Posts tagged with "newspaper"

Meghan McCain Speaks Against Antisemitism

Top Individuals Positively Influencing Jewish Life include Attorney General of New York Letita James, Comedian Bill Maher, Selma Blair, Noa Tishby

“I cannot stay silent when I see or hear antisemitism,” said actress Debra Messing on receiving the Algemeiner newspaper’s ‘Warrior For Truth’ award. “During Will and Grace it was important to me that Grace’s Jewishness be central to her identity because representation matters. I know that speaking up is a value shared by all of us here.” TV personality Meghan McCain followed Messing in the award ceremony, passionately declaring, “Antisemitism is abhorrent and innately un-American. We are Americans. What do Americans do when we meet up with the fanatical movement bent upon the eradication of Jews? We fight them. We’re going to fight these people too,” said McCain, “there is no place in America for antisemitism.”

The Ambassador of Israel to the U.S. and U.N. Gilad Erdan, philanthropist Nina Rennert Davidson, and Algemeiner Editor in Chief and CEO Dovid Efune, with his wife Mushka Efune were also honored at the Algemeiner newspaper’s 8th annual J100 Gala at the Rockleigh Country Club on October 12, 2021.

Joseph Borgen, the victim of a vicious antisemitic attack earlier this year in Manhattan and who McCain invited onto ABC’s The View, was a guest speaker.   It was an emotional moment at the J100 gala when McCain and Borgen met in person for the first time. “The only publication that continues to act as a voice for me and bring attention to my situation is The Algemeiner,” said Borgen, “They bring light to the issue and hold people accountable for what took place. They make sure that antisemitism is not washed away or forgotten.”

Ambassador Erdan, introduced by Malcolm Hoenlein, reinforced this position, saying, “The biggest threat facing Israel and the Jewish people today is the deadly combination of lies and disinformation. Disinformation may begin as words but violence is only one small step away.” 

Dovid Efune and Chairman Simon Jacobson shared the importance of the evening, “After the events of the past year,” said Efune, “when we witnessed again 1,000 strands of falsehood weaved together into a thick rope of hate, that a line has been firmly drawn under our long-held conviction that lies can kill and that the truth saves lives. It is often the case that stories first reported by The Algemeiner would simply not see the light of day, that the historical record would remain uncorrected, without the diligent skills of our team. The voice of the Algemeiner is indispensable.”

Nina Rennert Davidson implored the live crowd to join her and the other honorees in their fight, “Please speak up at board meetings and parties. Please do not allow your schools to have speakers, teachers and curriculums that attack Israel. If we do not respect our heritage, how can we ask anybody else to?”

TV journalist Dana Arschin served as Master of Ceremonies. The Event Chairs were Neil and Sharon Book, with Bernard-Henri Levy as Honorary Chairman. 

The J100 Gala celebrated the release of the Algemeiner’s highly anticipated J100 List. The Algemeiner newspaper releases an annual list of 100 significant individuals who positively influence Jewish life, called the J100 List. On the importance and relevance of the J100, Efune said, “This year we’ve placed particular emphasis on those standing at the forefront of the battle for truth.” 

The 2021 list includes Attorney General of New York Letita James, comedian Bill Maher, actresses Noa Tishby and Selma Blair, actor Jonathan Lipnicki, celebrity chef Jake Cohen, Morton Williams Supermarket owner Avi Kaner, publising mogul Mathias Doepfner, Papaya Global CEO Eynat Guez, and MLB athlete Jacob Steinmetz. 

Watch all speeches HERE.

Billed as the Jewish answer to the TIME 100, the full list, and a description of why they were chosen, can be found at HERE

ABOUT THE ALGEMEINER

Now celebrating its 49th anniversary, The Algemeiner newspaper has been labeled the “fastest growing Jewish newspaper in the US” by CNBC. It has been described by former Israeli Ambassador Ron Prosor as “the voice of the Jewish people and Israel” and hailed as “brave and relentlessly accurate” by longtime New Republic editor Marty Peretz.

graph via Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Black Owned Media’s Marketing Panel

By: Skyler Johnson

Black Owned Media Equity and Sustainability Institute hosted an educational marketing panel to help small businesses, primarily newsrooms, in getting people to donate money through membership.

