Posts tagged with "2020 Election"

Final Presidential Debate

By Hannah DiPilato 

The final presidential debate took place on Thursday. Significantly less chaotic than the first debate, both candidates were able to express their opinions on certain issues and to respond to the moderator, Kristen Welker‘s, questions, for the most part. 

The first unavoidable topic presented was the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Current President Donald Trump took over the first question claiming that a vaccine would be distributed as soon as a few weeks from now. He claimed the military is ready to distribute 100 million vaccinations. He also placed emphasis on the fact coronavirus is a worldwide problem as well as emphasizing his own recovery.  

Presidential candidate Joe Biden came in with a rebuttal focusing on families that have lost loved ones as a result of the pandemic and how Trump will not take responsibility for these deaths. He also used the statistic that a predicted 200,000 Americans would die before the end of 2020 at the current rate. Trump disagreed with this and compared coronavirus to the Swine Flu which occurred while Joe Biden was Vice President. 

Welker then led the conversation to lockdowns as a result of Covid-19. Biden began by saying he plans to shut down Covid, not the country. He wants to get places with high reproduction rates under control. 

Trump’s main point was that schools should reopen because children aren’t the main concern in relation to the pandemic. He talked about his son’s rapid recovery and his belief schools should open. 

“I don’t look at this as blue states and red states, we’re the United States,” said Biden. However, he quickly followed this statement by saying upticks have been seen mostly in red states. Trump responded that America should not shut down, but instead just protect the elderly and those at high risk. 

After a significant amount of time discussing coronavirus, the topic switched to national security. Biden questioned why Russia, China and Iran are interfering with the election and Trump has not taken any measures to handle this. Trump refuted this saying nobody is tougher on Russia than himself and pointed fingers at Biden saying Russia is paying Biden a lot of money. 

Biden then explained how he has never taken money from another country but points a finger at Trump who has overseas accounts, pressuring Trump to reveal his tax records. Trump then explained he prepays his taxes and that he would love to release the taxes as soon as he can. He stressed that the IRS “treats him very badly.” 

The next main topic of the debate was American families, beginning with a focus on healthcare. Trump wants to create a healthcare plan that is better than Obamacare while always protecting those with preexisting conditions. He accused Biden of wanting to eliminate private healthcare. 

Biden responded that he supports private insurance and no one would lose their private insurance under his plan. He said he wants to continue Obamacare as Bidencare He explained he wants everyone to have a public healthcare option and he plans to lower drug prices and insurance premiums. Trump also compared Biden to the United States Senator Bernie Sanders, but Biden said he disagreed with Sanders’ plans. 

Welker asked both candidates if this was the right time to raise the minimum wage considering the Covid-19 pandemic. Trump explained he would consider raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour, but that minimum wage heavily depends on the state. On the other hand, Biden believes everyone deserves a minimum wage of at least $15 an hour in order to live without multiple jobs. 

Many people have previously had issues with how Trump has handled immigration laws in the past. His views have not seemed to change since he said illegal immigrant children are brought by “coyotes and bad people” to America as a ploy to get into the country. 

Biden’s response was that the children were not brought by “bad people” but parents that deserve equality. If he were to be elected, he plans to make more undocumented people citizens and able to stay in the United States. Trump then responded that if you take in a rapist or murder ICE then has to come to find them and only those with the “lowest IQ” will come back to get caught. 

The Black Lives Matter movement has brought systemic racism into the media, so Welker ensured both candidates addressed these issues. Biden gave a very sympathetic response where he spoke about wanting to learn more about systemic racism and that he understands the hardships families of color go through. He touched on white privilege and institutionalized racism as well and believes there should be less imprisonment for drug problems. 

Trump claimed that “no one has done what I’ve done” regarding racism. He claimed he has great relationships and that that he “is the least racist person in the room.” This was ironic considering the Kristen Welker is a person of color. He also claimed he has done the most for racism since Abraham Lincoln. 

Nearing the end of the debate, the topic of conversation was climate change. Trump explained he created a lot of “programs” to battle climate change but was being incredibly vague. He explained America has a very good carbon emission and he defended his decision to back out of the Paris Accord. 

“We don’t have much time, we’re going to pass the point of no return, return the next eight to 10 years,” said Biden on the topic. Biden wants more industries to transition to clean energy and he has a plan to have 100% clean energy by 2050. 

