a boat, where Dad can enjoy the time outdoors. Surprise him with The Fishing Caddy to top the experience off. This will motivate him to get outside more all summer long. The Fishing Caddy makes a great gift because it will help ensure that fishing trips are less stressful and will be enjoyed more because it’s been designed for organization and to improve the anglers’ experience.

The Fishing Caddy is an all-in-one system that people can easily take with them to go fishing. The system has been designed to help ensure that fishing trips are stress-free, simple, and easy to do. This increases the enjoyment level and makes people want to go more often. The product can be found online, as well as in over 3,800 locations of its newest partners, Walmart and Do It Best hardware stores. It was voted Top Made in the USA Outdoor Gift of 2017, beating out larger competition due to its novelty and modern design. The Fishing Caddy also comes with a two-year warranty.

The Fishing Caddy, which ranges in price from $69.95 to $129, was expertly designed for all types of fishing, and can be used by anglers of all ages. The caddy also comes with a 60-day money-back guarantee. The organization system gives people everything they need for a great fishing experience. The fishing system has been designed to help make fishing more enjoyable, and give people more time to fish, rather than track down and organize their tackle and supplies. To see a video of The Fishing Caddy benefits, visit: The Fishing Caddy on YouTube.

The Fishing Caddy is trusted by many large retailers and consistently earns a 5-star review from those who have tried it out. It can be found online, as well as at  Walmart, Do it Best, Ace Hardware, Bass Pro Shops, Cabela’s, and Scheels locations, and at the company website.

About The Fishing Caddy

The Fishing Caddy is the world’s first all-in-one fishing system. Created by Joe Pippins, the caddy offers anglers an easy and simplified way to head out fishing. Features on the caddy include two rod holders, a cup holder, live well for storing fish, tackle box, and a padded seat option. Pippins also offers business consulting services for those who would like guidance on product launches and business development. For more information, visit the site at: https://thefishingcaddy.com.

Child illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Child Friendly Faith Project

Child Advocacy Group Highlights Abuse in Religious Institutions for Child Abuse Prevention Month

With National Child Abuse Prevention Month underway, the Child-Friendly Faith Project (CFFP), a national nonprofit that educates the public about religiously enabled child maltreatment, is raising awareness of crimes against children perpetrated in religious institutions.

The CFFP is also drawing attention to a dangerous court decision that could prevent abusive institutions from being held accountable and offering a valuable resource to parents and guardians to help them determine whether they should enroll or continue to enroll their children in certain religious institutions.

The little-known ecclesiastical abstention doctrine (EAD) guides courts in deciding First Amendment, religious matters. While historically the EAD has been raised in cases relating to claims of wrongful termination, in recent years religious schools facing lawsuits involving allegations of child harm have pushed courts to interpret the EAD very broadly to get cases dismissed. In one recent case, the Episcopal School of Dallas was permitted to ignore its own legal contracts with parents and the emotional harm suffered by a child never came to light.

Given this alarming legal precedent, parents and guardians of children who have been harmed by private institutions could lose their right to seek relief in court, while the institutions might never be held accountable.

Parents who have children enrolled in private, faith-based schools (or are considering enrolling them) should be aware of the potential harm posed by the EAD. With this in mind, CFFP’s campaign is offering parents valuable tips on how to determine whether they should enroll (or continue to enroll) their children in private, faith-based schools:

  • Determine whether the institution your child is enrolled in (or might be enrolled in) could claim to be faith-based. Some private schools have stretched the meaning of “faith-based” as a way to be shielded by the EAD in court. Even if an institution seems to operate in a way that appears secular, as long as a facility, school, program, or daycare operation can claim that it has some sort of faith-based or spiritual component, it could convince a court that it should be protected by the EAD and cannot be sued for child abuse or neglect.
  • Read the school’s contract carefully. Many schools specify in their contracts how legal issues must be resolved. For example, some require parents to agree to mediation. It’s important to know what legal recourses you’re agreeing to. However, be aware that if a case goes to court, the EAD does have the potential to make contracts of religious school’s moot.
  • Ask to see a school’s child-abuse prevention policies & procedures. Those that take abuse seriously and proactively develop and enforce comprehensive abuse-prevention policies are usually open to making these policies available and may even post them on their websites.
  • Research whether the school has a history of abuse allegations. Conduct an online search using the name of the institution and words such as “lawsuit,” “sued,” and “abuse” to determine if it has been accused of abuse or of covering up cases in the past. Be extremely wary if you find a pattern of abuse allegations, even if you do not find information about final court decisions.
  • Explore the educational programs of secular private or public schools. Children can receive a high-quality education and experience at many different types of schools. Consider the offerings of private secular schools or public schools, which would be unable to raise the EAD in court.

Recent abuse cases

The CFFP has previously exposed issues of religious institutional child abuse and offered support to survivors and affected families. An example is its efforts to make public the decades-long, egregious abuses perpetrated at Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch. Recently, other cases have also made the news:

  • Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) — Last February, the SBC’s executive committee voted to expel two member churches for employing pastors who were convicted sex offenders. One pastor, who had been with his church since 2014, had pleaded guilty to two counts of statutory rape of a minor in the 1990s. The other pastor led his church since 2018, despite having been on Florida’s sex offender registry since 1993. In 2019, the SBC published a report on preventing and responding to cases of sexual abuse and later launched its “Caring Well Challenge” that calls on all SBC churches to adopt the report’s recommendations. Unfortunately, the program is voluntary.
  • Circle of Hope Girls Ranch — The owners and operators of this faith-based boarding school in Missouri face more than 100 criminal charges of sexual, physical and mental abuse of girls in their care. Their arrests came after their estranged daughter, Amanda Householder, posted social media videos of former residents talking about the abuse they endured. In an interview with a Missouri TV station, Householder said that victims had been speaking out since 2007. “Why did it take ten years for anyone to do anything?” she asked.

A dangerous court decision

While it’s heartening that these cases are receiving public attention, it is possible that they, and many more like them, could be dismissed thanks to a legal precedent set by a Texas appellate court in 2018. The case involved the Episcopal School of Dallas which invoked a common-law doctrine known as the “ecclesiastical abstention doctrine” (EAD). The EAD provides guidance to courts when weighing in on First-Amendment, religious matters. However, in the Dallas case, in which a father alleged that his son had been wrongfully expelled and in violation of school policy, it was applied very broadly and used to shield the school from being sued.

In another case involving Trinity Episcopal School in Galveston, Texas, a district court, in recognizing the EAD, threw out a lawsuit filed by a mother whose son had endured repeated racist bullying by other students. The mother wanted the school to hold the perpetrators accountable after the school had only demanded a written apology and suspended them for one day. Despite emotional trauma suffered by the victim, the judge agreed with the school’s claim that a court should not “intrude upon a religious institution’s management of its internal affairs and governance.”

“The EAD allows courts to prioritize a religious institution’s desire for secrecy and avoidance of accountability over the wellbeing of children,” said CFFP founder Janet Heimlich. “In cases in which organizations invoke the EAD, the public may never learn what abusive or neglectful actions took place, and parents may unwittingly enroll their children in those schools.”

To schedule an interview with a representative of the CFFP, an affected parent or a survivor of religious institutional child abuse, contact Jeff Salzgeber  through email or (512) 743-2659 cell.

The Child-Friendly Faith Project (CFFP) is a national, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that seeks to end religious child maltreatment by raising awareness of this issue through educational programs that benefit the general public, survivors, professionals, and faith communities.

Children traveling illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Luxury Travel Safety Study

MEDJET AND WORTH MEDIA RELEASE RESULTS OF LUXURY TRAVEL SAFETY STUDY

Poll Reveals “Massive Misconceptions Among Business and Leisure Travelers of All Ages as to: If, When and How They’re Protected.”