Building Trust

There are many ways to build trust with the audience. The easiest way is to create habits through emails and newsletters. The phone is the modern day porch. People routinely wake up and check their phones in the same way they used to read the newspaper. They offer a way for companies to meet their clientele where they are. It’s important to be transparent about what the association is and what its goal is. A person may not know a certain magazine is non-profit.

They drew a comparison with dating apps. Potential members are the people swiping left and right. The goal would be to get people from casual hookups, people looking at random articles, to active viewers. The newsletter was mentioned as a consistent and direct channel to readers. Once you build up their trust, you can begin to ask for donations.

Welcome Series

A welcome series is helpful in this transparency. It lets them know why they need your newspaper in their lives. After the welcome series, now they can ask for money, which can and should feel uncomfortable and daunting. One should never be too cautious when asking for money. They recommended having monthly donations instead of one-time payments. 

Surveys

When attempting to decide which content resonates the most with your base, survey  was described as the easiest way to do so. These questionnaires should find out the basic needs of your patrons: where and how and how often they will read. What kind of news do they read? Publishing polls yearly help in seeing changes over time. And it’s important to include some questions gauging the emotional connection the patron has with the content. 

Conclusion

Ultimately, the panelists explained, there’s no exact science for any of this. It’s hard to gauge whether something will work or not and it’s impossible to tell how many welcome emails are needed and how much you should ask for in donations. That takes practice, and with enough of it you’ll be able to secure donations easily.

Kaelen Felix illustration for 360 MAGAZINE pizza article

NO. 1 TAKEOUT DISH – PIZZA

According to New York Post, pizza is one of the most popular takeaway dishes searched in the world.

National Pizza Week: growth pizza restaurants comes to abrupt halt

BoldData crunches the numbers 

Next week is National Pizza Week. An entire week in honor of one of America’s all-time favorite foods. Time to crunch the numbers! The latest statistics from data specialist BoldData show that the amount of pizza restaurants in America has increased with a whopping 39.2% over the last five years. However, the growth abruptly stopped in 2020. 

Pizza party over?

Craving pizza? There are currently 90.817 pizza restaurants in The United States. An increase of 39.2% compared to 2016, in this year there were 65.213 pizza places. Especially 2017 was a good year for pizza: with an increase of 11.137 pizza joints (17.1 %). In the beginning of 2021 the USA should’ve reached the magical number of 100.000 pizza restaurants, but then COVID-19 happened… The growth of pizza restaurants came to an abrupt halt in 2020, with an increase of only 581 restaurants.  

California is the pizza place to be

When it comes to pizza, California is the place to be. The state has 8.271 pizza places, of which 2.044 are based in the Los Angeles area. New York comes in second with 7.190 restaurants, a growth of 48% compared to 2016. The biggest growth took place in Hawaii: a whopping 69%. Pizza lovers best stay away from Wyoming, the state has the lowest number of pizza joints (133). 


USA takes biggest slice worldwide

Americans love their pizza. It’s even considered America’s favorite food. Therefore it’s no surprise that the USA is home to the largest number of pizza restaurants worldwide. Italy –  where the modern pizza was originally invented – comes in second with 42.288 pizzeria’s. Brazil completes the top 3 with 32.283 pizza joints. But the USA has nothing to fear from the rest of the world. With 90.817 pizza restaurant the USA still has more pizzeria’s then the top 4 combined (88.100). Australia is number 8 on the list: with 5.598 pizza restaurants they have one of the highest number of pizza places per capita.   

About BoldData:

We are global data experts with a highly accurate database of 287+ million companies worldwide. With our data have helped 2.000+ companies with analytics, research and CRM. Our data is being used by renowned research companies such as Statista. As well by FMCG companies such as Heineken, P&G, Danone and UberEats. 

Vaughn Lowery makes pizza for 360 MAGAZINE article
360 Magazine, Ahmaud Arbery, Politics

So You Want a Career in Journalism?

