Posts tagged with "Stay at Home"

360 MAGAZINE illustration for online gaming by Symara Briel Wilson

Travelling Tips from the Experts

When this epidemic is done and travel resumes, where do you want to head? Make your dreams a reality with our travel tips to start you on the road to greatness.

So, Done any Good Travelling Lately? 

No, it may not be the best time for any overseas, or even local, travel. And the rest of the year will probably not see much of an improvement with this pandemic around. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t keep dreaming, right? 

The great thing about travel is that all these fantastic places that you’ve been longing to see are not going anywhere. And just like those beautiful sights, sounds and smells, the fact that travelling costs money isn’t changing either. We can’t all be lucky enough to have a job like my friend Stan, who travels the world on income made from the fastest payout online casino he bets on, and which you can read more about here https://new-casino.ca/articles/fast-payout. Though that does sound tempting.

For the rest of us, we need to save, to scrimp and maybe even to borrow to fund our dreams. But that’s OK, because we have a whole host of travelling experience here in the office, and we’re more than happy to share all our tips to get you in the traveling zone.

Money, Money, Money!

Those sexy Swedes were right about one thing; it’s a rich man’s world. Travelling is going to cost you a pretty penny and saving up is the first thing that you need to be doing. Look at it this way; every sacrifice you make before you go is another cool thing you can spend your coin on when you’re away. And trust us, you won’t regret it.

The silver lining to a pandemic is that you’re more limited than usual to find all those exciting things that you normally spend your money on. No more concerts, no more dinners out, no more buying rounds of shots for the entire bar of strangers every weekend. Yes, it sucks, don’t get me wrong, but you need to look for the positive in a bad situation sometimes.

So, instead of seeing all that money building up in your bank account and spending it on Amazon, save, save, save. Then spend your time researching all the amazing places you’re going to visit in New Zealand or Peru or Cambodia or wherever your first trip will take you.

Do Your Research

Many are used to flying by the seat of their pants when they are touring the world. And we’re not for a second implying that that’s not a good idea, not essential for the soul sometimes. But all too often, we’ve come back from a trip only to find that when we decided to drive 8 hours inland to see that wicked cave system, we missed one of the very things we went all that way to see.

It’s a great idea to ensure that the time you’re planning on going (not that it’s a great time to book anything into any calendar right now!) is good weather wise too. Koh Samui is not that great when there’s flooding from the monsoon season in October, trust us. 

Travel guides are easily accessible online these days, like Lonely Planet and even Trip Adviser. And online searches of the country’s official tourism page is definitely advisable too.

Start Making a List

Now you’ve started looking into all the cool things to do, start making a list of the things you definitely don’t want to miss. Also, make a note of them on a map so you can start to get a good feel for where they are in relationship to each other. Not only is it good to slowly start to navigate your way around the country, but it’s perfect to start seeing things that are in between. 

Hopping from one place to the next is always relatively easy via public transport or tourist buses, so you’ll be able to visit that awesome lake on your way to the glaciers, or that pristine beach, or the forest your friends keep going on about.

Referring back to your list whilst you’re on your journey will make sure that those last minute detours won’t cost you an even better surprise. 

Learn a Little of the Lingo

Just a simple “good morning” in the local language will break down social barriers faster than money can buy. And it’s just as important as “thank you”, which you may never use in your everyday life anymore, but will open so many more doors on your travels. Oh, and it works wonders when you smile at the same time.

Language goes hand in hand with local cultures too, so when you’re learning when Ramadan is for your Egypt trip, delve a little into the customs and rules that coincide with it. Again, so important when it comes to mixing with the locals. You may just find yourself at the dinner table in the middle of the street, breaking bread with the entire community who have had all the food supplied by the wealthier tenants. Now that’s a story to tell your friends.

Balance Your Guard with Common Sense

Now we’d be the last to say that nothing ever happens when you’re travelling, no one gets in any trouble in Sudan. But if you don’t let your guard down just a little, you may as well just read the guide books and stay on your sofa. The paranoia that you’re a constant target will leave you with regrets when you get back home. So, play it safe but don’t forget why you’re there.

