Posts tagged with "experts"

Medical illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Top 5 YouTube Doctors

Since YouTube was founded in 2005, it has become something we take for granted as a source of information. If you want a taste of other ways of life, search YouTube. If you need to know how to do something, watch a YouTube video. If you need advice, find an expert on YouTube.

When it comes to the medical profession, however, YouTube experts need to walk a delicate line. Giving general advice regarding medical treatments can put undiscerning viewers at risk. At the very least, it can cause the doctor tremendous legal and career issues.

The best YouTube doctors have found that balance and give information and tips without crossing over into medical guidance. Here are the 5 doctors who do it best.

1. Doctor Mike

Dr. Mikhail Varshavski is a Russian-born American medical expert. He became popular online when he was named People Magazine’s Sexiest Doctor Alive. However, he is far more than a pretty face (with an adorable dog). Doctor Mike has millions of followers, to whom he provides health tips (but not medical advice). He explains different medical conditions and terms as well, along with lifestyle changes for improved health.

During the early days of the COVID-19 crisis, he used his channel to debunk false information, providing a clear vision of the real risks of the virus.

2. Dr. Joseph J. Allen

In the realm of eye care, there is no one better than Joseph J Allen OD. Dr Allen dispenses information via his YouTube channel, Doctor Eye Health. He is also the CEO of Vision Excellence Eye Consulting LLC.

In his videos, Dr. Allen shares interesting facts about the eye, important eye health tips, and insight into both common and rare eye conditions. He also recommends some of the best eye care products available. With over 250,000 subscribers to his channel, he is extremely influential and uses his platform carefully and responsibly.

Go to GlassesUSA.com to read some of the latest health articles, with whom Dr. Allen collaborates.

3. Dr. Dray

There is one type of health care that is a basic responsibility of each and every person. Skincare. Not everyone takes skincare as seriously, but proper care is not only important for aesthetic reasons but for general health as well. Skin issues may be a sign of illness, and overexposure to sun can contribute to skin cancer.

Dr. Dray is a dermatologist who uses her channel to dispense tips and review various skincare products. Considering that the variety of skincare products is huge, it is great to get a professional opinion on which actually work.

4. Dr. Robert Morsand

Dr. Morsand differentiates himself from the other doctors on this list because he doesn’t just provide general tips. He posts extensive Q&A sessions in which he answers people’s questions about a myriad health issues in depth.

There is a lot to learn from Dr. Morsand’s decades of experience, and you’ll find more specific information on his channel than on most others.

5. The Junior Doctor

Dr Ezgi Ozcan is a junior doctor in the UK who records vlogs about her life. Rather than providing medical advice, she shows what the daily life of a junior doctor is like. If you’re unfamiliar with the term, junior doctors are essentially the British equivalent of American residents.

Having recently given birth, she is portraying what it is like to be a mother in this line of work as well. Her channel is entertaining, informative, and she is incredibly personable.

What Keeps Men From Picking Up Their Household Mess

By Andi Simon, Ph.D.

For many of the women I have been working with during the pandemic crisis, the biggest complaint has been: “Why doesn’t my husband help pick up the mess?” “Don’t men even see the toys all around them, the dishes in the sink, the clothes needing folding?” And when they finally lend a hand, it is hardly neat or “the way I would have done it.”

Well, ladies and gentlemen, the cultural dilemma is upon us, exaggerated during the current stay-at-home, work remotely era caused by COVID-19. What wives, moms and girlfriends might have silently dealt with in the past has become a major issue when both partners are now at home together. Differences are more apparent, irritations closer to the surface.

As an anthropologist, and a wife, and a mother, I know all too well how difficult it is to change habits in adults. Once we learn our habits, they take over and drive us. My husband is a wonderful teammate but loves to leave his cabinets open, his clothes folded but not so smoothly, and his office … well let’s not discuss that. I do confess, at times my office is as big a mess as his, which is OK as long as each of us stick to our own disorderly worlds.

