Posts tagged with "robot"

ROBOT DIGIT LEARNS PAINTING via 360 magazine

ROBOT DIGIT LEARNS PAINTING

Robots have been given the gift of human creativity. 

Artist Agnieszka Pilat is currently out West at the headquarters of Agility Robotics, where she has made a new friend with the humanoid robot DIGIT, and started a series of paintings with him that will be included in her upcoming show, ROBOTa. 

“This is the era of the new, intelligent machine,” says Agnieszka. “The works created by DIGIT are full of mistakes. This innocence in mark-making gives them a sense of spontaneity, like children playing with crayons.”  

Watch DIGIT paint here

Agnieszka is no stranger to painting with robots. She has worked closely with Boston Dynamics‘ SPOTselling one piece created by the robot canine for $40,000 during a fundraiser to benefit Ukrainian refugees. The pieces with DIGIT and SPOT will be featured in Agnieszka‘s upcoming fall show at the gallery Modernism in San Francisco. 

Agnieszka’s Talking Points: 

  • This is the era of the new, intelligent machine. This is not a printer – an enhancement of a human hand, or a camera lens – an amplified human eye. The new machine is close to man’s nature – interested in the sublime, the essence of what it means to be human. It’s slow and curious and playful. Unlike clean, perfect classical machine esthetics, new machine esthetics are fraud with errors and imperfections.
  • If a human is the ideal – then robots strive to imitate their human creators. We are the parents to the machine – and intelligent machines like proper children believe in their naivete, that they can someday surpass their creators.
  • The new machine is close to man’s nature – interested in the sublime, the essence of what it means to be human. It’s slow and curious and playful. Unlike clean, perfect classical machine esthetics, new machine esthetics are fraud with errors and imperfections.

Agnieszka Pilat Bio: 

Polish born artist, Agnieszka Pilat studied painting and illustration at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, CA. She is an award-winning artist and her works can be found in public and private collections in the United States, Poland, and Canada. Pilat currently lives and maintains a full time studio in San Francisco and is represented by numerous galleries throughout the United States and has exhibited at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

Photos from Kroy's exhibition via Big Hassle Media for use by 360 Magazine

KROY – ANIMACHINA

Earlier this year, multi-disciplinary recording artist KROY teamed up with The PHI Centre in Montreal to turn her music into a live performance art piece entitled ANIMACHINADuring this residency, Jonathon Anderson at the Creative School of Ryerson University programmed three robot arms to play music and mirror KROY‘s movements, to tell a communal story that blurs the line between man and machine and what interpersonal connection looks like in the modern world. Today, KROY releases a seven-part video series for ANIMACHINA. Watch HERE.

In these videos, KROY strips down her hyper-pop and hyper-sensitive sound, to showcase her vocals in a truly haunting way. Performing alongside a robot, she leaves viewers feeling entranced and unsettled as she tackles topics like love and violence. Working through the seven videos, KROY performs recent songs like “Ryan Atwood,” teases upcoming releases, and interweaves a storyline that tethers the series together.

On ANIMACHINA, the PHI Centre said, “These monster-machines, with unforgivable tentacles, perform choreographic movements with surgical precision. In unison, they strum, modulate the artist’s voice on pedals and document the scene themselves. The danger, inherent in this dance of death where a single coordination error can lead to a fatal accident, allows KROY and his team to touch the sublime. Because it is with the machines that she finds comfort and that she fully vibrates.”

These videos are a hint at what is to come from the avantgarde artist later this year as she closes one chapter of her artistry, and fiercely blows open the next.

