Posts tagged with "Ballers"

NoMBe image provided by Lucy Binetti and Press Here Publicity for use by 360 MAGAZINE.

NoMBe x This Is Not A Love Song

Singer, songwriter, and producer NoMBe has released the music video for “This Is Not A Love Song” off his sophomore album, CHROMATOPIA, out now via TH3RD BRAIN Records. A retrospective breakup song imagining the end of a relationship and the inability to cope, “This Is Not A Love Song” paints an exaggerated picture of NoMBe drowning in sorrow, juxtaposed by dreamy imagery of him in the afterlife. PRESS HERE to watch the video Directed By B and PRESS HERE to check out the premiere on Complex who call the track a “dreamy pop banger.”

“I love how this music video turned out for its simplicity,” shares NoMBe. “We shot in Hawaii during a really rainy period and luckily found a nice day to knock this one out. Originally we were trying to build a giant mirror out of those smaller pieces seen in the clip, but it was such an understanding we decided to make it more about the different angles and locations.”

Referred to as One To Watch by ET Canada and “one of pop’s most intriguing new faces” by Paper Magazine, NoMBe’s recently released 14-track album highlights the complexities of relationships through clever lyricism, infectious melodies, and sultry vocals – PRESS HERE to listen. Offering new perspectives as he lyrically details the internal dialogue of love using elements of pop, electronic, soul, and rock  NoMBe explores its many different hues, providing a first-hand look into his kaleidoscopic world. CHROMATOPIA features the singles “Water Into Wine,” intoxicating “Boy’s Don’t Cry,” breezy dance track “Paint California,” vulnerable ballad “Weirdo,” indie-pop bop “Heels,” and the groovy “Prototype,” which have collectively garnered over 14 million streams and received support from Rolling Stone Australia, Vulture, Hollywood Life, Wonderland, Ones To Watch, and Flood Magazine among others.

NoMBe recently spoke with the GRAMMY Museum’s Schyler O’ Neal to discuss the album  PRESS HERE to watch on COLLECTION:live.

Known for having a modern take on alternative music that is entirely his own, Noah McBeth- under the moniker NoMBe- initially garnered buzz in 2015 with his viral single, “California Girls,” paving the way for his 2018 critically acclaimed debut album They Might’ve Even Loved Me which racked up nearly 180 million Spotify streams and garnered praise from the likes of NPR, Billboard, Clash, WWD, Flaunt Magazine, and Ones To Watch. The vibrant concept album is a tribute to the women in NoMBe’s life who have shaped and impacted who he is today. They Mightve Even Loved Me single “Can’t Catch Me” (ft. New Mystics) was personally chosen by Pharrell Williams as the official theme song to his HBO documentary series OUTPOST, while the track “Drama” (ft. Big Data) was featured in EA Sports’ FIFA World Cup 2019 soundtrack.

A native of Heidelberg, Germany, NoMBe was born into a creative, multicultural family surrounded by art in a multitude of ways. Raised mostly by his grandmother as well as his godmother, R&B legend Chaka Khan, NoMBe was encouraged to pursue music early on and studied classical piano. Along with his formal training, he began experimenting with songwriting and production, sampling hip hop and electronic music, which led to his move to New York where he focused on contemporary production while playing in the subways at night. Over the last decade, NoMBe uprooted his life traveling around the country as he continued to broaden his musical knowledge and career before relocating to Hawaii.

NoMBe has garnered over 355 million global streams with placements in a variety of television shows including Shameless, Ozark, The Resident, The Mighty Ducks: Game Changers, Ballers, and more. He has also performed at Lollapalooza, Firefly Music Festival, SXSW, Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival, and Electric Forest, and received media praise from the likes of Elton JohnPharrell, Time Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Interview Magazine, Complex, Earmilk, and more, making him an artist to watch in 2021.

Griffin Matthews Photography By Carson Davis Brown

Q×A With Griffin Matthews

By Justin Lyons

360 Magazine had the opportunity to sit down with actor, Griffin Matthews, to discuss his successful career. Matthews has been able to work on shows such as Dear White People, Ballers and The Flight Attendantas well as co-writing a successful musical. We were able to discuss his future career plans as well as his activism in the community.

Among acting, writing, directing and other creative positions, which one do you like the best, and which one allows you to best express your own creativity?

I love acting. I love writing. But I ultimately think I’m a director through and through. The responsibility of guiding the entire vision is so exciting to me. It’s such an honor when I get to direct because every story is a little baby that needs to be nurtured properly and guided along her way. And guess what? I’m such a dad. 