In a recent Atlantic article, “The Myth That Gets Men Out of Doing Chores,” Joe Pinsker writes about how these male-female differences originate partly from how boys and girls are raised, and partly from how men and women simply see things through different lenses. While some contend that boys are naturally messier than girls, there is little research to support that. If anything, boys and girls (and men and women) can both make a mess in the bedroom, the bathroom and the kitchen — indeed, making messes comes naturally to both sexes. Cleaning them up, less so.

The issue is that boys and girls are taught differently what it means to be “neat” or “messy.” There is nothing inherent in either of those words. We learn what they mean as we grow up, and the ones teaching us play a major role in handing down those cultural values about what we should or should not be doing to create order in our lives.

What matters is how we “believe” that we as humans create and manage our physical and social order, at home and outside of it. Watch boys at a sporting event — lacrosse, soccer or anything — and they learn quickly how to pack their sports bag and keep their equipment in good shape (or be yelled at by the coach). Girls do the same. In the office, men can be very neat, or not. I have had bosses with horrible office order and others who were so immaculate that it was weird. The same has been true of male or female bosses.

The question then becomes: Why do we think women should pick up the toys, fold the laundry and close the cabinets, while the guys watch their ballgame and drink their beer with a mess all around them? Humans are culture-creating and culture-living creatures. As children, we learn from parents, teachers and friends what is valued and for whom. If boys are allowed to have messy rooms because, well, they are just boys, they will quickly learn that boys can be messy, ignore the mess, and not be expected to restore order to it. If girls are told that they must clean up their rooms before they can do something they want, they learn other rules and other norms.

It really is true that what we see our mothers and fathers, and others, doing is what we mimic, in business and in life. It becomes embedded in our psyches, sometimes without our even realizing. If girls and women repeatedly hear that cleanliness is next to godliness, they will learn that making the bed, tidying the kitchen and cleaning up messes are positive reinforcements for how good and acceptable they are. Boys don’t learn this. In fact, if a boy neatly picks up his toys and then is called a sissy, what value judgement is that passing along?

So then, if you have a man in the house who repeatedly ignores the kids’ mess on the floor, think hard about what both of you are teaching your kids about personal responsibility, beyond neatness and messiness. You might during this at-home period be able to change their futures by providing them with unbiased values and beliefs about what men and women see and do. Remember, it is easier to change the kids than the guy. I would advise, though, that in your corrections to the latter, tread carefully but quickly, before the opportunity evaporates.

About Andi Simon

Andi Simon, Ph.D., author of the book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business, is a corporate anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants. A trained practitioner in Blue Ocean Strategy®, Simon has conducted several hundred workshops and speeches on the topic as well as consulted with a wide range of clients across the globe. She also is the author of the award-winning book On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. Simon has a successful podcast, On the Brink with Andi Simon, that has more than 125,000 monthly listeners, and is ranked among the top 20 Futurist podcasts and top 200 business podcasts. In addition, Global Advisory Experts named Simons’ firm the Corporate Anthropology Consultancy Firm of the Year in New York – 2020. She has been on Good Morning, America and Bloomberg, and is widely published in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Business Week, Becker’s, and American Banker, among others. She has been a guest blogger for Forbes.com, Huffington Post, and Fierce Health.

Criteria to Ensure Preparedness of Federal Programs

The Strategic Stockpile Failed; Experts Propose New Approach to Emergency Preparedness

A new analysis of the United States government’s response to COVID-19 highlights myriad problems with an approach that relied, in large part, on international supply chains and the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS). A panel of academic and military experts is instead calling for a more dynamic, flexible approach to emergency preparedness at the national level.

“When COVID-19 hit, the U.S. was unable to provide adequate testing supplies and equipment, unable to provide adequate personal protective equipment (PPE), and didn’t have a functioning plan,” says Rob Handfield, first author of the study and Bank of America University Distinguished Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management at North Carolina State University.

“The SNS hadn’t replenished some of its supplies since the H1N1 pandemic in 2009-10. Many of its supplies were expired. And there was no clear leadership. Federal authorities punted problems to the states, leaving states to fight each other for limited resources. And the result was chaos.