ANIMACHINA PLAYLIST

performance ONE . approaching and becoming

performance TWO . trust and alter

performance THREE . gate and infiltrate

performance FOUR . translation and connection

performance FIVE . strong and tame

performance SIX . cycle and breath

performance SEVEN . love and violence

ABOUT KROY

Introspection. Lust for connection. Loneliness can transform you in many ways. Isolation will move you to places you never thought you could find yourself. Some would choose to wait for a human connection. Others would wish for rooms full of strangers. Social anxiety has pushed KROY in the direction of finding intimacy elsewhere. Finding comfort in the digital world, having rooted most of her personality in Myspace and Tumblr, KROY finds freedom online. Connecting with people she’ll never meet. Confessing secrets she’d never tell any physical being. Merging her obsession with robots with her musical abilities, a pandemic became a playground. Getting in contact with other creatives also in a state of emergency, a team was quickly formed. With consultants in AI, digital arts, physics and computer sciences. With Ryerson University’s Creative Lab supporting and hosting the project. With three KUKA arms ready to learn how to play live instruments. Ready to learn choreography and movements that match KROY’s.

ABB via Sassy Films for use by 360 Magazine

Selfridges Plastic Designs

The future of retail is being highlighted by an exciting 3D printing demonstration featuring an ABB robot in Selfridges, one of London’s premier department stores on Oxford Street. Throughout April, the demonstration will feature in a window display, with shoppers able to see an ABB robot 3D printing a variety of personalized designer objects made from Parley Ocean Plastic®—intercepted marine plastic debris collected from Parley’s Global Cleanup network.

The 3D printing demonstration is part of Selfridges’ SUPERMARKET concept, which challenges consumers to think about how the goods they purchase are produced and the impact of this production on the environment.

Marc Segura, ABB’s Robotics Division President, said, “While expanded choice is great for consumers, it also comes at a cost to the environment, with products and packaging often being discarded with little thought about where they end up or whether they get recycled.” He continued: “By re-using plastic from the world’s oceans to print designer objects, we help to highlight the important contribution of robots in creating the sustainable manufacturing processes central to a circular economy.”

Developed in partnership with environmental organization and global network Parley for the Oceans, and innovative design brand Nagami, the demonstration will use ABB’s simulation software, RobotStudio® and an IRB 6700 robot to create a variety of printed furniture, homeware and other objects made from Parley Ocean Plastic®. The robot will work with Nagami’s unique plastic extruder to print the objects which can be selected by customers on a screen and made to order on the premises.

Parley founder and CEO Cyrill Gutsch commented, “Parley Ocean Plastic® was invented to catalyze change in response to marine plastic pollution and the destruction of our oceans. Working with two industry leaders, ABB and Nagami, we can now print on demand anywhere in the world to turn a problem into a solution. Beyond the huge potential for reducing waste by printing directly inside retail locations like Selfridges, we want to use this technology to empower local communities across the globe—giving them the tools to turn local plastic pollution into business opportunities and useful objects. For the oceans, climate and life.”

As well as underlining the importance of eco-innovation, the demonstration will also help to highlight the wider potential of robotic automation in helping retailers attract customers into their stores. Robots are already being used in increasing numbers in inventory and delivery management and in-store services, with research organization Coherent Market Insights estimating a 30% growth in the uptake of robots in retail by 2028.

Marc Segura said, “The ability to introduce robots into their stores both behind and in front of the counter offers exciting opportunities for retailers. By using robots to handle in-store micro-fulfilment operations, staff can be released to people-facing roles, allowing them to focus more on providing customers with a better all-around experience. As demonstrated by the installation at Selfridges, robots can also be used on the shop floor to enable personalized production of goods at the point of consumption, adding a whole new dimension to the retail experience.”

This new customer segment broadens ABB’s portfolio as part of a wider strategy to accelerate expansion into new and high-growth segments including logistics, healthcare, and construction.

Science Tech by Gabrielle Archuletta for use by 360 Magazine

What’s New at CES

By: Skyler Johnson

The Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, showcased some of the world’s newest technologies, everything from medical devices to self-driving cars. These technologies and the companies behind them vary in size, from startups to massive corporations. They have displayed their newest products, unveiling prototypes for devices that may become essential in just a few years down the road. Here are just a few:

Health Products

The Fasteesh Y-brush, currently a medical device, revolutionizes teeth brushing. Because of the shape, the brush can clean teeth in ten seconds and is three times more effective than a typical toothbrush. Currently, this is being implemented in care facilities and retirement homes.

