Posts tagged with "gardens"

Botanical Garden via Maria soloman for use by 360 Magazine

Lilian Jackman Offers Gardening Advice in Dr. Hauschka Livestream

By: Skyler Johnson

There are many reasons to garden, but sometimes it can be so hard to keep your plants alive. They’ll often die before you can enjoy your harvest. Dr. Hauschka, a skincare brand, recently did a livestream with gardener Lilian Jackman, founder and owner of Wilder Hill Gardens, in Conway, Massachusetts. She gave the following advice:

Don’t Overwater

One of the easiest ways to kill plants is to overwater them. People tend to think that their herbs and vegetables need as much water as they can get but that’s not true. Plants, like other creatures, have a limit to how much water they need. Jackman recommended only watering when the ground is dry. That way, you know they’re getting the perfect amount of water they need without getting too much. 

Bring Plants Inside for the Winter

It’s important to bring some plants inside for winter, as they will be able to stay alive in the proper conditions. She encourages people to keep plants in pots for easy transport during the winter. She also recommended getting full-spectrum UV bulbs, as they will help to give plants the light they need, and will also be visually appealing. As far as what plants should go inside, you have to know which environment they came from. She uses the example of rosemary: a Mediterranean plant. Because rosemary is Mediterranean, you should store it in an environment most similar to that environment – which for her, in Massachusetts, meant indoors. 

Think Like a Plant

Plants will communicate a lot with you, if you can understand them. If you’re giving plants too much water, they will droop. Observing the “behavior” of your plants can go a long way in determining how successful your garden will be. 

Add Diversity

Jackman recommends using three to four plants per pot – each of different sizes, styles, and characteristics. Different plants require different nutrients, and with more plant variety, more nutrients will be utilized. Also, variety makes your pot or planter more visually stimulating.  

Enjoy the Fruit of your Labor

One thing Jackman really stressed was utilizing the plants in your diet. If you have vegetables, pick and enjoy them. If you have herbs, use them in your food. It’s important to appreciate every aspect of the gardening process, especially the end results.

Ivory Rowen, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE

Heckfield Place Reopens

England’s Heckfield Place Reopens July Fourth

Heckfield Place, the country-house hotel less than an hour from London, will reopen on July 4. Set in its own 438-acre estate of ancient woods, lakes, working farmland and gardens, the 18th-century Georgian House will once again welcome guests. “We’ve obviously had to make some changes to address the coronavirus era,” says General Manager, Olivia Richli, “and the closure and required protocols have challenged us to come up with some lovely creative concepts.”

There are many safety protocols enforced as the beautiful hotel reopens. One development is that guests can choose to enjoy Culinary Director Skye Gyngell’s delicious cuisine not only at socially-distanced tables in the Marle and Hearth restaurants, but with picnics and BBQs out and about the grounds. In addition, the hotel staff will be wearing chic masks as they greet and serve guests. Luggage will be brought to guests’ rooms and then sanitized as the guests watch. One small change is that guests will be asked to bring their own Wellington Boots if they plan to tramp through the woods – as Heckfield Place’s boot supply is off-limits during the pandemic. Another change is that exercise classes will be held in the open air instead of indoors.

Fortunately, many of the exciting events hosted at the hotel will continue. “The hotel’s elegant cinema will be open for guests on July 4, and our curated series of lectures, talks, performances and demonstrations, known as ‘The Assembly,’ will resume in September,” Richli continued; “our team will be leading guided runs and bike rides and even I will also be leading an idle bike ride once a week to enable guests to explore the lovely extent of the countryside surrounding the estate.”

From July 4 through December 19, 2020, Heckfield Place will be offering a new Safe Haven package for guests who want to escape to nature for an extended stay and enjoy the solitude of the estate’s sprawling grounds, which even when the hotel is at full occupancy, affords all guests a minimum of 4.8 acres to themselves. The offer includes seven nights in a Chamber Room (or any higher room category) for the price of only five nights. And for families and large groups interested in renting out the entire house for a week or more, there is also a new exclusive-use offer that can be booked by contacting the Heckfield Place reservations department directly. For more information about Heckfield Place, visit: www.heckfieldplace.com

About Heckfield Place:

A Georgian family home dating to the 1700s, Heckfield Place has been lovingly restored to its classic origins and rewoven into its surrounding 400 acres of farmland, ancient heather and woodlands. The estate’s farm, two walled gardens and orchards nourish renowned chef Skye Gyngell’s epicurean cuisine, bringing the outside gloriously into the property’s three restaurants–Marle, with its outdoor balcony overlooking the property, the Sun House, a unique space for up to 30 guests in the Upper Walled Garden, and the open-flamed Hearth. Aiming to be as sustainable as possible, the estate has a biomass energy center to power hotel water and central heating; an aerobic digester to process all recyclable waste and provide compost for the garden and pellets for the biomass energy center; harvests rainwater and captures spring water. As part of the Assembly, the hotel’s event rooms can host up to 120 guests and the new state-of-the-art, Dolby Atmos surround sound cinema can accommodate 67 viewers. There is also an extensive wine cellar and tasting room, as well as the full service Little Bothy Spa.

Kusama, NYBG, Cosmic Nature, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

Yayoi Kusama x New York Botanical Garden

New Work by Celebrated Japanese Artist Yayoi Kusama  The New York Botanical Garden Announces Highlights of 2020 Exhibition

KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature, Featuring New Work by Celebrated Japanese Artist Yayoi Kusama

On view May 9‒November 1, 2020. Tickets go on sale February 26, at nybg.org/kusama 

The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) has announced highlights of its expansive 2020 exhibition KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature, featuring work by internationally celebrated Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama (b. 1929), including new experiences and immersive installations, four of which will debut at the Botanical Garden. NYBG is the exclusive venue for KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature. On view May 9 through November 1, 2020, the exhibition will be installed in and around the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, across the Garden’s 250 acres, and in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library Building.

Tickets for the landmark presentation go on sale February 26, 2020, at nybg.org/kusama. Visitors to New York can easily reach the exhibit in 20 minutes from Grand Central Terminal in Midtown via Metro North to the Botanical Garden Station. They can also take advantage of the Exclusive Grand Hyatt New York Hotel & Ticket Package. The property is located next to Grand Central and visitors can book online at grandhyattnewyork.com, using the code NYBG. They’ll receive 10% off the nightly room rate at Grand Hyatt New York, two round-trip Metro-North Railroad tickets to NYBG and two KUSAMA All-Garden Pass tickets.

New Kusama Works Debut

The exhibition reveals Kusama’s lifelong fascination with the natural world beginning in her childhood spent in the greenhouses and fields of her family’s Nakatsutaya seed nursery. Multiple installations will be on view, including her signature mirrored environments and organic forms, colossal polka-dotted sculptures of flora, and mesmerizing paintings of plants and flowers and their diversity of colors and patterns. Several of these works are newly completed and will be shown along with archival works that have never been publicly exhibited, and more that will be on view for the first time in the United States.

Among the new works debuting are: Flower Obsession (2020), Kusama’s first-ever obliteration greenhouse where visitors apply coral flower stickers throughout the interior; Dancing Pumpkin (2020), a monumental, 16-foot-high sculpture presented on the Haupt Conservatory Lawn; Infinity Mirrored Room—Illusion Inside the Heart (2020), an immersive outdoor installation responding to changing light throughout the day and seasons; and, I Want to Fly to the Universe (2020), a brightly colored, 13-foot-high biomorphic form with a yellow face and polka dots.

Complementing the artworks on view, Garden horticulturists will create spectacular in- and outdoor displays through the seasons. Glorious displays of tulips and irises in spring transform into masses of pumpkins and autumnal flowers in fall. Kusama’s plant-inspired polka-dotted sculptures will be installed across the Garden in dialogue with meadow grasses, bellflowers, water lilies, and other plantings. In the Conservatory, stunning floral presentations will bring one of Kusama’s paintings on view in the Library Building to life through a seasonal progression of violas, salvias, zinnias, chrysanthemums, and other colorful annuals. In fall, displays of meticulously trained kiku (Japanese for “chrysanthemum” and one of the country’s most heralded fall-flowering plants) will create a dramatic finale for the exhibition.