“We need to be talking about this now, because the nation needs to be better prepared next time. And there is always a next time.”

To that end, Handfield and collaborators from NC State, Arizona State University, the Naval Postgraduate School and the Air Force’s Contracting Career Field Management Team came together to outline the components that are necessary to ensure that there is an adequate federal response to future health crises. They determined that an effective federal program needs to address five criteria:

1). More Flexibility: In order to respond to unanticipated threats, any government system needs to have sufficient market intelligence to insure that it has lots of options, relationships and suppliers across the private sector for securing basic needs. 

“You can’t stockpile supplies for every possible contingency,” Handfield says.

2). Inventory Visibility: The government would need to know what supplies it has, where those supplies are, and when those supplies expire. Ideally, it would also know which supplies are available in what amounts in the private sector, as well as how quickly it could purchase those supplies.

“The same is true on the demand side,” Handfield says. “What do people need? Where? When?”

3). Responsiveness: The governmental institution overseeing emergency preparation needs to have leadership that can review information as it becomes available and work with experts to secure and distribute supplies efficiently. This would be an ongoing process, rather than a system that is put in place only in the event of crises.

4). Global Independence: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the fact that the U.S. has outsourced manufacturing of critical biomedical materiel, because it was cheaper. Authorities need to consider investing in domestic manufacturing of PPE, testing supplies and equipment, pharmaceutical chemicals, syringes, and other biomedical supplies.

“The past year has really driven home the consequences of being dependent on other nations to meet basic needs during a pandemic,” Handfield says. “Relying largely on the least expensive suppliers for a given product has consequences.”

5). Equitable: The government needs to ensure that supplies get to where they are most needed in order to reduce the infighting and hoarding that we’ve seen in the COVID-19 pandemic.

“A first step here is to settle on a way of determining how to prioritize needs and how we would define an equitable allocation and distribution of supplies,” Handfield says.

The last ingredient is bureaucratic: Coordinating all five of these components should be done by a permanent team that is focused solely on national preparation and ensuring that the relevant federal agencies are all on the same page.

“This is a fundamental shift away from the static approach of the SNS,” Handfield says. “We need to begin exploring each of these components in more detail – and defining what a governing structure would look like. We don’t know how long we’ll have until we face another crisis.”

The paper, “A Commons for a Supply Chain in the Post-COVID-19 Era: The Case for a Reformed Strategic National Stockpile,” is published open access in The Milbank Quarterly. The paper was co-authored by Blanton Godfrey, the Joseph D. Moore Distinguished Professor in NC State’s Wilson College of Textiles; Major Daniel Finkenstadt of the Naval Postgraduate School; Eugene Schneller of Arizona State; and Peter Guinto of the Air Force’s Contracting Career Field Management Team.

Don’t Let Your Body Be A Bummer This Summer: 5 Tips To Detoxify

As summer winds down, some people who ditched their New Year’s weight-loss resolutions may re-dedicate themselves to looking good.

Even more important, though, is what we put in our bodies. What we eat and drink not only impacts how we look, but how we feel.

And to properly set the tone for the inner body and good overall health, it’s vital to get the bad stuff – toxins – out, and keep them out, says Dr. Suhyun An (www.drsuhyunan.com), an expert on regenerative medicine and co-author of Demystifying Stem Cells: A Real-Life Approach To Regenerative Medicine.

“People may want to look good, but being truly healthy on the inside is a year-round commitment,” Dr. An says. “And you need to start by detoxifying the body.

“Toxins can severely affect every part of the body. They’re in tons of every-day products.  Being aware of them and avoiding them are essential to good health.”

Dr. An provides five tips for cleaning out the toxins in your body:

Reduce the toxins you’re taking in. The first step to cleaning out toxins in your body is to cut back – or completely eliminate – things you put into your body that contain them. “When something is hard for the body to digest, it can slow down your metabolism and cause toxins to accumulate in your body,” Dr. An says. “Avoid these groups: red meat, gluten, refined sugar, processed food, alcohol, and caffeine.”