Journalism is an exciting, fast-paced, and interesting career where no two days are the same. Journalists can work for newspapers, TV stations, websites, magazines and radio stations. Most of the time, the best way to get into a career as a journalist is to earn a relevant degree, although you might be able to get into the field through an apprenticeship. If you’ve decided that a career in journalism is a good fit for you, here’s the experience and qualifications you’ll need to beat the competition. 

Qualifications:

There are two common routes into journalism, which include earning an undergraduate journalism degree, or taking an undergraduate degree in a different subject, followed by a master’s degree in journalism. You can search journalism courses at University Compare; a website where you can look at all the different degree options available, where to study them, and the differences between them. When you choose where to do your degree from this list, make sure that you opt for a course that is NCTJ (National Council for the Training of Journalists) accredited if you want to eventually work for a news organisation based in the UK. You can also choose a degree with an area of specialisation, such as newspaper journalism, multimedia journalism, or broadcast journalism. 

Blogging:

While studying for your degree in journalism, using your spare time to start a blog can be a great way to get relevant experience in your career and make valuable connections that will help you when looking for work in the future. A strong blog and a large Twitter following will help you get noticed by potential employers who are looking for new hires that have a solid understanding of online journalism. And, many postgraduate degree courses will expect applicants to have blogging experience and an active Twitter account with a large following, so this will be extremely helpful if you want to go on to get a master’s in journalism in the future. 

Choosing the Right University:

Most universities in the UK will offer a course in journalism, but not all of them are created equal. Along with making sure that you are only applying to NCTJ accredited courses, you might want to consider other accreditations, such as the BJTC (Broadcast Journalism Training Council) if you are considering a career in radio journalism. You should also look at the facilities, reputation, teaching staff, course content, and where journalism graduates from a particular university go on to study further or work. Bear in mind that journalism graduates who have a wide range of skills tend to have more options in the job market, so it’s worth considering a course that teaches extra skills such as data journalism, financial reporting, or video production. 

Getting Work Experience:

While there will be plenty of opportunities for you to get valuable work experience as you study, the experience that matters the most is that you get after graduating. Typically, your first job will be working as a junior reporter, covering any stories that are allocated to you. Generally, these jobs are long-term contracts rather than short-term, which is great if you’re looking for a position with plenty of security, which isn’t always the case when working in the media. However, starting salaries are low, so you might want to consider freelancing for more than one news organisation, something that will become more accessible to you as you build up your experience and contacts. 

Working as a journalist is a very exciting career choice. Finding the right university and course to study, however, is just the beginning; start focusing on building your network and experience as early as possible. 

illustration, 360 MAGAZINE, Alejandra Villagra

The Decline of Black Media

Spokesperson for the Save Journalism Project, Nick Charles, has a new op-ed in the NY Daily News discussing the impact of Google and Facebook’s decimation of the news industry’s business model and specifically the decline of black media. What were traditionally spaces for communities of color to spread news and ideas are being forced to shutter their newsrooms because of big tech’s stranglehold on the industry, resulting in a lack of representation and a rapid decline of coverage for these communities.

As Charles explains, “revenue from digital advertising, which used to go to news publishers, is more often than not in big tech’s pockets, leading to an unchecked balance of power and gaping holes in local news coverage nationwide… Informing African-American communities should be put before Facebook and Google’s profits. People of color have worked and died so American democracy includes everyone. But there is no democracy, no freedom, without the fourth estate.”

Charles’ op-ed is below and available online.

Some remember well the world where events, issues, policies and histories impacting black people were rarely acknowledged or reported by the mainstream press. In New York City, if it happened above 96th St., it wasn’t news. That began to change after the urban riots of the late 1960s and the Kerner Commission, which prompted mainstream media to begin hiring African-American reporters. African-American media, which had always filled the breach, did hemorrhage talent, but continued invaluable community coverage.

With the emergence of the internet, as legacy media, newspapers, magazines, radio and television news were joined by newer platforms and social media, there was always space to cover disasters like Hurricane Katrina as well as enduring environmental, racial and social injustices. But now that space is shrinking rapidly. McClatchy filing for bankruptcy is just the latest and most ominous example.