Sketchbooks, Paintings & Polka Dots

The Exhibition will include works from throughout Kusama’s prolific career and multifaceted practice. On display in the Mertz Library Building, her sketchbooks from adolescence signal the beginning of Kusama’s connection with the natural world that has inspired her aesthetic and practice across mediums. This early work also portends avant-garde ideas she developed while living in New York between 1958 and 1973, as a contemporary of Joseph Cornell, Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, and Claes Oldenburg, and continues to explore rigorously today. The Library Building presentation will also feature examples of her botanical sketches, paintings, works on paper, biomorphic collages, assemblages, and recent soft sculpture and canvas works depicting flora and their limitless variety of patterns. Life (2015) provides an immersive experience as visitors navigate a circular space enclosing polka-dotted forms with mosaic surfaces. Pumpkins Screaming About Love Beyond Infinity (2017) comprises a mirrored cube reflecting an infinity of polka-dotted pumpkins. It is accompanied by a statement by the artist that reads, in part, “My pumpkins, beloved of all the plants in the world. When I see pumpkins, I cannot efface the joy of them being my everything, nor the awe I hold them in.”

Public Programs   

KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature will be accompanied by a roster of public programs for all ages, including lectures; film screenings of Kusama Infinity (2018) and Kusama’s Self-Obliteration (1967); fun-filled Polka Dot Picnics in spring; and Pumpkin Power Weekends in October with activities amid thousands of pumpkins of myriad shapes and sizes. Artist-designed merchandise will be available for purchase at NYBG Shop and there will be special Kusama- inspired menu items offered in the Hudson Garden Grill and Pine Tree Café. The KUSAMA All-Garden Pass ticket includes access to the LuEsther T. Mertz Library Building, Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, Flower Obsession (2020) obliteration greenhouse, and garden features, including the Rock Garden, Tram Tour, Everett Children’s Adventure Garden, and grounds. The KUSAMA All-Garden Pass + Infinity Mirrored Room ticket includes KUSAMA All-Garden Pass access, plus timed entry to the Infinity Mirrored Room—Illusion Inside the Heart immersive outdoor installation. Tickets go on sale for NYBG Patrons and Members on February 19, 2020, and to the general public on February 26, 2020.

Visit nybg.org/kusama for additional ticketing information and pricing and to sign up for e-mail alerts on the exhibition.  The New York Botanical Garden is a museum of plants located at Bronx River Parkway (Exit 7W) and Fordham Road. It is easy to reach by Metro-North Railroad, bus, or subway. The Garden is open year- round, Tuesday through Sunday and Monday federal holidays, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, please call 718.817.8700 or visit nybg.org The New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, New York 10458

LongHouse Reserve, East Hampton, 360 MAGAZINE

LongHouse Reserve

LONGHOUSE RESERVE AWARDED $46,756.50 GRANT FROM THE

ROBERT DAVID LION GARDINER FOUNDATION FOR OUTDOOR ART EXHIBITS

LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton has been awarded a $46,756.50 grant from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation. The purpose of the grant is to allow LongHouse to expand its reach into the Eastern Long Island community and beyond with outstanding and affordable cultural and historical experiences. These community outreach efforts center on the undeserved members of the local towns of the East End, primarily the immigrant population and their children. The grant directly assists in defraying rising costs in LongHouse’s Public Art in the Gardens Program, including costs associated with art acquisition, installation, marketing and outreach. 

LongHouse’s Executive Director, Matko Tomicic, says, “A grant from the Gardiner Foundation is a vote of confidence in LongHouse Reserve’s mission to illuminate the unique natural setting and artistic environment that has nurtured and inspired world renowned artists. It is a distinctive cultural designation for the region, nation and the world.”

Public Art in the Gardens is LongHouse Reserve’s year-long exhibition, the cornerstone of the art, garden and educational initiatives. It is open to the public in April and runs through December 2019. Each year, some of the art in the permanent collection is moved to different locations in the garden, providing a fresh perspective and renewed enjoyment to visitors. New art on loan from museums, galleries, artists and collectors is placed throughout the garden. Most of the art is in place for the Rites of Spring Season Opener in April. The placement and installation of the sculpture, often massive in size, is one of LongHouse’s biggest tasks and challenges. 

LongHouse strives to offer the local community programming at little or no cost. Year round programs that benefit from the grant include Rites of Spring, the LongHouse season opener; Family Day, a large community outreach event; Educational Programming, in which over 3,000 schoolchildren visit LongHouse Reserve annually with teachers free of charge; the Student Annual, an art competition that is open to kindergarten through 12th grade students throughout Long Island; Hand in Hand Treasure Hunt, an activity that drives growth of children visiting LongHouse; Garden Programming, or tours of the gardens, and Collaborative Relationships, such as partnerships with other cultural institutions. 