Paying too much for the fruit at a street stall or being ripped off on that $8 sarong is not worth battering an eye at. Instead, go with the flow and focus more on local scams that will matter. Checking with the front office crew about which bars to avoid, the areas that are notorious for pick pockets and how safe the subway is at night are things worth worrying about. 

Being smart about how you hold your bag, where your valuable are and what’s going on around you whilst you’re in the marketplace, is better than avoiding that culture at all. You’ll only travel there once, trust me, so make it count. 

Naomi Campbell Interviews Cynthia Ervio

Naomi Campbell returns with an exclusive episode of her popular YouTube series featuring special guest Cynthia Ervio.

International supermodel, activist and philanthropist Naomi Campbell welcomes Emmy, Grammy and Tony Award-Winning Actor, singer and songwriter Cynthia Erivo to “No Filter with Naomi” – a limited-time series beneath her highly popular “Being Naomi” YouTube channel. The intimate, live streamed series has invited fans to #stayhome and save lives during this critical time and has focused on in-depth, career spanning conversations between Naomi and a close group of her friends including: designers, musicians, actors, beauty gurus and media personalities.

The series debuted on April 6th and has since featured guests Cindy Crawford, Marc Jacobs, Nicole Richie, Ashley Graham, Pierpaolo PiccoliLee Daniels, Christy Turlington, Adut Akech, Sharon Stone, Paris Hilton, Serena Williams and Venus Williams, Karlie Kloss, Anna WintourSean “Diddy” Combs and Jackie Aina. 

The “No Filter with Naomi” series returned after hiatus on June 23rd and featured a select group of episodes focused on impactful conversations dedicated to #BlackLivesMatter, social justice issues, racial and human inequalities. These critical conversations, reflective of our times, included featured guests: Opal Tometi, Rev. Al Sharpton, Alphonso Reed, Cleo Wade, Bethann Hardison, Tyler Mitchell, Indya Moore, Chase Strangio, and Tori Cooper.

Streaming live on Naomi Campbell’s YouTube Channel. View all “No Filter with Naomi” episodes here. 

Bottled Beer illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Natty Light – Dorm from Home

As universities across the country announce campus closures to enact social distancing, droves of 21+ college students are facing a harsh reality; the semester they dreamed of won’t be happening. Natural Light knows how crushing this is for our fans, so we’re stepping in to help preserve some of the freedoms of on-campus living. The Dorm From Home initiative awards one lucky 21+ student with a “Nattified” mobile dorm unit. The dorm comes equipped with all the college staples and a space to call their own while they sit out another semester.

21+ college students across America will face hundreds of hours of digital lectures and exams this semester without a sanctuary to relax and step away from their studies. With the college experience hanging in the balance, Natty Light created a solution that delivers the independence of the college experience without ever leaving home.

The Dorm From Home mobile unit will be parked right in your backyard or driveway and comes

equipped with all the college classics:

  • Flat screen TV
  • Heat/AC/Electric
  • Mini fridge
  • Lax volume policies
  • Gaming system
  • Other people optional
  • Chill vibes included
  • A semester’s worth of Natty Light beer
  • money to enjoy responsibly*

“Having to miss a semester on-campus is a devastating feeling for our fans,” said Daniel Blake, Vice President of US Value Brands at Anheuser-Busch. “We could never replace the full experience, but Dorm From Home will give a piece of the college lifestyle back to one lucky fan and more importantly, it’s a reminder to the full Natty community that the college experience is worth celebrating, no matter where you are.”

For the chance to win, fans 21+ can post a photo on social with #DormFromHome and #contest to make the case why they deserve their own space this semester to dorm from home. Natty will select a winner based on the most creative and convincing argument that reflects the Natty Light personality and values.

The winner will receive their decked out mobile home to their doorstep at the start of the fall semester and will be theirs to keep.

No Purchase Necessary. Open to US residents who are 21+ and who are currently enrolled in an accredited college or university in the US or who were enrolled in an accredited college or university in the US within two (2) years prior to the time of entry. Ends 8/18/20. See Official Rules at naturallight.com/dorm-from-home for prize & details. Msg & data rates may apply. Void where prohibited. *Cash equivalent of 2 cases a month for 3 months

Natural Light was introduced in 1977 as Anheuser-Busch’s first reduced-calorie light beer. Currently the sixth best-selling beer in America, Natural Light is brewed with a blend of premium hops and a combination of select grains producing a clean flavor, light body and satisfying refreshment.