An unfettered and thriving press is paramount, especially to otherwise forgotten communities. But what happens when outlets are forced to shutter because big tech chokes off advertising oxygen that is essential to the media’s survival?

Newspapers that adapted and survived the last digital revolution did so through advertising. But today’s digital ad market is dominated by Google and Facebook. Revenue from digital advertising, which used to go to news publishers, is more often than not in big tech’s pockets, leading to an unchecked balance of power and gaping holes in local news coverage nationwide.

Google recently announced it was doing away with third-party cookies by 2022, further jeopardizing the fate of the voices and publishers of communities of color. The move will hit smaller news outlets hard by substantially reducing the value of advertising on their websites. Most don’t have the kind of first-party information nor the kind of scale that will now be required to be valuable to digital advertisers.

Newsrooms across the country are experiencing layoffs at an alarming rate. In 2019, the media shed over 7,800 jobs. The number of black journalists and reporters in newsrooms has also been impacted, with the number of black journalists working at daily newspapers dropping by 40% since 1997. Countless colleagues have left the profession, taking with them their passion, expertise and the trust they amassed over years with community leaders, politicians and activists.

Unable to keep up with a business model steamrolled by the likes of Facebook and Google, the industry is reaching the point of no return. Big tech’s dominance over the digital ad market and unrivaled capacity to scale and monetize its platforms is having drastic effects on journalism as a whole — with especially profound impact on communities of color.

Black legacy outlets, home to some of the most committed journalists and activists in our country’s history, have been the bulwark of accountability for many when racial tensions kept even the government from its role in protecting its citizens. The Chicago Defender itself was one of the sparks in The Great Migration.

Alongside downsizing and retracting their print editions, examples like the Amsterdam News showed a 21% drop in circulation from 2014-2015; The Chicago Defender’s circulation fell by 18% in 2015. Not only are black communities losing their news outlets, black perspectives across the news industry are losing the spaces to voice their opinions.

Founded in 1943 and for decades a space for black communities to share the most pressing news and ideas of the time, Alabama’s longest-running black newspaper, the Mobile Beacon, reported it was planning to close its doors after 2019. It is one of many black legacy media icons in jeopardy.

Frederick Douglass once said: “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” Informing African-American communities should be put before Facebook and Google’s profits. People of color have worked and died so American democracy includes everyone. But there is no democracy, no freedom, without the fourth estate.

Charles, a freelance writer, works with Save Journalism Project.

Journalism in America is facing an existential threat from the monopolistic control of tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Apple. Big tech’s dominance over the digital advertising market and their unrivaled capacity to monetize its platforms are having drastic effects on journalism as a whole.

http://savejournalism.org/

Save Journalism Project Launches To Protect Our Press From Big Tech

BuzzFeed Reports on Recently Laid Off Journalists Serving  As Spox For New Campaign To Save Journalism From Monopolistic Power of Big Tech Companies

Today, BuzzFeed reports on the Save Journalism Project that’s launching to raise awareness and engagement about the critical need to save journalism as it faces an existential threat—the monopolistic power of big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple destroying the economic model of the entire journalism industry, whether its traditional circulation newspapers or digital news outlets. At the same time, Google and Facebook have made acquisition after acquisition, gaining a monopolistic position that lets them dominate the digital advertising marketplace and distribute massive amounts of content from news publishers on their platforms without paying to produce the content. Just now are Facebook, Google, and other tech giants facing federal government and Congressional antitrust scrutiny.

Two recently laid off reporters will serve as spokespeople for the Save Journalism Project, Laura Bassett  and John StantonLearn More and Join the Fight at SaveJournalism.org and@SaveTheNews.

BuzzFeed: These Reporters Lost Their Jobs. Now They’re Fighting Back Against Big Tech.

“John Stanton and Laura Bassett are warning about what they believe the tech industry is doing to journalism, as thousands have lost their jobs this year alone.

By Rosie Gray”

Two prominent reporters who were recently laid off from digital media outlets are forming a new advocacy group formed to raise awareness about big tech’s impact on the journalism industry.