LongHouse uses its website, newsletter, and email marketing to reach its target population. The vibrant social media presence keeps visitors updated on happenings, events, and education programs. LongHouse reaches out to the undeserved members of the community with informal talks, flyers (printed in English and Spanish) and complimentary guest passes to be used during open days. LongHouse has formed an alliance with an English as a Second Language class and offers students and families complimentary bilingual tours. More than half the children who visit LongHouse are from Hispanic and African American households. Outreach events are added to all local media calendars and are featured in newspapers such as The East Hampton Star, The Independent, East Hampton Press, and Newsday. 

About The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation

The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, established in 1987, primarily supports the study of New York State history. Robert David Lion Gardiner was, until his death in August 2004, the 16th Lord of the Manor of Gardiner’s Island, NY. The Gardiner family and their descendants have owned Gardiner’s Island since 1639, obtained as part of a royal grant from King Charles I of England. The Foundation is inspired by Robert David Lion Gardiner’s personal passion for New York history.

About LongHouse Reserve 

Long House Reserve in East Hampton, NY exemplifies living with art in all forms. Its collections, gardens, sculpture and programs reflect world cultures and inspire creative life. LongHouse Reserve was founded by Jack Lenor Larsen, internationally known textile designer, author and collector. His home, LongHouse, was built as a case study to exemplify a creative approach to contemporary life. Mr. Larsen believes visitors experiencing art in living spaces have a unique learning experience – more meaningful than the best media.

LongHouse Reserve
133 Hands Creek Road
East Hampton, NY  11937
info@longhouse.org
www.longhouse.org

 

The Health Benefits of Green Spaces

5 Health Benefits of Our Green Spaces

Studies show that green space and landscaping contribute to health, happiness, and intellect.

Many people spend their time, money, and effort improving their properties and some choose to get into DIY garden landscaping to save money. While countless benefits of DIY landscaping does to your health, there are also disadvantages when it comes to time commitment and spending more on investing in equipment, but it is truly a matter of personal choice. If you choose to hire a landscaping professional then you should choose a company that provides a quote or price estimate even if they have to send somebody out to visit your home and see how well specific design elements might work. There’s a long list of landscaping companies, but if you are somewhere in Miami FL area, you can find valuable information when you visit https://bestofmachinery.com/us/fl/miami/landscaper.

It’s natural to long for spring when it’s cold outside. But did you know, there’s a good reason why you may pine for green? Living landscapes are an important part of the outdoor lifestyle that Americans enjoy, but the benefits go beyond the barbeque and backyard baseball. Green spaces are necessary for your health.

“The advantages of grass and landscaping surpass the usual physical benefits that result from outdoor activity,” said Kris Kiser, president and CEO, Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI). “Numerous studies have found that people who spend more time outside or are exposed to living landscapes are happier, healthier and smarter.”

Researchers have studied the impact of nature on human well-being for years, but recent studies have found a more direct correlation between human health, particularly related to stress, and the importance of people’s access to nature and managed landscapes.

Getting dirty is actually good for you. Soil is the new Prozac, according to Dr. Christopher Lowry, a neuroscientist at the University of Bristol in England. Mycobacterium vaccae in soil mirrors the effect on neurons that Prozac provides. The bacterium stimulates serotonin production, which explains why people who spend time gardening and have direct contact with soil feel more relaxed and happier.

Children who are raised on farms in a “dirtier” environment than an urban setting not only have a stronger immune system but are also better able to manage social stress, according to the National Academy of Sciences.

Living near living landscapes can improve your mental health. Researchers in England found that people moving to greener areas experienced an immediate improvement in mental health that was sustained for at least three years after they moved. The study also showed that people relocating to a more developed area suffered a drop in mental health.

Greening of vacant urban areas in Philadelphia reduced feelings of depression by 41.5% and reduced poor mental health by 62.8% for those living near the vacant lots, according to a study by a research team.

Green spaces can make you healthier too. People who live within a half mile of green space (such parks, public gardens, and greenways) were found to have a lower incidence of fifteen diseases by Dutch researchers — including depression, anxiety, heart disease, diabetes, asthma and migraines.

A 2015 study found that people living on streets with more trees had a boost in heart and metabolic health. Studies show that tasks conducted under the calming influence of nature are performed better and with greater accuracy, yielding a higher quality result. Spending time in gardens, for instance, can improve memory performance and attention span by 20%.

Living landscapes make you smarter. Children gain attention and working memory benefits when they are exposed to greenery, says a study led by Payam Dadvand of the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology in Barcelona. In addition, exposure to natural settings may be widely effective in reducing attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in children.