At the end of the debate, each candidate was asked to speak directly to those that did not vote for them if they were elected. Trump explained he wanted to make the country successful, how it was before the pandemic. He expressed that he has been able to have the best unemployment rate for minorities and how he wants to cut taxes, unlike Biden. 

Biden clarified that he represents everyone, whether someone voted for him or not. He said he would emphasize hope over fear and science over fiction. He wants to help the economy, end systemic racism and promote clean energy. He concluded by saying what is on the ballot is the character of the United States.

The aftermath of the debate on social media was less prominent compared to the first debate, but there were still a few highlights. Rapper 50 Cent said he will be voting for Trump because of Biden’s tax plan.

“Yeah, I don’t want to be 20 Cent. 62 percent is a very, very, bad idea. I don’t like it,” said the rapper on Tuesday. 

States of Change

Larry Sultan, Dad on Bed, 1984 from the series Pictures from Home © Larry Sultan

ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHERS AND ARTISTS JOIN FORCES TO GET OUT THE VOTE AND FIGHT VOTER SUPPRESSION IN KEY SWING STATES WITH “STATES OF CHANGE”

Work from 150+ American Photographers & Artists to Support 42 Local Groups October 13-18, http://statesofchange.us/

States of Change is an online print sale fundraiser in support of local groups working on the ground in five key swing states (AZ, FL, MI, PA and WI) to fight voter suppression and to get out the vote. States of Change is organized in partnership with Movement Voter Project.The fundraiser runs online at statesofchange.us from October 13th to 18th at midnight PST, featuring prints from 150+ artists and photographers priced at $150.

Movement Voter Project has selected 42 of the best and most impactful local community-based organizations, with a focus on youth and communities of color, working in five key swing states. These organizations work to get out the vote, fight voter suppression, organize communities to grow their power and build infrastructure that will lead to lasting change. In this short period of time before the election, groups are working on everything from early vote education and mobilization to polls protection to fighting voter disenfranchisement. 

Participants include Alec Soth, Catherine Opie, Carrie Mae Weems, Cindy Sherman, Dawoud Bey, Ed Ruscha, Gordon Parks, Hank Willis Thomas, Kim Gordon, Larry Sultan, Mario Sorrenti, Nan Goldin, Robert Frank, Sally Mann, Sharon Lockhart, Stephen Shore, Steve McCurry,and the list goes on and on. 

The team at States of Change explains, “There’s the prevailing sense that the country and our democracy are spinning out of control, and that we are powerless to stop it. We didn’t want to become resigned to a sense of darkness and had to act. Inspired by the change artists made with the Pictures for Elmhurst project, we decided to band together to support these amazing non-profits. Every dollar we donate will make a real and direct impact on voter turnout.”

Billy Wimsatt, Founder & Executive Director of MVP, states, “Movement Voter Project is honored to partner with States of Change and world-renowned photographers to support critical voter organizing in the top 5 battleground states. Together, we are funding incredible local organizations that will get out the vote in the final weeks and continue their vital life-saving work beyond Election Day.”

Follow us on Instagram and #statesofchange2020. More information and prints are available at www.statesofchange.us.

John Divola Untitled, circa 1980 Courtesy of the artist

ABOUT THE PRINTS:

Prints are available for $150 plus shipping costs. All prints are the same size, 10 x 12 inches, with a smaller printed area that is variable depending on the aspect ratio of the photograph. Prints are available in an open edition and are unsigned.All prints are made on Canson Platine Fibre Rag 310. This is a premium 100% cotton paper that offers the look and aesthetic of the original darkroom baryta fiber print and complies with the ISO 9706 standard for maximum longevity. Prints are made from digital files using archival inkjet printing—sometimes referred to as pigment printing, or gicleé printing. This method is the current industry standard for photographic printing.Printing services for this fundraiser are being provided by Light Work. An amount of $15.50 will be deducted from the cost of each print to offset expenses for production and fulfillment. All net proceeds go to the Movement Voter Project.

ABOUT US:

States of Change was made by a small group of artists and friends trying to make a difference. We are:Mitchell Barton, Matthew Booth, Alice Braccini, Trevor Clement, Jim Goldberg, Gregory Halpern, Alessandra Sanguinetti and Korey Vincent.For their generous assistance and support we would like to extend our deepest gratitude to Claire Davis, Jason Fulford, Africia Heiderhoff, Kristen Lubben, Jody Rojac, Nicole Meade, Ian Simmons, Susan Meiselas and Ahndraya Parlato. And, of course, none of this would be possible without our participating artists’ generosity.