How has working with streaming services like Netflix and HBO Max changed the way you address your audience?

When you work on Netflix or HBO you get to really find your unedited voice. You get to be risky, controversial, imperfect, fabulous, complicated, political…I’ve been so lucky to get to work on Dear White People, Ballers and The Flight Attendant because I always felt like I could fire from all cylinders on day one. I did not need to ask for permission. I got to bring my entire self to each role. I got to curse. And kiss boys. And wear g-strings. And travel the world.

How do you use your experience acting in productions like The Flight Attendant to inform and influence your ideas on the stage?

I will always go back to the theater. I’m a theater kid. It’s where I honed my talent. So every experience that I have, I think about how I will translate that to the stage. I was lucky enough to travel the world and meet incredible people and see exotic places while we were shooting The Flight Attendant. I spent afternoons alone rummaging through the Bangkok market and got lost in the streets of Rome. I made friends with strangers and made peace with being a grown man and also homesick. As a writer, I’m a sponge. I soak up life and then look for an opportunity to let the water run out all over the stage.

How do you approach the assembly of a theatre show differently from how you approach the direction of a concert?

I approach concerts the exact same way that I approach theater. When I directed Shoshana Bean and Cynthia Erivo’s holiday concert at The Apollo, we had endless conversations about story and themes and vulnerability. All of those things make for an exciting night in the theater! I think a lot of concert directors only think about pyrotechnics, but I like to think about the heart of the performers. The message. The mission. And let all of those things spill out…and of course, we add some pyrotechnics, too!

How does your activism influence the projects you choose to be involved in or choose to create yourself?

Activism is such a sexy word these days. It seems like everyone claims to be. For me, my personal pledge is to be an activist when everyone’s looking, but more importantly when no one’s looking. That pledge always checks my motives and my ego as I navigate projects and stories that I want to be a part of it. Every time I sign on to a project, I bring my whole self, my whole truth, the parts that are great and the parts that are ugly. That’s what I’ve learned running a nonprofit for over 15 years. So much of the work is tough. It’s messy. But it’s real.

What are you most excited about with your career in the near future?

I’m currently developing a musical series with Ester Dean that will center black queer voices. It’s really exciting because I’m a fan of Ester and her work (Pitch Perfect, songwriter of Katy Perry’s “Firework” and Rihanna’s “Rude Boy”). She’s broken many ceilings in this industry as a songwriter, actor, musician, and host. We both want to create a show where young people (who look like Ester and I) will see their truths accurately and joyfully reflected on screen. I’m also directing a film called The Amish Project by a playwright named Jessica Dickey. When I tell people that I’m working on it, it can raise eyebrows because people don’t often hear about black directors working on pieces that don’t center black narratives. But here’s the thing: black directors want to direct EVERYTHING. And we can. And we will. And I’m excited to finally get my shot!

What is a creative role you haven’t taken up that you’d like to at some point in your career?

I really want to direct for TV. For some reason, the thought scares the hell out of me! There’s so much to manage: logistics, people, locations, safety, technology, performances, but I’m fascinated by it. It’s time for me to tackle that fear and get behind the camera ASAP. 

Jeff Langlois, Jaguar F Type R Dynamic, 2020, 360 MAGAZINE

Jaguar F-TYPE R-Dynamic

Written by Vaughn Lowery

Photos by Jeff Langlois

Since its inception in 2013, the Jaguar F-Type has been responsible for revolutionizing the sports car industry. With it’s obnoxious exhaust and robust styling, this has come to be one of the most sensual vehicles in the chronicle of the automobile industry.

Design

Reminiscent of an Aston Martin Vantage roadster, this vehicle is sleek and seductive. Caldera red exterior with scarlet red interior. The race-inspired seats cup your derrière with the same type of firmness which NFL players display once a teammate makes a touchdown. Everything along the dashboard is loaded and takes on a minimalist approach to decadence. Contrast stitching intertwined with ambient cabin lighting pushes the driver’s vision. You literally feel like you’re in the cockpit of a fighter jet. LED designer head and tail lamps add a touch of menace to the overall skeleton. 20″ inch wheels on this vehicle’s small frame screams Matchbox hot rod. The infamous R package is badged on the front, sides and back. The skirt, ground effects and active spoiler (which deploys at 70mph) give it an aggressive stance.