This applies to adults as well. Research has also shown that being around plants helps you concentrate better at home and at work. Charlie Hall, Ellison Chair in International Floriculture believes that spending time in gardens can improve attention span and memory performance by as much as 20 percent.

A National Institute of Health study found that adults demonstrate significant cognitive gains after going on a nature walk. In addition, a Stanford University study found that walking in nature, rather than a concrete-oriented, urban environment, resulted in decreased anxiety, rumination, and negative affect, and produced cognitive benefits, such as increased working memory performance.

Living landscapes help you heal faster. Multiple studies have discovered that plants in hospital recovery rooms or views of aesthetically-pleasing gardens help patients heal up to one day faster than those who are in more sterile or austere environments.

Physicians are now prescribing time outdoors for some patients, according to recent reports. Park Rx America is a non-profit with a mission to encourage physicians to prescribe doses of nature.

All of these benefits reinforce the importance of maintaining our yards, parks and other community green spaces. Trees, shrubs, grass, and flowering plants are integral to human health. Not only do they provide a place for kids and pets to play, they directly contribute to our mental and physical well-being.

More information can be found at www.SaveLivingLandscapes.com

Freewheel Holidays

Curious about castles? A UK company specializing in self-guided bicycle vacations throughout Europe offers itineraries from Italy to Denmark that reveal secrets of courtly lives on the other side of the moat.

Freewheel Holidays’ self-guided tours include, among others, inn and/or bed and breakfast accommodations, bike rental, luggage transfers, route maps and notes, services of a tour host including welcome and information talk.

France is first up on Freewheel Holidays’ castle-driven itineraries. Cyclists can tour the Paris royal countryside – think Fontainebleau — on a six-day Paris to Versailles adventure at £909 per person double. Departures are from April through October. One lunch stop is the Castle of Vaux le Vicomte of Blandy, a rare example of medieval architecture. The 17th century Castle de Courances opens onto magnificent grounds including a water park. Étampes (Royal City) dates to the 7th century. Fontainebleau with over 1,500 rooms boasts eight centuries of continuous occupation by sovereigns. In the royal city of Dourdan is the early 13th century Château de Dourdan. The Château de Rambouillet began life as a fortified manor in the 14th century. This trip concludes with a visit to the masterpiece of Louis XIV, Versailles, one of the most beautiful achievements of 18th-century French art. More details here.

Dordogne Villages and Castles is an eight-day program from £749 per person double. Departures are mid March through mid October. Here are Château de Losse and gardens near the Lascaux pre-historic caves. In this archaeologically rich region is the château village of Beynac perched upon a cliff. Château de Caudon dates to Louis XVI. Along the Dordogne River are Château de Monfort and Château de Gourdon. More details here.

A seven-day tour, Loire Valley Castles, is from £599 per person double. Departures are from late April to late September. Steeped in history, Amboise is a market town celebrated for Château de Chenonceau that has spanned the river here since the 16th century. Château du Clos Lucé was home to Leonardo for three years and where some of his remarkable inventions are on display. Along the Loire are, among others, the 17th century Château de Cheverny and Château Royal de Blois in a community dating to the 6th century. Romantic castles surrounded by fields of wheat and poppy include Fougères-sur-Biévre and the Renaissance Château de Beauregard. Chambord is one of the most famous and majestic of the Loire castles. More details here.

The United Kingdom offers this stunner, a six-day Stamford to Lincoln cycling tour that visits Belvoir Castle that has gone through four iterations dating to 12th century Norman ruins; William the Conqueror’s 11th century edifice, Lincoln Castle; and Burghley, one of England’s greatest 16th century houses. The per person double rate is £699. Departures are available mid-April to the end September. More details here.

Two castle tours in Denmark include the eight-day Funen Fairytale Island tour available at £979 per person double from now through end August. Often referred to as the garden of Denmark, it is the birthplace of Hans Christian Andersen and home to the 16th century Castle Egeskov, hosting a fine collection of old cars, airplanes and bicycles. More details here.

On the eight-day Copenhagen and Zealand Circuit cyclists explore the castle of Gavnø, dating to the late 12th or early 13th century. Grounds here sport over half a million bulbs, a rose garden and many rare plants and trees. An immersion in Viking lore reveals 10th century Trelleborg, one of seven known ring castles and the best rebuilt castle of the Viking period in Denmark. Cathedral of Roskilde is the place where most of Denmark’s kings and dynasties have their graves. Guests may also visit the Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen. Per person double rates are from £829. More details here.