A new study from Medjet, the industry leader in air medical transport and travel security memberships for travelers, and WORTH Media, a leading financial, wealth management and lifestyle media company, finds that a major segment of today’s luxury travel market – both business and leisure – continues to be ill-informed about travel insurance, medical evacuation and personal protection.

The most recent Medjet/WORTH Media poll, which builds on a study originally conducted pre-COVID-19 in fall 2019, was completed in early 2021 to more accurately gauge travelers’ sentiments after such a tumultuous year for the global travel industry. Both times, the results illustrated a significant lack of awareness in regard to travel insurance and medical evacuation coverage, even more so during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The new poll results show that very few travelers plan on sitting this year out; when asked when they would feel ready to travel again, travelers’ responses were as follows:

  • 17.5% are already traveling
  • 15.83% plan on traveling within the next three months
  • 54.17% plan on traveling between 4-12 months from now
  • 12.5% plan on traveling 1+ year from now/are not sure

“The results of both polls are very much in line with what we’ve found in our own anecdotal research and decades of experience as leaders in the field of air medical transport and crisis response,” says Mike Hallman, President & CEO of Medjet, “that there are massive misconceptions among business and leisure travelers of all ages as to: If, when and how they are protected.”

In 2020, 85% of respondents felt they knew about the “same or less” about medevac coverage due to the pandemic. 64% of travelers felt they should know more.

The fall 2019 poll results, even without the threat of COVID-19, showed overwhelmingly that illness was a top traveler concern, and if hospitalized overseas, people would prefer to get home to their own hospital for treatment and recovery. Therefore, continuing to educate people as to the where travel insurance’s medevac coverage leaves off, and transport memberships like Medjet pick up, remain important. 


Both studies targeted professionals across the country whose household’s net worth was valued at $1,000,000 and above. The original Medjet/WORTH poll assessed travelers’ understanding of their health, travel or business insurance coverages, and credit card travel program benefits, finding that nearly two-thirds of respondents who reported being “concerned about their health while traveling” were unaware of the inclusions (and perhaps more importantly exclusions) in their plans or benefits packages. Some of the study’s major findings include:

  • Only 35% of travelers who reported being concerned about their health and well-being while traveling were aware that their health, travel or business insurance, or credit card travel benefits, could ONLY get them to the “nearest acceptable facility.” 65% mistakenly believed their coverage would automatically get them all the way to a hospital at home, or were not sure.
  • While illness and injury were top concerns for travelers, only 34% of business travelers concerned about their health had ever looked into the conditions of their company’s travel and medical evacuation policies.
  • Of those with corporate coverage, one in three respondents (33%) expected that, one way or another, their company would get them home if they became ill or were hospitalized while traveling. “For many companies, that means footing a $30,000 – $180,000 out-of-pocket bill, or potentially falling short on employee ‘duty of care’ expectations,” noted Hallman, “which can present a significant financial and legal risk to an organization.”
  • Of those who reported being self-employed and traveling for business frequently, 77% reported never purchasing travel insurance.
  • Younger respondents proved even less knowledgeable about what their health and travel insurance, or credit card travel benefits would do for them if they needed a medical evacuation; 86% believed it would transport them back to their hospital at home or were unsure.

“The greatest misconception among high-net-worth travelers is that, in the unforeseen event they were to end up hospitalized while out of town – be it in Peoria or Paraguay – they believe their basic travel coverage through a company plan, travel insurance or credit card would get them home,” said Hallman. “More often than not, that is not the case, which is why we see so many stories in the news about travelers stuck abroad, and why so many individuals, families, corporations and organizations (like the NFL) enroll in our membership program.”

“On the bright side,” said Hallman, “we found that 86% of business travelers were interested in purchasing additional medical evacuation coverage that got them all the way home, and 68% of business travelers were interested in purchasing travel security coverage in addition to the coverage offered by their company. So, it looks like there’s plenty of continued growth to look forward to here at Medjet!”

For more information about Medjet, please visit the Medjet website.