Posts tagged with "margarita"

cocktail illustration by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Margarita Day Drink Guide

Just in time for National Margarita Day, 1800 Tequilathe world’s most awarded tequila line introduces a delicious line up of 1800 The Ultimate Margarita, the #1 premium margarita that’s ready to serve!  Made with real tequila and the extract of lime, 1800 The Ultimate Margarita is available in refreshing flavors including Classic, Peach & Watermelon!  Perfect for any at-home celebration, all flavors are best enjoyed on the rocks and chilled/blended with ice. As a premium offering, 1800 The Ultimate Margarita is packaged in 1800 Tequila’s signature pyramid glass bottle.

If you’re looking to put a spin on the classic margarita, check out these cocktail ideas from 1800, all of which can also be made with their refreshing, new flavors below:

 

La Rita

2 oz 1800° Silver

1 oz Lime Juice

½ oz Agave Syrup

½ oz Fresh Squeezed Orange Juice

Combine all ingredients in a shaker, shake and strain into salted rocks glass. Garnish with a lime wedge.

La Rosita
2 oz 1800® Silver Tequila

1 oz Fresh Lime Juice

0.5 oz Curacao

0.5 oz Rosemary Honey Syrup

Rosemary Sprig

To make the rosemary honey, add 2 parts honey to 1 part water and let simmer with some rosemary for 3–5 minutes. Measure out all ingredients, add to a shaker with ice, and shake. Strain into a rocks glass over ice and garnish with a sprig of rosemary.

Rising Star

2 oz 1800® Silver Tequila

0.75 oz Lemon Juice

0.75 oz Simple Syrup

3–4 Whole Blackberries

5–6 Mint Leaves

Seltzer Water

Lightly muddle mint leaves and blackberries in a shaker or mason jar. Add lemon juice, simple syrup, tequila and ice, and shake for 10 seconds. Pour into a glass over ice and top with seltzer water. Garnish with fresh mint and a blackberry.

All of these recipes can also be made with 1800 Tequila’s deliciously dangerous margarita flavors:

1800 Tequila x Jarritos Tamarindo Tango Margarita 
Mix in fresh lime juice & Chile de Arbol and serve on the rocks with chile salt rim & lime wheel

1800 The Ultimate Margarita Original

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled and salted Margarita glass

1800 The Ultimate Margarita Peach

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled and salted Margarita glass

 1800 The Ultimate Margarita Watermelon

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled and salted Margarita glass

margarita mix by 1800 Tequila for 360 Magazine

margarita mix by 1800 Tequila for 360 Magazine

margarita mix by 1800 Tequila for 360 Magazine

JAJA Tequila by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Cocktail Recipes to Celebrate February 22nd

National Margarita day is NEXT WEEK, February 22! While this day of celebration might not take place in the traditional bar or club setting this year, that doesn’t mean an at-home fiesta isn’t off the table.

222 is an important number in Latino culture, representing that something good is coming your way. It also means to pay attention to important people around you and cultivate meaningful relationships.

Founded by Latino Harlem, NY native, Joe Cruz Jr., YaVe Tequila is the key to unlocking a guilt free laid-back drinking experience whether it is behind your camera on a Zoom with friends, or at a safe in-person setting. At only 60 calories a shot, unlike any other Tequila, YaVe offers a distinctly clean and ultra-smooth taste. Handcrafted and double-distilled with volcanic water, whether it’s sipped on the rocks or mixed in a drink, this smooth tequila will not disappoint.

Below are some festive drink recipes from YaVe that you can make to celebrate:

SKINNY MANGORITA

Ingredients:

  •   2 oz YaVe Mango Tequila (or YaVe Blanco tequila for a stronger punch)
  •   1 oz Mango Nectar
  •   1 oz Simple Syrup
  •   1 oz Lime Juice
  •   Soda Water
  •   Garnish with a slice of mango and lime

Preparation: Add all ingredients together EXCEPT soda water and shake in one glass. In another glass, pour the mixture over ice and then top it off with the soda water at the end for a refreshing drink!