In Austria a seven-day Innsbruck to Salzburg tour is from £649 per person double with departures from end April to early October. High atop a hill in Salzburg, the city of Mozart, is Hohensalzburg Castle, a fortress dating to 1077. More details here.

In Italy,Freewheel Holiday’s Milan to Lake Como is a four-day tour from £259 per person double. Departures are early April to end October. The 14th century Castle of Trezzo sull’Adda is on a site occupied once by the Celts and overlooking a landscape that fascinated Leonardo da Vinci. More details here.

To check trip availability, make reservations, or to find out more about Freewheel Holidays’ leisure cycling tours call +44 (0) 161 703 5823, email info@freewheelholidays.com or visit website.

Follow Freewheel Holidays on Social Media

Twitter:@FreewheelHols

Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/FWHolidays

Google+:http://plus.google.com/+FreewheelholidaysCoUk

About Freewheel Holidays

A division of Sports Tours International, Freewheel Holidays specializes in self-guided, expertly supported European cycling holidays that strike the perfect balance between leisure pedaling and immersive sightseeing. The company offers easy cycling programs designed with special appeal to European and North American travelers. Guests cycle on their own, with enroute assistance and distinctive accommodations expertly chosen and secured by the company. A portfolio of over 40 established European holidays offers riders of all levels a freedom of choice. The company features a range of 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9-night itineraries to 12 European countries including the UK, Austria, France, Holland, Czech Republic, Italy, Malta, Switzerland, Spain, Germany, Sweden and Portugal. The majority of tours are self-guided with the exception of a few fully-guided vacation packages in Croatia, France, Italy and Prague to Vienna. The company also offers family-focused, coastal, wine lover, bike and boat, and solo traveler holidays.

NYRP 21st Annual Hulaween Event

SAVE THE DATE! 

Bette Midler’s New York Restoration Project to Host 21st Annual Hulaween Event

October 30th at NYC’s Majestic Cathedral of St. John the Divine

JOIN NYRP FOUNDER BETTE MIDLERMUSICAL GUEST JON BON JOVI & FRIENDS, AND SPECIAL GUEST DITA VON TEESE

As one of the City’s Most Iconic Cathedrals Transforms Into a Garden of Earthly Delights!

*HOSTED BY COMEDIENNE JUDY GOLD, WITH COSTUME JUDGE MICHAEL KORS & MUSIC BY DJ RUNNA*

 

Evening Will Honor 

Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman Alphabet, Inc. and David Evans Shaw, Managing Partner, Black Point Group

     

   

 

New York Restoration Project (NYRP), founded by award-winning singer, entertainer, actress and green activist Bette Midler, will celebrate over two decades of beautifying New York’s urban environment with its annual Halloween party, Hulaween. On Monday, October 30th, one of New York City’s most iconic cathedrals – Cathedral of St. John the Divine – will be transformed into a Garden of Earthly Delights, brought to life by mastermind Douglas Little, the visual storyteller behind Bergdorf Goodman’s most spectacular windows. Dita Von Teese will perform one of her signature burlesque pieces during the cocktail hour.Comedienne Judy Gold is the host for the evening, which will feature special entertainment by Jon Bon Jovi & Friends. Fashion Phenom Michael Kors will once again judge the always popular costume contest, and DJ Runna will provide music throughout the night. This year’s honorees are Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman – Alphabet, Inc. and David Evans Shaw, Managing Partner, Black Point Group, both of whom exhibit exemplary environmental stewardship and the ability to affect innovative change.


Tickets and more info can be found by calling Buckley Hall Events, 914-579-1000

 

ABOUT NEW YORK RESTORATION PROJECT

New York Restoration Project (NYRP) is a non-profit organization driven by the conviction that all New Yorkers deserve beautiful, high-quality public space within ready walking distance of their homes. Since its founding in 1995 by Bette Midler, NYRP has planted trees, renovated gardens, restored parks, and transformed open space for communities throughout New York City’s five boroughs. As New York’s only citywide conservancy, NYRP brings private resources to spaces that lack adequate municipal support, fortifying the City’s aging infrastructure and creating a healthier environment for those who live in the most densely populated and least green neighborhoods. To learn more, please visit http://www.nyrp.org .