Movement Voter Project works to strengthen progressive power at all levels of government by helping donors –big and small –support the best and most promising local community-based organizations in key states, with a focus on youth and communities of color. We support hundreds of incredible organizations that both turn out unlikely voters and organize communities to grow their power and create transformation, from policy to the streets. We believe that supporting local movement vote groups is the most effective and most cost-effective strategy to transform our country. Learn more at movement.vote.

Grassroots Organizations The 2020 general election hinges on the outcome in these five states: Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Arizona. Now more than ever, we need to invest in local groups working on the ground in these states. They know how to organize their own communities, and they’ve been building trust with voters since long before the current crisis. They need our support to win in November and build toward the future we want to see. Learn more on our Organization’s Page. 

CONTACT

info@statesofchange.us

www.statesofchange.us

Khalik Allah Out The Box, 2011 © Khalik Allah / Magnum Photos

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS:

The list of contributing artists includes many of the top commercial and fine art photographers working today: Aaron Schuman / Abelardo Morell / Adam Pape / Ahndraya Parlato / Alec Soth / Alessandra Sanguinetti / Alex Majoli / Alfredo Jaar / Amani Willett / Amy Troost / Andrea Modica / Andres Gonzalez / Ann Weathersby / Anthony Hernandez / Ari Marcopoulos / Arthur Ou / Bayeté Ross Smith / Brian Ulrich / Bryan Schutmaat / Bryson Rand / Camille Seaman / Carmen Winant / Carolyn Drake / Carrie Mae Weems / Cass Bird / Catherine Opie / Chris McCaw / Christian Patterson / Christopher Anderson / Cindy Sherman / Clara Balzary / Curran Hatleberg / Daniel Gordon / Daniel Shea / Danna Singer / Dannielle Bowman / Danny Lyon / David Maisel / David Levinthal / Dawoud Bey / Deanna Templeton / Diana Markosian / Dionne Lee / Doug DuBois / Dru Donovan / Ed Panar / Ed Ruscha / Ed Templeton / Eli Reed / Elinor Carucci / Emily Shur / Emmet Gowin / Eric Gottesman / Eva O’Leary / Fumi Ishino / Gerard Gaskin / Gordon Parks / Gregory Eddi Jones / Gregory Halpern / Gus Powell / Hank Willis Thomas / Hannah Price / Hannah Whitaker / Henry Horenstein / Ike Edeani / Irina Rozovsky / Jack Pierson / James Casebere/ James Welling / Janet Delaney / Jason Fulford / Jeffrey Whetstone / Jim Goldberg / Joel Fisher / Joel Sternfeld / John Divola/ John Gossage / John Lehr / John Pilson / Jon Feinstein / Jon Rubin / Jonathan Gardenhire / Katy Grannan / Ken Light / Khalik Allah / Kim Gordon / Landon Nordeman / Larry Sultan / Laura Letinsky / Laura McPhee / Laurel Nakadate / Lelanie Foster / Leonard Suryajaya / Liz Cohen / Lorie Novak / Luc Sante / Mario Sorrenti / Mark Steinmetz / Matt Sayles / Matthew Connors / Matthew Leifheit / Matthew Porter / McNair Evans / Melissa Catanese / Meron Menghistab / Michael Christopher Brown / Michael Schmelling / Mike Mandel / Milagros de la Torre / Mimi Plumb / Mitch Epstein / Moyra Davey / Nan Goldin / Nelson Chan / Nicholas Muellner / Pacifico Silano / Penelope Umbrico / Peter Sutherland / Peter van Agtmael / Pixy Liao / Raymond Meeks / Renée Stout / Ricardo Nagaoka / Richard Misrach / Richard Mosse / Richard Renaldi / Robert Frank / Roe Ethridge / Ron Jude / Rosalind Fox Solomon /Rose Marie Cromwell / S*an D. Henry-Smith / Sally Mann / Samantha Box / Sara Cwynar / Sasha Phyars-Burgess / Sasha Rudensky / Sean Pressley / Sebastian Kim / Shane Lavalette / Sharon Core / Sharon Lockhart / Sheila Pree Bright / Sinna Nasseri / Stacy Kranitz / Stephen Shore / Steve McCurry / Suha Traboulsi and Walid Raad / Susan Meiselas / Susan Worsham / Tabitha Soren / Tanya Marcuse / Tim Davis / Todd Hido / Tommy Kha / Trevor Clement / Victoria Sambunaris / Wendy Ewald / Yto Barrada / Zoë GhertnerMark Steinmetz

Trump Tax Findings posted by 360 MAGAZINE and illustrated by Rita Azar.