For more than 165 years, Anheuser-Busch has carried on a legacy of brewing great-tasting, high-quality beers that have satisfied beer drinkers for generations. Today, we own and operate 23 breweries, 14 distributorships and 23 agricultural and packaging facilities, and have more than 18,000 colleagues across the United States. We are home to several of America’s most recognizable beer brands, including Budweiser, Bud Light, Michelob ULTRA and Stella Artois, as well as a number of regional brands that provide beer drinkers with a choice of the best-tasting craft beers in the industry. From responsible drinking programs and emergency drinking water donations to industry-leading sustainability efforts, we are guided by our unwavering commitment to supporting the communities we call home. 

Follow Natural Light: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Follow Anheuser-Busch: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

NYC COVID-19 Mortality Zeros Out

By Katrina Tiktinsky

New York City celebrated an enormous moment of progress on June 12th, as the COVID-19 related mortality count hit zero for the first time since March.

Following a period of strict regulations and a cautious initiation of the phased reopening process, New York has transformed from the global epicenter of the virus to a model for pandemic response. Governor Cuomo initiated a shelter-in-place strategy, issuing a prolonged stay-at-home order to limit social contact. This measure effectively flattened the curve of infections, unburdening hospitals in NYC and the larger tri-state area.

The city has suffered over 200,000 cases, over 50,000 hospitalizations, and around 20,000 mortalities from the novel coronavirus. New York’s battle with the pandemic is not over, but the success embodied by this week’s milestone points to hope for the country at large, should other states follow similar safety measures.

As the federal government pushes aggressively for what experts warn would be a dangerously premature reopening of the country, New York has ideologically differentiated itself. The city has taken a steady approach, recognizing that the economy cannot thrive without healthy citizens. Wear your mask, keep your distance, do your part.

Tips to Control Food Cravings When Stuck at Home

We’ve all felt hunger. It’s the sensation we get when we want to eat food. It’s a physiological mechanism designed to tell us when we need to have sustenance. However, in the Western world, food is in plentiful supply all around us and our interpretation of hunger has become confused.

Broadly speaking, hunger can be viewed in two ways. Firstly, physiological, also known as stomach or true hunger, is where you are genuinely hungry because you feel low in energy and haven’t eaten for a long time. In other words, your body needs food. Secondly, psychological, or mouth hunger, is where you fancy something to eat. This is when you have a craving.

What are cravings?

Cravings can lead to a preoccupation with food. We want food, especially ‘bad’ foods, more than we did before. When we restrict ourselves from eating the foods we desire, it can have a bad effect on our mood. This increases temptation and when you then eat something you’re craving, you enjoy it even more. This can cause a negative cycle of mood changes that lead you to want to snack more, and then you recognize the intense pleasure next time you have a craving. Cravings become harder to curb.

Food triggers

The trap continues. Just thinking about food triggers the behavior you want to avoid, i.e. eating. It’s especially hard as food is constantly around us, especially as we are spending more time than ever at home. It’s such an important part of our social lives, we see advertisements for tasty foods everywhere, and it’s frequently the topic of conversation. None of this is helped when your always around family and they may be snacking around you when you’re trying not to think about food. Harder still, we often use food as a reward. We treat ourselves, and junk food is a frequent reward of choice!

How to curb cravings

The nutrition team at Huel (Huel.com), the world’s best-selling complete nutrition brand, has put together a list of a few practical tips to help you curb your cravings. As you take control of your cravings, over time you’ll realize that you don’t actually need the food that you’re craving, it’s just a mindset. The frequency, duration and intensity of the cravings will soon diminish.

Eat regular meals and stick to a schedule – get into the habit of not skipping meals even if you are trying to be ‘good’ or because you feel guilty about what you ate earlier.

Listen to your body – eat regularly and only when you are genuinely hungry. Learn the difference between physiological and psychological hunger.