LA BRIESA – JALAPENO MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 2 ounces YaVe Jalapeño Tequila
  • Muddled Red Peppers
  • 1 ounce Pineapple Juice
  • Lemon Juice
  • Lime Juice
  • Ice

Pro tip: Try adding Japanese shichimi or jalapeño salt for decoration and an extra kick!

TEQUILAJITO – TEQUILA MOJITO

Ingredients:

  • 2 ounces YaVe Coconut Tequila (or Blanco Tequila)
  • 1 ounce Pineapple Juice
  • .75 ounces Ginger Simple Syrup
  • 6 Mint Leaves
  • 4 Lime Wedges
  • Granulated Sugar
  • 1 dash of Fee Brothers W. Indies Orange Bitters
  • Mint Sprig Garnish
  • Ice

Pro tip: Muddle the mint, lime, and sugar first. Add remaining ingredients and shake with ice. Add bitters and garnish at the end.

Heat Up Your Weekend With These Tasty Cocktails For National Watermelon Day

CÎROC Watermelon Frosé

Ingredients

7 oz. Cîroc Summer Watermelon

24 oz. Cups of ice cubes

½ Bottle of pink Moscato (Pink)

.25 oz. Lime juice

22 oz. Watermelon flesh, seeds removed

Method:

-Puree Watermelon Flesh & Freeze into ice cubes

-Blend frozen watermelon cubes, lime juice, vodka & pink Moscato

-Serve in empty watermelon & garnish with mint

Note: Expect 10 minutes of prep and about 14 hours of freezing time

 

Summer Watermelon Sparkle

Ingredients:

.85 oz. Cîroc Summer Watermelon

.34 oz. Cranberry

Topped with Champaign

Method:

-Pour Cîroc Watermelon and cranberry into a flute glass

-Top with Champaign

-Garnish with a Watermelon skin twist

 

Watermelon Le Twist

Ingredients

Ingredients:

1.35oz. Cîroc Summer Watermelon

.68 oz. Lemonade

1.35 oz. Soda

.34 oz. Splash of Cranberry

Method:

-Pour the ingredients in a tall glass filled with cubed ice

-Garnish with a lime wheel, fresh watermelon wheel & sprig of fresh mint

 

CÎROC Watermelon Refresh Pitcher

Ingredients

8 oz. CîROC Summer Watermelon

16 oz. lemonade

8 oz. club soda

Glassware: Pitcher

Garnish: Lemon, wheel, mint or sliced watermelon

Preparation: Combine CîROC Summer Watermelon, lemonade and ice in a pitcher ,Stir until contents are well mixed, Top with club soda

 

Twisted Maria

Ingredients

6oz DeLeon Platinum tequila

4oz Watermelon Juice

12 Cherry tomatoes on Vine

4 oz Lime juice

4 tsp Agave

Glassware: Rocks Glass/Collins

Garnish: Lime Wedge and Tomato

Preparation: Mull 12 cherry tomatoes in a shaker. Blend 10-12 pieces of watermelon or 1oz of watermelon juice into shaker,Add in remaining ingredients and pinch of salt. Shake, strain and pour over ice

 

Sandia Margarita

Ingredients

1.5oz DeLeon Platinum tequila

.75 oz lime juice

.5 oz agave

3 large chunks of watermelon

Glassware: Margarita/Rocks Glass

Garnish: Watermelon cube, lime wheel & sprinkle of salt

Preparation: Shake all ingredients with ice & fine strain over fresh ice into a rocks glass

Camarena announcing partnership with 2019 Gold Cup

The huge biyearly international soccer championship, which will have its kick-off in LA on June 15th, heads to the greater NYC area on June 24th featuring the following double-header games:

Game Day Info

  • Date: Monday, June 24th 
  • Stadium: Red Bull Arena
  • City: Harrison, NJ 
  • Matchup and times: 
    • 4:30 pm ET: Bermuda vs Nicaragua
    • 7:00 pm ET: Haiti vs Costa Rica

Camarena’s award-winning tequila portfolio includes Silver, Reposado and the recently released Anejo expression. All of the tequilas are harvested by hand from 100% blue weber agave in Jalisco’s Arandas Highlands. Distilled through a proprietary method that blends traditional ovens and modern techniques, Camarena’s portfolio is one of the smoothest and best-tasting tequilas on the market and will be sure to impress any tequila enthusiast.

Camarena Margarita:

  • 2 parts Camarena Silver

  • ¾  part Simple Syrup / Agave Nectar

  • ¾  part Lime Juice

  • ½  part Triple Sec

1. Add ingredients into a shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously.

2. Strain into a glass filled with ice.

3. Garnish with a lime wedge (or fresh sliced jalapeños, if you want to spice it up).

Alcohol Brands from India That You Need to Try!

Are you someone who loves to experiment with taste, especially the taste of alcoholic beverages? If yes, we bet that after reading this article you will have a new list of alcohol brands from India to try next time.

Not many of you may know, but when it comes to alcohol brands, India is home to some of the top-selling brands across the world. Indian market in itself is one of the largest liquor markets in the world with plenty of brands coming up to meet the demands. Some of them have even gathered a significant fan base even in international regions.

Here are some of those top alcohol brands in India you should pick up for your next party. Take a look!

• Amrut Single Malt
If you haven’t tasted the single malt whiskey of Amrut, you are missing on something great. Best known for its amazing quality, Amrut Fusion Single Malt gives delicious notes of fresh fruit followed by a smoky finish. Prepared with a mix of unpeated Indian barley and peated Scottish barley, this single malt whiskey is aged in oak barrels. Interestingly, this brand was also listed as the world’s third finest whiskey by Jim Murray. All the more reason to try it soon, isn’t it?

• Rockdove
Though a new entrant but definitely a strong one on the list, Rockdove is a premium whiskey brand that offers exquisite flavours which are well suited for the sophisticated new generation. Manufactured by Hermes Distillery, Rockdove has started garnering a number of lovers in quite a short span of time. Be it its colour, aroma, fine aftertaste, everything about Rockdove will make you take another glass of this flagship whiskey and enjoy the evening a little more.

• Paul John Single Malt
Another award-winning whiskey brand, this Indian single malt by John Distilleries was launched in 2012 and has remained one of the popular alcohol brands in India. This single malt whiskey is prepared with 6-Row Barley which is specially grown in the foothills of Himalayas and matured enough to get the best taste. It comes in 7 variants include Brilliance, Edited, Bold, Classic Select Cask, Peated Select Cask, Kanya, Oloroso and Single Casks to suit your different tastes.

• DesmondJi
Made from blue-green agave sourced from the Deccan Plateau, DesmondJi is a homegrown liquor brand which would have been labelled as tequila if it were not for the geographical indication system associated with it. The brand offers five agave-based spirits, namely, Agave (100%), Agave (51%), Agave Gold with an oak finish, Margarita and Blue Margarita blend. If you are interested in tasting something authentic and Indian, DesmondJi is just for you.

• Solan No. 1
Brewed in the foothills of Himalaya by Mohan Meakin Limited, Solan No. 1 has been in the market for a long time. The whiskey was even listed among the best whiskeys across the world by Serge Valentin. Blended with mature Malt spirits, Solan No. 1 is aged in oak barrels and has a strong visual appeal and gives a delicious aroma of sweet malt and butterscotch. Not just this, the taste of this whiskey is quite different, smooth and pleasant which will easily make you its fan after just one drink.
Read it all? Well, then don’t forget to try them all when you party next time. And we bet that once you have relished the taste of these top alcohol brands in India, you will not want to go back to your old collection.

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”