Trump’s Tax Records Exposed

By Hannah DiPilato

Recently The New York Times got ahold of President Donald J. Trump’s tax information and made the shocking discovery that he has not been paying his fair share of taxes. 

According to The New York Times in 2016 and 2017, Trump only paid $750 in taxes each year. Many working Americans pay much more than this and have an income that is far lower than Trump’s. The Times also reported Trump paid nothing for income takes for 10 of the last 15 years. 

“The Fake News Media, just like Election time 2016, is bringing up my Taxes & all sorts of other nonsense with illegally obtained information & only bad intent,” said Trump in a tweet today, September 28th. “I paid many millions of dollars in taxes but was entitled, like everyone else, to depreciation & tax credits….. Also, if you look at the extraordinary assets owned by me, which the Fake News hasn’t, I am extremely under leveraged – I have very little debt compared to the value of assets.” 

Although Trump is brushing this off as fake news, the evidence proves otherwise. Trump has hidden these records and sold others to the American people. Although he takes in hundreds of millions of dollars a year, Trump has claimed losses that gave him millions of dollars in tax refunds. 

This information is being revealed just 37 days before the presidential election where Trump appears to be just behind the democratic candidate Joe Biden. The first presidential debate is also coming up in two days, a debate that may need to question Trump’s behaviors regarding taxes. In the first debate in Cleveland, Ohio on Tuesday, Biden could easily interrogate Trump with these accusations. 

Alan Garten, a lawyer for the Trump Organization spoke on the findings in a letter. “Most, if not all, of the facts appear to be inaccurate,” said Garten and requested to see the documents that the accusations were based on. After seeing the records, Garten said that Trump “has paid tens of millions of dollars of taxes to the federal government.” However, by saying “personal taxes,” it appears that Garten is combining income taxes with various other federal taxes. 

The Twitter account “Team Joe” made a video comparing the tax returns of middle-class workers to those of Trump in 2019. They reported that the typical income tax for elementary school teachers was $7,239, for a firefighter the average was $5,283 and for a nurse it was common to pay $10,216. They then compared this to Donald Trump’s payment of $750.

Trump’s millionaire persona could be all about appearances. He is facing a lengthy audit battle with the Internal Revenue Service because of a $72.9 million tax refund that he claimed. The IRS is investigating the legitimacy of this claim which he received after declaring major losses. If the IRS finds this claim to be false, Trump could owe over $100 million. 

For example, Trump disclosed in 2018 that he had brought in at least $434.9 million, but his tax records show a loss of $47.4 million. Tax records are not specific enough to investigate all the business expenses that Trump uses to reduce his taxable income. For example, from 2016 to 2017 Trump’s Bedminster golf club in New Jersey showed expenses that increased fivefold. He has even previously boasted that getting away with paying fewer taxes makes him smart. 

The president also brings in a hefty income from overseas in various different countries. In his first two years in office, this revenue added up to $73 million. He paid more to other countries then he did to The United States, by thousands. 

Trump’s tax records can be compared to President Richard M. Nixon’s tax bill that showed in 1970 he paid $792.81 of taxes when his income was around $200,000. When this information was revealed there was an uproar from the American people and resulted in the decision that presidents and presidential candidates should allow their tax records to be shared. In 2014, Trump even agreed to this saying, “I would love the do that,” referring to revealing his tax records if he ran for office. Then when he ran, Trump mocked this idea and said he would make the records public if Hillary Clinton made her deleted emails public and if Barack Obama showed his birth certificate. 

This information could greatly impact the election coming up in November. Depending on how people that planned to vote for Trump take these findings into consideration. Biden has been previously leading the polls, so it will be interesting to see how things will play out in both the upcoming debates and the election.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Mail-in Ballots

Pearl Jam Announces Vote-By-Mail Initiative

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame band Pearl Jam today launched an initiative to encourage their fans to join them and take the “Take-Three Pledge: Vote by Mail, Recruit Three Friends, and Don’t Wait”.