Identify what’s causing your cravings – keep food and feelings diary by jotting down what you eat and when, and how you feel before and afterward. This may help you identify triggers and problem times of the day, and to recognize if you’re snacking for comfort, boredom or loneliness.

Find a hobby or interest – if you are snacking for comfort, eating will not make the problem go away. Do something to occupy yourself to avoid nibbling. Try chatting with a friend, exercising, watching a movie, or having a relaxing bath.

Make eating a separate activity – many people snack while doing certain things, and consequently, the activity then becomes a signal for a craving. For example, watching TV and snacking, eating popcorn at the movies. To curb this, only eat at mealtimes, get out of the habit of eating while watching TV and when at home, confine eating to the kitchen or dining room.

Have regular drinks – this will help to keep you feeling full. Hot drinks are particularly useful as hot liquids empty from the stomach slower than cooler ones, and occasional sugar-free sodas can help to satisfy your taste buds.

If you get the urge to eat, look at the time and wait half an hour before having something.

Brush your teeth or use minty mouthwash after meals. The minty taste will help curb cravings. This is especially useful after your evening meal, as we often associate cleaning our teeth with the last thing we do with our mouth for the day.

Adopt an eating strategy to help with discipline and to maintain a routine. For example, some people find intermittent fasting useful as it minimizes the window for permitted eating.

Snack sensibly – fruit and berries are a great choice and will help curb sweet cravings. Sugar-free jello is also a great snack.

Don’t let a slip-up lead to more – if you do succumb to a craving, avoid the mindset “now that I’ve eaten that, I may as well make the most of it”.

360 MAGAZINE, illustration

James Bay × Instagram Guitar Lessons

JAMES BAY GIVES GUITAR LESSON FOR FAN FAVORITE “SCARS”

PERFORMS AS PART OF GLOBAL CITIZEN’S TOGETHER AT HOME SERIES

NEXT GUITAR LESSON ON INSTAGRAM LIVE TOMORROW AT 1PM EST

Three-time GRAMMY® Award-nominated and BRIT Award-winning multiplatinum singer-songwriter James Bay continues to give guitar lessons on Instagram Live Wednesdays and Fridays at 1PM EST. This week he taught fan favorite “Scars“, watch HERE.

In the past, BAY has taught fans “Let It Go“, “Hold Back The River“, “Us“, and “Wild Love.” Tune in tomorrow at 1PM EST for his next lesson.

James Bay recently performed as part of Global Citizen’s #TogetherAtHome concert series in support of the World Health Organization. Watch the performance HERE.

James Bay, Scars, Instagram Live, Republic Records, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

Machine Gun Kelly and YUNGBLUD – “Champagne Supernova”

MACHINE GUN KELLY AND YUNGBLUD RELEASE NEW COVER OF OASIS’ “CHAMPAGNE SUPERNOVA”

Machine Gun Kelly and YUNGBLUD join forces and create their own version of the 1995 Oasis single “Champagne Supernova”. Breaking up the melodies, Machine Gun Kelly and YUNGBLUD present a modern twist on a legendary British pop single. The video for the cover places MGK and YUNGBLUD singing in their bathrooms while staying at home. Watch the “Champagne Supernova” cover of the video HERE.

While gearing up for his upcoming “Tickets To My Downfall” pop/punk album release, Machine Gun Kelly has put together a playlist of songs on Spotify that have inspired him throughout the making of the album. MGK has recently released his cover of Paramore’s “Misery Business” with Travis Barker, Omar Fedi and Steve “Baze” Basil. He is also seen in Jason Orley’s comedy Big Time Adolescence which is now available on Hulu. In addition, MGK is set to star opposite Sam Worthington on the big screen in the forthcoming action western; The Last Song of Issac LeMay, which begins production this month. While spending time at home, Machine Gun Kelly has been very active on social media during his quarantine, covering some of his favorite artists. Check out his Guitar Jam Sessions HERE.

For more information, please visit www.machinegunkelly.com

Soundcloud | Youtube

Rice University on COVID-19

Rice U. experts available to discuss COVID-19’s wide-ranging impact

As the COVID-19 pandemic grows and impacts the lives of people across the globe, Rice University experts are available to discuss various topics related to the disease.