Japan’s Quantum Operations exhibited the first non-invasive glucose monitor. This changes the way in which diabetes patients measure their glucose and will reduce the repeated pains garnered by needles. The device is worn like a watch, reminiscent of an Apple Watch, and can record glucose levels in the body.

Hapbee’s device, worn like a necklace, influences mood. It uses ultra-low frequency magnetic waves to help the body in both relieving stress and gaining energy. It offers the same benefits as caffeine and melatonin without the harmful effects on the body.

Convenience

If you ever dreaded your alarm clock, Loftie has you covered. Their alarms aid in the process of sleep through implementing breathwork and soundbaths while awake, and white noises and nature sounds while asleep. The two-phase alarm system is designed to both get you out of bed and not leave you irritated through professionally crafted tones.

Ottonomy.io developed robots that allow for both indoor and outdoor deliveries to our doors. A contextual navigation system allows for the robot to safely traverse environments. Because it’s all-electric, the device is more sustainable than traditional delivery methods and is especially worth considering during ongoing supply chain issues and staff shortages.

Urban Canopee fights against the effects of climate change by creating a product that transforms plant life to act as natural umbrellas. The result is cooler urban environments, increased biodiversity, and improved air quality.

Gaming

Perfect for the metaverse, Shiftall creates technology to allow for an all-body VR experience. Not only will users be able to control virtual environments using their hands, but also their feet. The gaming potential with this expansion is limitless.

With the growth of e-sports, Glytch intends to create stadiums for the new sport. The company will open 32 e-sports venues across America and Canada in the next eight years. Each venue will be 90,000 to 120,000 square feet and the home stadium of a different team.

Vehicles

A new winter sport has arrived with the development of the Moonbike. A cross between a snowmobile and a motorcycle, they provide a unique way of traversing the show. They are also fully electric, silent, and much lighter than snowmobiles, helping to keep the mountains snowy for years to come.

CES introduced many sustainable vehicles. The Jeep Wrangler 4xe will be the first hybrid Jeep to enter the market. The Bobcat T7X is the first all-electric compact track loader. There are two new companies that are planning to launch electric vehicles: EdisonFuture and Fisker. The former will release electric solar trucks and delivery vans. The latter displayed the Fisker Karma, an all-electric SUV.

There are also innovations occurring in autonomous driving. Helm develops autonomous vehicles that allow for safer and more efficient autonomous driving for both SUVs and commercial trucks. John Deere announced the release of the first autonomous tractor to help farmers increase yield.

Conclusion

Overall, many exciting new innovations were exhibited during CES. While not all these products will reach a consumer base, it’s exciting to think of the potential benefit these technologies will deliver.

Autonomous Cars

Ready or Not, Autonomous Cars are Coming: We are well past the point of autonomous vehicles being a fad. With several production cars around the world already coming from the factory with partial automation features, manufacturers, ride sharing companies, and rental car companies are in an all-out race to lead innovation in autonomous vehicle technology. That intense competition will also lead many to take risks.

 

Auto Insurers Betting on Autonomous to Decrease Frequency of Accidents: Auto insurers have already begun factoring the growth of autonomous and semi-autonomous technologies, such as forward collision warning with autobrake, adaptive headlights, and blind spot assist into future claims projections. In general, the industry is betting on autonomous technology to ultimately decrease the frequency of accidents, but not the severity of accidents that do occur.

 

You Are Being Recorded: One of the most interesting implications of the autonomous vehicle movement on the P&C insurance industry is the vast amount of data that is being collected by these technologies. According to a new studyconducted by J.D. Power in collaboration with Miller Canfield and Mcity, nearly three fourths (74%) of consumers say they are willing to share autonomous vehicle data after a collision, potentially giving insurers broad access into the details surrounding a crash and the ability to expand the current telematics offerings they currently have in place, which offer discounts to safer drivers. According to J.D. Power data, these telematics-powered offerings have been associated with high levels of insurance customer satisfaction.