Voting by mail increases participation and ensures that voters can cast their ballot easily, safely and securely.

“Voting freely and easily is our ultimate right as citizens of these United States” said Pearl Jam Bass Guitarist Jeff Ament. “It’s a hard-fought gift from our foremothers and forefathers.  Join us in our Take Three Pledge: Vote by Mail, Recruit Three Friends, and Don’t Wait. Learn more www.pearljam.com or text PJVotes to 52886 and join us.”

Pearl Jam has had a long history of activism and political involvement dating all the way back to 1992 when they hosted the free “Drop in the Park” concert in Seattle that registered thousands of voters.  For nearly three decades, the band has played in countless benefit concerts, been outspoken advocates for progressive causes, and donated millions of dollars to local and global non-profits personally and through their Vitalogy Foundation. Pearl Jam was active in the 2018 general election in its Rock2Vote initiative, which registered thousands of voters in Montana and secured commitments to vote.

“We believe America is at its best when every voice is heard,” said Eddie Vedder. “This is the most important election in our nation’s history. Our democracy is at risk. Your vote is your voice, and it’s time to use it.  Join us by voting by mail — something our band has been doing for almost three decades, since we began touring in 1992.  It’s safe, it’s easy, and it’s secure.”

The band is partnering with leading national organizations including People For the American Way, the League of Conservation Voters as well as select regional organizations like Make the Road Pennsylvania to promote voting by mail.

After you complete the Take-Three Pledge, you can also pre-order Pearl Jam’s 1992 MTV Unplugged Session. Just days after Pearl Jam completed their first American tour, the band made their way up to New York City on March 16th, 1992 to play songs from their debut album “Ten”.

Experience Pearl Jam’s 1992 MTV Unplugged Session with the 2019 Record Store Day release on Vinyl & First Time Ever on CD. The CD and LP Vinyl are set to release Friday, October 23rd. Both formats are available for pre-order HERE.

Follow Pearl Jam

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politics, podium, flag, speech

Supreme Court’s “Faithless Electors” Ruling

By Ted Trimpa

The rapidly growing movement toward a national popular vote for president got a boost on July 6 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states can legally require presidential electors to vote for the candidate they promised to support when their political party nominated them.

The decision on so-called “faithless electors” underscores Article 2, Section 1 of the Constitution, which gives each state legislature the power to decide the manner in which presidential electors are chosen within their jurisdiction. Under the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, states that combine for 270 or more electoral votes would use that power to award their electors to the candidate who receives the most individual votes across all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

In other words, the compact would ensure that the Electoral College always reflects the will of the majority of voters across the U.S. Thus far, 15 states and the District of Columbia – comprising 196 electoral votes – have passed the National Popular Vote law and signed onto the compact. There are at least three important reasons why this reform measure makes sense.

First and foremost, a National Popular Vote would bring on a true 50-state presidential campaign in which every voter in every state is politically relevant.

Under the current system, we don’t so much elect the President of the United States as we do the President of the Battleground States – the handful of jurisdictions where the candidates spend virtually all their resources chasing blocks of electoral votes with the propensity to swing back and forth every four years. Candidates all but ignore the other 40 or so states, which can be expected to faithfully go red or blue without any further attention.

Under a National Popular Vote, candidates would surely be compelled to chase down every voter in every state, listen to their concerns, and pay attention to their local and regional issues. Imagine the Republican ticket barnstorming through Massachusetts, New York, and other ‘blue’ states they would otherwise ignore, while Democrats rally in reliably ‘red’ states like the Dakotas, Kansas, and West Virginia. The entire character of our presidential elections would change because winning 270 electoral votes and the White House would directly depend on winning the national popular vote.

Secondly, National Popular Vote would significantly amplify the power of voters in small states and rural states to help elect a president.

For example, under the current system, my home state of Colorado has a direct voice in allocating just our own block of nine electoral votes. Under a National Popular Vote, Coloradans gain a direct voice over the selection of 270 electors – enough to elect a president. Everyone would have their vote counted directly toward their choice for president. And the presidential candidate who gets the most popular votes would become president.