Joyce Beebefellow in public finance at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, can discuss paid leave programs.

“COVID-19 highlights the importance of paid (sick) leave programs to workers,” she said. “The issue is not whether we should have a paid leave program; it is how to design a program that provides nationwide coverage to all American workers instead of waiting until the next pandemic.”

Robert Bruce, dean of Rice’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, is an expert in online and distance learning, community education and engagement and innovative models for personal and professional development programs.

“The field of continuing and professional studies is uniquely positioned to help the public during a crisis that requires social distancing,” he said. “Our core mission is to empower people to continue to learn and advance, regardless of location or age or learning style.”

Utpal Dholakia, a professor of marketing at Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Business, is available to discuss consumer behavior and panic-buying during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Everyone is panic-buying, not just all over the country, but basically all over the world,” Dholakia said. “That makes the sense of urgency even more. Are all these suppliers going to be able to keep up with the demand?”

John Diamond, the Edward A. and Hermena Hancock Kelly Fellow in Tax Policy at the Baker Institute and an adjunct assistant professor in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss the economic impact on Houston and Texas, particularly unemployment.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, the Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences, professor in sociology and director of Rice’s Religion and Public Life Program, studies the intersection of science and religion. She can discuss how these two entities can work together to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and recently authored an editorial about this topic for Time magazine. It is available online HERE.

Christopher Fagundes, an associate professor in the department of psychological sciences, is available to discuss the link between mental and immune health.

“In my field, we have conducted a lot of work to look at what predicts who gets colds and different forms of respiratory illnesses, and who is more susceptible to getting sick,” Fagundes said. “We’ve found that stressloneliness and lack of sleep are three factors that can seriously compromise aspects of the immune system that make people more susceptible to viruses if exposed. Also, stress, loneliness and disrupted sleep promote other aspects of the immune system responsible for the production of proinflammatory cytokines to overrespond. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production can generate sustained upper respiratory infection symptoms.”

And while this research has centered on different cold and upper respiratory viruses, he said “there is no doubt” that these effects would be the same for COVID-19.

Mark Finley is a fellow in energy and global oil at the Baker Institute.

“The U.S. and global oil market is simultaneously grappling with the biggest decline in demand ever seen (due to COVID-19) and a price war between two of the world’s largest producers, Russia and Saudi Arabia,” he said.

Bill Fulton, director of Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, an urban planner, an expert on local government and the former mayor of Ventura, California, can speak to both the short-term and long-term changes in city life and the way government works.

What will the effect be on transportation and transit? Retail and office space? Will people walk and bike more? How will they interact in public spaces in the future? How will government function and hold public meetings during the crisis, and will this fundamentally alter the way government interacts with the public in the long run? How will local governments deal with the inevitable revenue loss — and, in the long run, with the fact that they will probably have less sales tax?

Vivian Ho, the James A. Baker III Institute Chair in Health Economics, director for the Center of Health and Biosciences at the Baker Institute and a professor of economics, can discuss insurance coverage as families experience lost income and jobs during the crisis.

“Policymakers should temporarily expand subsidies for middle class workers who buy insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplace,” Ho said. “Families experiencing lost income due to the pandemic shouldn’t have to worry about losing access to health care in the midst of a pandemic.”

“Hospitals in states that did not expand Medicaid coverage to able-bodied adults under the Affordable Care Act are bearing tougher financial burdens, which may damage their ability to respond to the current health crisis,” she said.

Mark Jones, a professor of political science and fellow at the Baker Institute, is available to discuss how the spread of COVID-19 is impacting elections, including runoffs in Texas.

“COVID-19 has already resulted in the postponement of local elections originally scheduled for May 2, with the elections now to be held in November with current officeholders’ tenure extended until their successors are confirmed in November,” Jones said. “It is increasingly likely that COVID-19 will affect the Democratic and Republican primary runoff elections scheduled for May 26, with a growing possibility that the elections will be conducted entirely via mail ballots or at the minimum will involve the adoption of no-excuse absentee voting whereby any Texan, not just those 65 or older, hospitalized or out of the county, will be able to obtain an absentee ballot and vote by mail.

