Posts tagged with "machine"

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Boom: The Fourth Saxon State Exhibition

On Saturday, July 11th, the Fourth Saxon State Exhibition called Boom will open to celebrate 500 years of Saxony’s industrial heritage. The substantial website allows you to also virtually enjoy Saxony’s amazing tribute to its high-quality global brands and industrial culture.

The southwestern region of Saxony was one of the first and most important centers of European industrialization. To this day, Saxons’ self-image still rests on the triad of natural beauty, cultural wealth and a broad industrial base. It is the success of these brands and Saxony’s entrepreneurialism that has allowed Saxony to build its extraordinary musical, artistic and architectural culture.

From July 11 to the end of this year, the Audi Building in Zwickau will host the central exhibition of the Fourth Saxon State Exhibition, Boom, while six other cities in the region will host additional and important parts of the exhibition, including the AutoBoom in the August Horch Museum in Zwickau; the Machine Boom in the Chemnitz Industrial Museum; the Railway Boom in the Chemnitz-Hilbersdorf Railway (outdoors); the Coal Boom in the Mining Museum in the Ore Mountains; the Textile Boom in the Cloth Factory in the Gebr Pfau Grimmitschau in Grimmitschau; and the Silver Boom in the Research and Teaching Mine in Freiberg.

These six topics are fleshed out in important locations where that “Boom” was most evident.

  • Auto Boom. is located in the August Horch Museum in Zwickau, which is next to the central exhibition in the Audi Building. The Horch museum is where the first models from major global automotive brands, including Horch and Audi, rolled off the assembly and Zwickau later was the birthplace of the legendary Trabant. August Horch was the founder of the company that would become Audi.
  • Machine Boom. is located in the Chemnitz Industrial Museum, where machines (such as the filigree clockwork at Glashütte to the high-tech machine center) have been designed and produced for more than 200 years.
  • Railway Boom. is on the site of the Schauplatz Eisenbahn (Railway Museum Chemnitz-Hilbersdorf) where you can see the industrial networking of people, raw materials and products in an open-air museum between historic steam and diesel locomotives in the sooty atmosphere of a roundhouse.
  • Coal Boom. is shown in the mining museum in Oelsnitz / Erzgebirg or the Ore Mountains where the coal industry, which was fundamental for the economic development of south-west Saxony, takes a look into the future of energy supply.
  • Textile Boom. is located in the originally preserved cloth factory Gebr Pfau in Crimmitschau. The machines and looms, some of which are 100 years old, are presented in a factory that has not changed since the doors were closed.
  • Silver Boom. is located in the research and teaching mine, Silver mine Freiberg, and provides deep insights into the history of ore mining and shows what role current scientific research plays in resource technologies.

In addition to these six geographic locations, the central exhibition in the Audi Building presents Saxony’s 500-year industrial booms in six time periods.It tells of an eventful history of the hard-working people of an early industrialized region with historical documents, objects, technical devices, photographs and through films and valuable works of art and spectacular media installations. The first period of the five hundred years of industrial culture was the Silver Rush (1470-1813) when the discover of silver in the Ore Mountains set off a clamor for mining not only of silver but also tin and copper. It was an unprecedented boom and attracted people from all over Europe. Augustus the Strong used this incredible wealth to build up the coffers of his state, buy art and collect treasures from around the world to build Dresden into one of Europe’s glittering capitals of art and architecture.

The second period from 1763 to 1914 was the emergence of the textile industry and mechanical engineering which drove development in Saxony and around the world. In 1914, Saxony was the most industrialized state in the entire German Reich. There was a third period from 1831 to 1914 when there was a rapid development in technology, science and machines. The fourth period from the eve of WWI to the end of WWII is marked by groundbreaking inventions and unprecedented, industrially shaped and organized violence.

The fifth period from 1945 to 1995 includes the industrial culture of East Germany and the Trabant is a symbol of the East German economic system. It
focuses on the working world and everyday life of people up to the political turn as well as the breaks and opportunities and structural changes that the fall of the wall brought about. The final period from 2020 to the future is all about what is to come and the future of technology in Saxony. Positive developments are emerging from Saxony’s keen entrepreneurial spirit, innovations based on research and knowledge and the ability to constantly change.

