Posts tagged with "music career"

Calvyn Cass illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Calvyn Cass

Q & A with Calvyn Cass

Singer-songwriter, Calvyn Cass, has begun dominating the music song with lyrical tunes to the beat of self-love and acceptance.  The hit single, “Me, Myself, & I”, explores complicated relationships and self-acceptance winning over insecurities.

Here at 360 Magazine, we had the chance to have a Q&A with Calvyn. Read on to learn more about Calvyn Cass and his upcoming new music, WHITE FLAG.

Q- Could you tell us about the creative direction behind ME, Myself & I?

CC- ME, MYSELF & I was one of the first few songs; the third to be exact. It starts with the hook, but it definitely brought up old feelings. I started writing about feeling hurt by someone I loved, and it ended in being def reflection story. The video shows that with me performing to myself in all my different layers. It’s probably the fastest I ever wrote and recorded a song. From starting to put pen to paper with the first line to finishing recording the demo was probably an hour.

Q- What would you like fans to take away from ME, Myself & I along with the video?

CC-I think the main narrative is that is ok to embrace all feelings but not let them define you. You can look at yourself and be like, “it’s not all about you” and own the way you were but move on from it. On the flip side my new song coming out April 28th is WHITE FLAG and that’s about identifying navigating how to be there for others in the way they need you. It’s a song about someone I love having an internal battle that made them reactive to me. In that moment I felt that I could either be reactive myself in response or step back, realize this is not about me and just give love. Sometimes it’s hard to watch someone you love to behave in a destructive way, but you can’t force someone to see something they aren’t ready to see. You just gotta let them know you come in peace and that you’re there when they are ready to let you in.

Q- Who was your biggest musical inspiration in writing ME, Myself & I?

CC- I have to admit I struggled with this in the beginning. I have always had this immense pressure to associate myself with other artists in order to justify my music. When I wrote that record, I kept thinking of Beyoncé and her record from her first album. I have always been a Destiny’s Child fan and I loved her record, but I know it’s been done. More than trying to find inspiration I found myself avoiding doing what’s been done. She’s an icon and I think what got her there is doing her thing and owning it. I think I look to artists like Bey who have paved their own musical lane as career inspiration. I’m just gonna keep doing my thing. Some people will love it, but others won’t, and I’m cool with that now.

Q- Who would you like to collaborate with in the future?

CC- So many artists for so many different reasons. I love Lil Nas X because he represents what I am hoping to achieve as an artist. I think we would make insane music together. Miley is a powerhouse and if I could be on a record with her, it would be a wet dream. Demi is having this journey unfold before us all. There are so many parts of that journey that are familiar in one way or another and the message is something I would be honored to be a part of. Olly Alexander who recently starred in “It’s A Sin” is seemingly embarking on the next chapter of his career embracing his identity more. If I could be apart of any of these artistic moments that I believe will help change and shape the world I would count myself lucky as hell.

Q- Did your move from South Africa to Canada influence your music at all?

CC- I see the cultural shift I experienced at a young age as a stage in my life that shaped me. It was probably my least favorite time of my life. I was this small, effeminate boy when I moved. In South Africa I struggled fitting in with the hyper masculine molding boys are expected to be. In Canada I saw it as a chance to start over without anyone knowing my past struggles. That didn’t go as planned because I was then the weird immigrant who spoke differently and had a very different perception of the world. In each circumstance I tried fitting in and when it didn’t work out, I had to step back and try figure out why. I didn’t when I was young, but I see it now. It complex to break down in a short interview but now every time I write and record, I tap into the cultural difference and similarities. I want to be able to speak to as many people and be as relatable as possible. Everyone is navigating this complicated journey called life. The best we can do is try being empathetic and honest.

Q- What advice could you offer others as far as embracing the true way they see themselves?

CC- It’s no one else’s job to make you comfortable in your own skin. You will definitely feel like a victim of persecution because that’s a part of life; others will always try cut you down, so they stand taller. Appeasing others by changing who you are to make them comfortable will only hinder you on your path. It’s terrifying to stand in your truth and face scrutiny because it might cut deeper but I promise you, it did the opposite for me. When I let go of trying to impress everyone else was the first time, I felt like I could truly breathe. I released the vizard and accepted myself to find the pressure put on me was put on me by myself. I set the insane standards for myself from what I thought the people around me would feel more comfortable with. Here I am in my adult life realizing that if I had honored myself, I would have avoided a lot of sadness.

Q- Who are your musical inspirations?