Be careful with household products. Household cleaners, soaps, and beauty products all can contain harmful toxins that are absorbed through the skin. “Choose these products carefully,” Dr. An says, “and always make sure you know what’s in them. There are many great natural cleaners and products that can help reduce the toxins your skin and body are exposed to.”

Drink plenty of water. “Water has a multitude of benefits for your body, skin, and organs,” she says. “Drinking enough water is extremely important in getting rid of toxins in the body. It helps boost metabolism and can literally flush out the harmful materials that have built up in your body.”

Add plenty of dietary fiber and antioxidants to your diet. Eating foods with plenty of fiber, such as organic fruits, vegetables and whole grains, will help your body move the toxins out. “Antioxidants help to fight free radicals and help to further remove harmful materials,” Dr. An says.

Sweat it out. Sweating is a very effective way for the body to get rid of toxins. “Achieving this through exercise also keeps your organs and systems working properly, which plays a key role in releasing toxins,” Dr. An says. “Aside from exercising, hopping into a sauna or hot bath can help, too.”

“Removing toxins is key to living a healthy life,” Dr. An says. “Just like many of us do in our homes by procrastinating and getting sloppy, our body stores junk. Get rid of it once and for all.”

About Dr. Suhyun An, DC, MSN, NP-C

Dr. Suhyun An (www.drsuhyunan.com) is the clinic director at Campbell Medical Group in Houston and an expert on regenerative medicine. She is co-author of Demystifying Stem Cells: A Real-Life Approach To Regenerative Medicine and travels the nation speaking on those topics. Dr. An received a BS in Biochemistry and Biophysical Science from the University of Houston, graduated cum laude from Parker College of Chiropractic, and got her master’s in nursing science from Samford University.

The challenges of building your own swimming pool

There are a few reasons why swimming pools have become so incredibly popular among homeowners. The first is, very obviously, the enjoyment factor. There’s nothing quite like having your own pool in the warmest months. The other is that having your own pool is great for relaxation and exercise, and a fantastic way of taking greater control over your fitness and health. However, there are some challenges involved with building your own swimming pool, and you should never start building your pool without assessing these factors first. Plan the right way and your pool could be the addition to your property that you always dreamed of.

Talk to experts
Property experts should always be your first port of call. Talk to local realtors about property prices in your area. They will know how much value a pool will add to your property. It could be that there is a little call for it in your area, but the majority of homes will be able to ask a slightly higher price with the addition of a pool.

  • For most people, a pool addition won’t add a significant amount to the overall property value, although it may well increase your property taxes.
  • You should be aiming at spending no more than 15% of your property’s total value, or you run the risk of overspending.

Setting up in advance
You will need to prepare if you decide to go ahead with your pool. Unless you have an army of helpers with shovels, it’s a good idea to make use of a mechanical digger. Pools can take a long time to dig by hand, and you’ll reduce your overall time with some industrial help. The other factor you’ll need to consider is what to do with the excess soil. You’re going to need to rid yourself of that soil, and this could be a big job. It’s often worth contacting a local dumpster company, with Dumpster Maxx offering a variety of Roll Off Dumpster Denver options to choose from. Make sure that you have the right equipment in place to prevent wasted time on your pool.

Design considerations
There are a number of different pool types available, so don’t just dive into a decision. Look at infinity pools and lap pools for the current trends, but you can even design your own style. Look at the space that you have available and think about local materials that are available for lower costs. Those materials can contribute a lot to your overall pool pricing, so if you can reduce the amount you pay due to local availability, all the better. The average pool can cost anywhere from $10k to $60k, so it’s important that you know your budget and work to the limitations that you set yourself.

Planning permission
In the majority of cases, a swimming pool is classified as a permitted development. You will need to remain within the boundaries of your property and behind the building line of your front-facing property. If you’re going for the addition of a designated building to cover your pool, you will usually have to stick to one-story only, although some states differ in their guidelines. Check with experts in local housing laws to make sure that you aren’t stopped halfway through your project.
Worst case scenario, you can always go with an popular pool alternative.