And third, a National Popular Vote would provide powerful insurance against the possibility of voter fraud swinging a presidential election to the wrong candidate.

Simple math and logic dictate that under a National Popular Vote, it would be virtually impossible to alter the hundreds of thousands, or more likely the millions of votes it would take to fraudulently elect a president.

Not so under the current system. Today, a handful of tampered votes could easily swing a razor-close presidential election one way or another. Changing a few hundred votes in Florida in 2000 would have swung the state’s 25 electoral votes, and the election, from Bush to Gore. Changing a few thousand votes in just a state or two in 2004 could have given the presidency to John Kerry, even though George W. Bush scored a national popular vote victory of more than three million.

The National Popular Vote movement is a constitutionally, uniquely, American idea whose time is fast approaching – and with just 74 electoral votes left in order to take effect, perhaps as soon as 2024.

William Anthony Allen – Harlem’s Renaissance

by Abigail Baldwin × Vaughn Lowery

Earlier this month, 360 had the opportunity to sit down with the award-winning community activist William Anthony Allen. After many years of serving Harlem as a community leader and on the District Council, Allen is exploring the possibility of running for City Council serving the 9th District.

Harlem has long been a beacon of Black culture, community, and heritage since the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Growing up in the 70s and 80s, the Harlem that William Anthony Allen knew was one of unity, familiarity, and freedom. According to Allen, “Crack cocaine came and killed all that. It stopped people from going to the community. It created mistrust. It changed how people participated politically and how they saw themselves. A great number of the working class and middle class of Harlem began to look at other options.” Allen describes his childhood in Harlem as poor but centered in the community, “people were so loving like they were aunts and uncles, but they really were not a blood relationship. The way they treated you, felt like family.” He watched as crack cocaine and the crisis to follow attacked the infrastructure of Harlem and divided the community, giving way to gentrification. “Black people don’t own the businesses in their own neighborhood anymore and young people say that can’t afford to come back to Harlem,” he says. Allen has completed housing and community development efforts in New York, as well as health care and social services proposals on a local, state and federal level. His efforts have always been lead by a desire to uplift the community and uphold the “great legacy” of Harlem, “particularly for African Americans.”

But what are his plans? How does Allen intend to use his experience in the community to serve them at a City Council level? He told 360 he would begin by “sitting down with parent leaders, senior citizen leaders, youth leaders, and really talk about mapping it out in terms of how do they see the future of this community, what do they want from it, and make that the blueprint.” He calls for the people of Harlem to define their own community and make their own decisions, with himself as a representative of their interests. “I’m going to be fighting very hard to address the housing inequities and disparities, helping to lower the cost of housing,” he told 360, “making sure that folks that really want to make a contribution to the life of this city can afford to be here.”

Allen lamented that a particular program that had been around for nearly fifty years, the Addicts Rehabilitation Center (ARC), has closed, “without those services, gentrification moves us all out.” Allen is fighting to get these programs reestablished, but he specifies that black and brown people should be running these programs for the community, “I want to make sure that the people that are running the program are culturally correct.”

In his youth, William Anthony Allen attended Fordham University in the Bronx where he was the first non-white person to serve as Vice President of the Student Council. Later, he transferred to CUNY where he was the Editor-in-Chief of the school newspaper. Now, he is the founding member of a local charter elementary school. He recognizes that education is of the utmost importance. In City Council, Allen plans to create a network through Historically Black Colleges. “We need to make learning and knowledge sexy,” he says, so everyone, regardless of there circumstance can step up and participate in the betterment of their community.” Of his current efforts, he says, “I’m organizing a network of black influencers to address crisis issues that affect black people across the country.” These crisis issues include police relations, employment discrimination, gentrification, and inadequate schools.

For himself, Allen’s goal is, in his own words, “to be known as the guy who brings everybody together to have dialogue and then create action.” He says to not only the Black community but to the youth of Harlem and the LGBTQ+ community, “Tell me how I can support you to have a strong voice.”

“Harlem represents a great legacy, particularly for African Americans. And our entry, not only here into the city but what we have done for the nation,” says Allen, “We need to leverage that.”

William Allen, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery, Harlem, protests

Harlem Democratic District Leader William Allen encourages others to take a knee during a march in honor of George Floyd. Black men march through Harlem, pick up hundreds of others along the way to insure justice by claiming power.