CC- I’m inspired less by artists and more by the songs themselves. I love finding out who wrote a song and who produced it. Of course, the voice on a record can give me chills and bring me to tears. The way that voice shines come from all these other peoples’ talents and contributions to the music. That’s what inspires me. Paying attention to how sounds were created, layered and pieced together.

Q- You are co-founder of BRUSH Salon – do you plan to continue to pursue your career as a master stylist alongside your music career?

CC- I am. When I was in high school, I fully intended to pursue music. The world was different then and I let the people around me tell me that a gay boy with feminine features would never succeed in music. I always loved playing with my sisters hair when we watched movies. She hated it but let me anyways because it meant she could choose the movie. So, I am now at the top and have achieved so many of my goals in hair. I love it but I’ve felt like this part of me has been stuck in limbo. I can’t ignore it anymore and I want to pursue music. The world allows people to be more than one thing and I’m going to ride that wave.

Q- Outside of music and styling, what are your passions?

CC- Depends on the season. I love being outside in spring and summer. I’m one those dog lovers that sees my boys as my children, so I dedicate a lot of time to them. I love cooking and find it therapeutic to cook for my family and friends. I love being active, but my ultimate reset is to just spend a winter day in bed with snack watching movies or maybe an entire series… haha

Q- Looking ahead, what plans do you have in store for the remainder of 2021?

CC- Lots of music. I want to bring new music as much as it possible. I want to perform when I’m allowed to and introduce my music to more and more people. I’d love to collaborate with other artists when we are restricted from doing so.

Cardi B x Reebok illustration by Heather Skovlund for use by 360 Magazine

Cardi B × Dr. Varkony

Cardi B interview highlights how plastic surgery can boost confidence and foster a better life, says Dr. Steven J. Varkony

The Encino-based plastic surgeon comments on a recent article that many patients find plastic surgery and cosmetic procedures to be just the boost they need.

A February 23 article on Interview Magazine is a conversation touching on various types of body enhancements, including buttock augmentation, between superstar rapper Cardi B and legendary singer Mariah Carey. Cardi B, who started out as a stripper before transitioning to reality TV and then finally to a music career, notes how the procedures gave her more than one of the world’s most widely discussed physiques, they also gave her the confidence she needed to excel in a career as a Grammy-winning performer beloved for her provocative, brutally honest, take-no-prisoners approach. Encino-based, board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Steven J. Varkony says that Cardi B’s interview highlights a vital point about plastic surgery: it’s not strictly about improving one’s appearance; it’s also meant to help patients become the people they truly want to be by gaining the confidence they need to achieve their goals.

Dr. Varkony says that most people who get plastic surgery are not show business superstars like Cardi B or Mariah Carey, or in show business at all, but ordinary people from all walks of life and all professions who want to better themselves in ways that may be otherwise out of reach. He adds that, whether patients want to pursue facial procedures to shorten the length of their nose, reduce wrinkles on their face, improve the size of their bust, or commit to any other enhancement, most simply want to feel more like their ideas of themselves and look more on the outside like the way they feel on the inside.

The board-certified plastic surgeon explains that plastic surgery and cosmetic procedures are a gateway to possibilities that would not be possible otherwise, yet they are often subject to scorn for reasons that have little to do with the welfare of patients. Dr. Varkony says that people who undergo plastic surgery, like Cardi B, should focus on what makes them happy. Moreover, the only opinion about a procedure that actually matters belongs to the patient. The Southern California plastic surgeon stresses that, as long as individuals have realistic expectations and are doing the procedures for themselves and not simply to please others, patients should feel proud of their decision to improve themselves in whatever manner they please.

Readers can read more about board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Steven J. Varkony by visiting his website and learning about his background or by calling (818) 907-9090.

"Caught In The Middle" by SK8 artwork via Atlantic Records for use by 360 Magazine

SK8 – CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE

TAYLOR GANG SINGER HERALDS UPCOMING PROJECT WITH SECOND ALT-ROCK JAM ARRIVING TODAY ALONGSIDE DANIEL KELLY-DIRECTED VISUAL

Fast-rising Taylor Gang singer, SK8, is continuing his musical evolution into alternative rock with his new single, “Caught In The Middle” – LISTEN HERE.

Over an infectious guitar riff and trap-like drums, SK8 uses a nostalgia-tinged pop/punk chorus to describe feeling caught between wanting a relationship and wanting to pursue his dreams.

I’ve always known that I wanted to be a recording artist. I wanted the life that I’d seen my favorite musicians and bands live. I moved all the way from Omaha, Nebraska to achieve that dream and sometimes that dream pulls you in a direction that separates you from another thing you want in your life. ‘Caught In The Middle’ is about that constant push and pull and trying to find the balance in my personal life and music career.” –SK8

“Caught In The Middle” arrives today alongside a dramatic visual directed by SK8’s frequent collaborator, Daniel Kelly – WATCH HERE.