Technology

The F Type 10″ infotainment screen is bright and easy to use. With Bluetooth and navigation capabilities, permits the driver to feel even more linked up. 380 watt Meridian stereo system provides a premium sound which mimics an Arclight movie theater experience. Retractable vents on the instrument panel go flush once AC/heating is turned off. The climate control package comes with heated/cooled seats, heated steering wheel and windshield. For 2020, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and front parking sensors are now standard on this manikin.

Safety

With adequate sensors for the driver, lane departure and cruise control keep the vehicle tucked in between the lines of road every bit well as ample space away from vehicles while on extended road trips.

Performance

Behind the wheel of this enthusiast’s ride is a dream come true. The sports seats are outstanding for long distances. The 3.0L supercharged V6 AWD vehicle delivers 380hp and 339lb-ft torque. Agile, responsive and brawny are the best adjectives to describe the overall handling and Powertrain. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted. Of course, the torque vectoring and braking is on par with many of its competitors but nothing to boast about. Let’s face it, if you are seeking a rambunctious roller coaster ride, you may desire to blast out another 50,000 USD for the SVR. And, if you’re in the mood for a manual transmission, then this may not be the sleigh ride for you as it’s no longer offered on this crop.

In short, if you’re in the marketplace for a sybaritic yet sassy vixen that’s just under a 100,000 USD – then this is the car for you. Strong curb appeal, decent gas mileage (mpg: 23 city/30 highway) apace with enough amenities to keep a ‘gadget head’ feigning. The 2020 Jaguar F-Typer R-Dynamic is the benchmark for come-hither coupes, especially with all-wheel drive.

Pre-order.

Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce tops the list, featured in 11 different tunes by such artists as Future, The Weeknd, and Kodak Black. Ferrari is a close second. Chevrolet, Lamborghini, Bentley, Cadillac, Mercedes-Benz, and Porsche each get touts in several songs. Among non-car shout-outs, old standbys Hennessy cognac and Nike’s Air Jordan sneaker label got the most. We also found that it’s not just alcohol, guns, clothing, and super luxury making it into songs anymore—software, cookware, and even Band-Aids are making the grade.

As far as the song including the most name-checks, the crown goes to “Bad and Boujee” by hip-hop group Migos, which climbed all the way to the No. 1 spot on the charts early this year. It includes 19 brand mentions, from Instagram and Klout to Segway scooters and, um, Crock-Pot slow cookers. Car references are sprinkled throughout the song, too. They rap about a “lamb” and a “frog,” nods to Lamborghini and Porsche. There’s also a reference to the Ferrari 458 Spider, a drop-top convertible that costs more than a quarter-million dollars. The Rolls-Royce Ghost gets some attention as well.

The obvious question when musicians mention obscure brands is, are they getting paid? Sometimes they do. As with television shows and feature films, brands like to insert themselves into pop culture, and music is no different. Dozens of music videos show off stuff from Beats, the Jimmy Iovine/Dr. Dre headphones brand owned by Apple Inc. The item appears in several of Lady Gaga’s music videos, from her breakout hit “Just Dance” to “Poker Face” and “Telephone.” Beats Pill speakers, meanwhile, are clearly visible in videos from Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus, and Nicki Minaj.

It’s often unclear what’s a paid placement and what’s not, however, since artists generally don’t disclose the deals. No, Drake wasn’t paid by Rolls-Royce to include the Wraith in “Portland,” or its bigger and pricier cousin, the Phantom, in “Jumpman,” according to the manufacturer. But Chris Brown’s 2008 hit “Forever,” which featured the line “double your pleasure,” turned out to be an extended version of a chewing gum jingle for Wrigley’s Doublemint. 

(Photo Cred: Rebecca Smeyne —Billboard)

There’s a middle ground, however. Rolls-Royce, for example, will sometimes provide cars to be featured in music videos, said company spokesman Gerry Spahn. When someone uses the car as a shorthand for luxury, it helps the brand, he said. And besides, celebrities and musicians make up about 20 percent of the automaker’s customers, so it has the potential to be a sales strategy, too. 

The $400,000 Phantom is Rolls-Royce’s signature vehicle, but the company has attracted much hype for three other models it’s released since 2009: the Ghost, Wraith, and Dawn. All have garnered song mentions, with the Wraith topping the tally with four.
While parent company BMW AG keeps close tabs on the Rolls-Royce brand, Spahn said they’re more than happy for the exposure. Last year, Rolls-Royce had its second-highest sales numbers ever, delivering more than 4,000 cars to wealthy customers around the world. Even if the car’s desirability increased, production constraints limit the company to a maximum of 6,000 cars a year, said a person with knowledge of its operations.

(Source: BloombergPursuits)