John Stanton, a longtime congressional correspondent and former BuzzFeed News Washington bureau chief, and Laura Bassett, a former culture and political reporter for nearly 10 years at the Huffington Post, have teamed up to launch a new initiative called the Save Journalism Project. The two have first-hand experience with the troubled state of the news industry: Stanton was laid off from BuzzFeed News during a round of layoffs that affected 200 people company-wide this winter and spurred a unionization drive among the news staff. Bassett lost her job in similar fashion in January after Huffington Post laid off 20 employees as part of larger cuts at its parent company, Verizon Media.

This year has been one of the worst in recent memory for journalism jobs. Across the industry, thousands have lost their jobs: from BuzzFeed News, Vice, CNN, and others across the country at local publications. Media organizations have been imperiled by crashing advertising revenues as Facebook and Google vacuum up available ad dollars.

Their new project will be set up as a nonprofit, according to Eddie Vale, a Democratic consultant whose firm is providing the man-power to launch the effort. Vale pitched Bassett on the idea, and the two of them brought in Stanton. Vale said initial funding had been secured from “someone who doesn’t want to be public so Google and Facebook don’t go after them,” and the group plans to continue to fundraise. So far, the pair have co-authored testimony given to the Senate Judiciary Committee highlighting the tech giants’ impact on the news industry — “since being laid off, we’ve made it our mission to understand how the digital marketplace works and how Big Tech is killing the journalism industry,” they wrote — flown a plane above Google’s I/O conference, and authored op-eds.

A key part of their goal is to get journalists, who aren’t known for showing a keen interest in the business side of their publications or for engaging in advocacy themselves, to take an active role in defending the future of their jobs. In an interview, Stanton said they were “trying to educate the public and members of Congress and also start encouraging our colleagues to speak up.”

“Reporters are not generally super interested in speaking about their own problems and about things that affect them directly because they feel like it becomes a conflict of interest, and in certain ways that’s true,” Stanton said. “But when the future of the free press is being pretty seriously endangered by something, I think it’s incumbent upon us to stand up for ourselves.”

Like many reporters, Bassett said she had “never really had to pay attention to the financial side of journalism.”

But “after getting laid off, I started to become really interested in why all of these amazing news publishers were sort of going under, having to lay off staff, why we were losing local newspapers. It’s a tragedy, it’s really bad for democracy.”

Their effort comes at a time of increased scrutiny of the tech industry on the part of the federal government as well as Congress as public concern mounts over repeated privacy scandals, technology companies’ role in spreading misinformation, and their dominance over certain industries. The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission reportedly made a deal to divide potential antitrust investigations between them; Apple and Google will fall under the purview of the DOJ, while the FTC took Facebook and Amazon. The House Judiciary Committee announced it would “conduct a top-to-bottom review of the market power held by giant tech platforms.”

The Save Journalism Project’s founders are hoping to steer the public conversation around the negative effects of Big Tech towards its impact on journalism.

Stanton, who lives in New Orleans, mentioned examples like that city’s local paper, the Times-Picayune, which laid off its entire staff last month. Around the country, Stanton said, “local reporters are so overtaxed. They’re doing as good a job as they can but there’s not enough of them.”

At the moment, Stanton and Bassett are more focused on warning the public and the industry about the issue than on proposing solutions.

“I do think that everyone is starting to see a need to break up and regulate these companies or something along those lines,” Bassett said. “And with regards to how they’re going to make journalism viable again, I don’t frankly know…I think right now we’re starting with just getting this conversation out into the public and making people aware of exactly what’s going on. I do hope at some point we graduate into saying, ‘here’s a list of policy proposals, here’s exactly what needs to happen.'”

Stanton and Bassett plan to interview elected officials, candidates and colleagues in the media about the industry’s crisis, and started with conducting on-camera interviews with Reps. Mark DeSaulnier and Ruben Gallego. They plan to circulate a letter with which media companies can sign on to their cause. And their first official event will be at the annual Congressional Baseball Game, where they plan to distribute a physical newspaper laying out the problems on their agenda.

“The DC press corps is a really powerful constituency within our industry,” Stanton said. “If we can get our colleagues [there] to start talking about this it will help more broadly.”