“The emergency adoption of no-excuse absentee voting would change the composition of the May primary runoff electorate by expanding turnout among many voters who otherwise would have been unlikely to participate, as well as increase pressure on the Texas Legislature to reform the state’s electoral legislation to allow for no-excuse absentee voting when it reconvenes in January of 2021 for the next regular session.”

Danielle King, an assistant professor of psychological sciences and principal investigator of Rice’s WorKing Resilience Lab, is an expert on the topic of resilience to adversity. Her research focuses on understanding the role individuals, groups and organizations play in fostering adaptive sustainability following adversity. She can discuss how individuals can remain resilient and motivated in difficult circumstances.

“Though we are still in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic, we can begin to enact adaptive practices that foster resilience such as remaining flexible to changing circumstances, practicing acceptance of the present realities, seeking social support in creative ways while practicing social distancing, and finding and engaging with experiences and thoughts that elicit positive emotions during trying times,” King said.

Tom Kolditz, founding director of Rice’s Doerr Institute for New Leaders, is a social psychologist and former brigadier general who has done extensive research on how best to lead people under perceived serious threat. His work is widely taught at military service and police academies globally, and he did extensive work with the banking industry during the 2008 financial crisis. His expertise is in articulating what people need from leaders in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous times and what leaders must do to gain and maintain people’s trust. His book, “In Extremis Leadership: Leading As If Your Life Depended On It,” teaches people to lead in crisis, when people are anxious or afraid.

“Leadership when people are under threat hinges far less on managerial principles, and far more on trust,” Kolditz said. “Whether in a company or their own family, people who lead in the same way now as they did two months ago will experience a significant decline in their influence.”

Jim Krane, the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for Energy Studies at the Baker Institute, is an expert on energy geopolitics and Middle East economies and societies. He can comment on the effect on OPEC and its production decisions, relations between Russia and Saudi Arabia, and how low oil prices will affect policy inside producer countries.

Ken Medlock, the James A. Baker III and Susan G. Baker Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics at the Baker Institute, senior director of institute’s Center for Energy Studies and an adjunct professor and lecturer in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss COVID-19’s impact on oil prices and the oil industry.

Kirsten Ostherr, the Gladys Louise Fox Professor of English and director of Rice’s Medical Futures Lab, can discuss the representation of outbreaks, contagion and disease in public discourse and the media. She is also an expert on digital health privacy. She is the founding director of the Medical Humanities program at Rice, and her first book, “Cinematic Prophylaxis: Globalization and Contagion in the Discourse of World Health,” is one of several titles made available for open-access download through June 1 by its publisher, Duke University Press.

Peter Rodriguez, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business and a professor of strategic management, can discuss the economic impact of COVID-19 in Houston, the state of Texas and around the world.

Eduardo Salas, professor and chair of the Department of Psychological Sciences, is available to discuss collaboration, teamwork, team training and team dynamics as it relates to COVID-19.

“We often hear that ‘we are in this together’ and, indeed, we are,” Salas said. “Effective collaboration and teamwork can save lives. And there is a science of teamwork that can provide guidance on how to manage and promote effective collaboration.”

Kyle Shelton, deputy director of the Kinder Institute, can discuss how the economic impact of COVID-19 closures and job losses can amplify housing issues, and why governments at every level are opting for actions such as halting evictions and foreclosures and removing late fees. He can also speak to some of the challenges confronted by public transportation, why active transportation like biking and walking are so important now, and how long-term investments in these systems make cities and regions more adaptive and resilient.

Bob Stein, the Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and a fellow in urban politics at the Baker Institute, is an expert in emergency preparedness, especially related to hurricanes and flooding. He can also discuss why and when people comply with government directives regarding how to prepare for and respond to natural disasters, and the political consequences of natural disasters.

“Since God is not on the ballot, who do voters hold accountable before and in the aftermath of natural disasters?” he said.

Laurence Stuart, an adjunct professor in management at Rice Business, can discuss unemployment in Texas, how people qualify for it and what that means for employers and employees.

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,962 undergraduates and 3,027 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 4 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.