The new single and video from the Omaha, NE born, LA-based singer arrives after his first foray into alt-rock with “Famous” featuring fellow ascending recording artist Tyla Yaweh, which also received an accompanying Daniel Kelly-directed visual. American Songwriter praised “Famous,” noting that, “SK8 effortlessly blends hip-hop and punk into some newly evolved sound.” Additionally, Hot New Hip Hop hailed the song as a, “genre-melting experience.”

“Caught In The Middle” is the second single from SK8’s upcoming project, arriving soon…

STREAM/DOWNLOAD “CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE” HERE

WATCH SK8’S PREVIOUS MUSIC VIDEO FOR “FAMOUS (FEAT. TYLA YAWEH)” [Directed By: Daniel Kelly]

ABOUT SK8:

At 15, you could find SK8 in his room writing lyrics, and by his sophomore year, you could find him handing out CDs in high school. The 23-year-old moved to Los Angeles from Omaha, Nebraska and linked with the venerable Taylor Gang, first breaking into the mainstream with his gold-certified single, “Like That,” with Jack & Jack and opening for revered rap icons like Lil Wayne, 2 Chainz and Rae Sremmurd. SK8 began building a dedicated fanbase of dreamers who related to his message of seizing every moment long before his eventual move to LA. Shortly after founding his own imprint, Alignment, and formally signing a joint venture with Atlantic Records via James McMillan’s ART@WAR, SK8 released his major label debut EP, sk8sounds, which was buttressed by the standout singles “Omme (Feat. Wiz Khalifa),” “XXX” and “Mood (Feat. YK Osiris).” Over a year later, SK8 turned a new page in his career with his first single of 2021, “Famous (Feat. Tyla Yaweh),” and its associated forthcoming project which finds the rising singer seamlessly blending punk/rock instrumentation with his hip-hop origins, the latest, but not last, development in SK8’s rapidly evolving artistry.

guitar, rock, strum, tabs, strings

How Women Can Overcome Music Industry Challenges

By Deborah Fairchild

If someone were to ask me how I managed to thrive in a male-dominated industry and rise to the position of president at VEVA Sound – and how other young women could similarly succeed – here would be my response:

For me, it has always been about focusing on the work and knowing that if you just do that, everything else will take care of itself. When something needs to happen, just get it done. 

Get it done even if it seems like a menial task. Get it done even if there’s no immediate reward being dangled in front of you. And get it done even if there is no clear indication that what you’re doing will result in a promotion, a raise, or other good things happening somewhere down the road.

Putting in the time and effort doesn’t necessarily guarantee success in the music industry (and likely not in any industry). But success can’t happen without that time and effort.

This approach to the working world goes all the way back to my first studio internship. Whatever task was placed before me and needed to be accomplished, I would do it – right down to the unfulfilling but necessary job of cleaning the toilets. (And yes, I actually cleaned toilets. The music industry isn’t always a glamorous world.)

I think that I knew, even at a young age, that if I just kept my attention on the work at hand, and concentrated on what I was doing versus what everyone else was doing, success would find me.

That proved to be true, and this approach continues to pay dividends for me to this day – and maybe could do the same for young women who are probably much like I was several years back, cultivating dreams and ambitions.

In my case, I always loved music and I also had a technical mind. It was a matter of taking those two things and mixing them together, which is why I got my degree in audio engineering. Once I finished college, working as an archival engineer gave me a steady income and allowed me to be around music all day. The rest is history.

Of course, all of this still leaves the question of whether it Is more difficult for a woman than a man to achieve success in the music industry. Certainly, women are underrepresented in our industry, as they are in many others. To give you an idea of that underrepresentation, a study released in 2019 by the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative looked at 700 popular songs. What that study found was that women accounted for only 21.7% of artists, 12.5% of songwriters, and 2.7% of producers. 

I also can report that over the years I have encountered situations where a man could do or say one thing, but I know it would be unacceptable for me to do or say the same thing.

So, yes, a young woman with ambitions to enter our industry will face challenges, but those challenges shouldn’t deter you. 

After all, the music business is hard for everyone – male or female. Breaking in is tough. Then navigating the business once you’re in is difficult. Finally, it can be extraordinarily challenging to continue to succeed in the business over time, even after you’ve had your initial success. 

The key is to set aside any negative thoughts about all those challenges and focus on what you can control. Be determined to do the work and strive to learn everything you can from everyone you can. 