It is appropriate that the Saxon state has chosen the Audi Building in Zwickau as the place for the central exhibition as this was an assembly hall of Auto Union AG from 1938. The Auto Union was the coming together of four independent Saxon car manufacturers: Audi, DKW, Horch and Wanderer. Audi’s logo of four interlocking rings represents these original four members of the Auto Union. Audi is actually a Latin derivation of Horch’s name which means hark or Audi in Latin.

The Audi Building as well as the museum for Horch in Zwickau are a worthy one hour and fifteen-minute drive from Leipzig or Dresden. Even if you cannot visit in person in 2020, the museums in each of the towns will always be there and there is a book on the exhibition that you can order online.

Learn more about Boom here.

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Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

LEMAITRE’s MACHINE

Norwegian-born, Los Angeles-based electronic duo Lemaitre returns with a new single, « Machine » and an early start on the festival season with performances this weekend at M3F in Phoenix, AZ and CRSSD in San Diego, CA. “Machine” – the duo’s first new offering since 2017’s Chapter One, which featured the hit single « Closer” feat. vocalist Jennie A. blends bright synth lines, jangly guitar riffs, and soaring melody into a sweetly wistful, indie-pop-inspired confection. Relationship issues send the track’s narrator into emotional overload and leave him yearning for a simpler, more mechanical existence. He pleads, “Every time that I try, I shut down/So can you please hit restart?”.

 

“The basis for the lyrics to the song was this thing my cousin used to say when he was little” notes Ketil Jansen, who founded Lemaitre with fellow producer/songwriter Ulrik Denizou Lund. “Every time he did something he wasn’t allowed to do, like play with matches or whatever, he’d always turn into a machine and walk out of the room all robot-like, saying « I’m a machine, I don’t have any feelings, you can’t yell at me.” It was the perfect defense”

 

“Machine” is the first in a series of new tracks from Lemaitre. Forthcoming singles “Control” “Little Things” and “Big” are the results of Lemaitre’s collaborations with producers Coucheron, Jerry Folk, Bearson and William Larsen, all of whom are also Norwegian artists living in L.A. The tracks will be released over the course of the year.

 

In addition to this weekend’s festival performances, the duo will play Sasquatch and numerous other festivals. See below for initial itinerary and follow Lemaitre for further announcements. Known for their incendiary live sets, such as their explosive appearance at Coachella 2016. Lemaitre constantly change up their show to specifically suit each audience and venue, typically bringing in a full band, sometimes with an entire horn section.

 

Lemaitre’s commitment to upending what’s expected of the musical experience dates back to their earliest days as a duo. After meeting at a party in Oslo and bonding over their love of the Chemical Brothers and Basement Jaxx, Lund and Jansen started making music as teenagers. In summer 2010, they had a major breakthrough when “The Friendly Sound” – their second-ever release – hit No. 1 on Hype Machine overnight. In early 2012, Lemaitre released the first EP in their Relativity series. Relativity 2 followed in May 2012 and reached No. 1 on the iTunes Electronic chart in the U.S. and Canada. Soon after their song “1:18” was used as in a 2014 ad for the Apple iPhone 5C, Lemaitre signed to Astralwerks and made the move to L.A.

 

Streams of the hit single “Closer” now exceed 50 million on Spotify. The track was heard in a Google phone commercial and used by Bose in various retail displays while “We Got U” appeared in the FIFA 2017 mobile app trailer. “Higher” featuring Maty Noyes, landed in an Apple Watch ad, was praised by Idolator as “a mind-bending banger”.

 

 

Download / Stream “Machine” HERE:

 

 

Lemaitre : 2018 Festival Dates : 

3/2 – Phoenix, AZ @ McDowell Mountain Music Festival

3/3 – San Diego, CA @ CRSSD Festival

4/28 – Jujutla, Mexico @ Festival Vaiven

5/25 – Sasquatch Music Festival @ The Gorge Amphitheatre

8/9 – Zambujeira do Mar, Portugal @ Meo Sudoeste Festival

8/11 – Budapest, Hungary @ Sziget Festival

8/18 – Bodø, Norway @ Parkenfestivalen