People are fond of saying, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” That’s true only to a degree. Who you know may bring opportunities initially, but what you know gives you staying power in this business. 

Ultimately, knowledge and determination have been the two most important factors in my success. They can be for others as well.

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years, she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville. Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions. 

Cash and wallet illustration for 360 Magazine

4 Tips For Ambitious Young Women’s Careers

The COVID-19 pandemic proved to be a double whammy for young women eager to launch their careers.

Young people in general have had their job searches stymied by the recession. Meanwhile, women of all ages have seen their careers impacted negatively more than men by the events of 2020.

But despite the challenges, there is hope for ambitious young women just starting out who want to make a mark, even in male-centric industries, says Deborah Fairchild, president of Nashville-based VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), which verifies and archives projects for clients in the music industry.

“That doesn’t mean it’s going to be easy,” she says. “But if you can avoid becoming discouraged, and can face the world with firm determination, the opportunities will be there.”

Fairchild, who started her career with VEVA Sound as an archival engineer in 2004 and rose to lead the company in all facets of the business, has succeeded in an industry in which women are still underrepresented.

Just as an example, a study released in 2019 by the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative looked at 700 popular songs and found that women accounted for only 21.7% of artists, 12.5% of songwriters, and 2.7% of producers.

Fairchild understands the challenges today’s young women face, and she offers a few tips for those who are just now launching their careers and hope to move up in their organizations:

  • Be prepared to clean toilets. This could be viewed metaphorically, but in Fairchild’s case it was also literal. “When I started as an intern at a studio, I did everything they asked – even clean toilets,” she says. “To pursue a professional career in the music industry, you have to be prepared to pay your dues, starting at the bottom and working your way up. I imagine that’s true for a lot of other industries as well.”
  • Learn from everyone. Formal education is great, and it’s wonderful to have a college degree, but once you’re on the job you will discover how much more there is to learn from watching and listening to other people, Fairchild says. Just about anyone in an organization – from the lowest-paid employee to the CEO – has skills or knowledge they can share with you that will prove useful in your career journey. “Whenever you meet someone,” she says, “always assume they have something to teach you until they prove they don’t.”
  • Networking is a key, but not the key. Who you know is important. So is what you know. “A strong network will give you opportunities,” Fairchild says, “but your knowledge and capabilities will be what give you a long-lasting career.”
  • Know when to pivot. At every stage of your career, stay sensitive to when it’s time to pivot, Fairchild says. “The interesting thing about the music industry is that some things take generations to change, while others change on a dime,” she says. “The ability to discern when to move on or when to double down will set you apart.”

“The pandemic has made things tough for those just trying to launch a career, which means it’s more important than ever to stay positive and persevere,” Fairchild says. “Grab the opportunities that are there, and then make the most of them.”

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville.

Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions.

Harry Hudson Drops Video For “Just Slide”

Harry Hudson unveiled the video for his latest single “Just Slide” feat. Jaden Smith —watch and share HERE. “Just Slide” was produced by notable producers Mike Dean [Kanye West, JAY-Z, Travis Scott, 2Pac], Jess Jackson [Tyga, Jason Derulo, Chris Brown] and John Ho [Danity Kane, Kimbra]. The video was filmed in Biloxi, MS, Toronto, ON, Salt Lake City, UT and Calabasas, CA while Harry was on his headlining Can Cowboys Cry Tour last fall.

Of the video, Harry says, “It’s a continuation of the Can Cowboys Cry saga with an unexpected and surreal twist. The story will continue in the next chapter of the journey and my next project.”

“Just Slide” sets the stage for new music from Harry Hudson in 2019.

25-year-old “Folk Pop” artist Harry Hudson was born in New Jersey but moved to the west coast at a young age. The singer released his first song, “World Is Gone,” online in 2013. However, during June of that year, Hudson was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and set his career aside to undergo treatment. After eight months of chemotherapy, he overcame the illness in January 2014. Hudson spent the subsequent year rediscovering his inspirations and got to work writing his debut release. Last year, Hudson released Yesterday’s Tomorrow Night, which features his breakout singles, “Yellow Lights” and “Cry For Love,” and blends Hudson’s signature pop Americana sound with folk and rock influences. In support of Yesterday’s Tomorrow Night, Hudson debuted his 16 minute short film, Can Cowboys Cry, featuring his friend and fellow MSFTS member Jaden Smith, as well as his songs “Yellow Lights,” “Cry For Love,” “Gone” and “No Good.” Last fall, Harry embarked on his first ever headlining tour, selling out shows across North America.

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