Posts tagged with "chlorine"

360 Magazine, Purdue University, Swimming pool, COVID-19

Expert: Swimming pool facilities water unlikely to spread coronavirus

WHAT: Pools across the U.S. are set to reopen in the coming weeks. If recommended chlorine levels are maintained as usual, the pools themselves should pose minimal risk of spreading the coronavirus to swimmers, says a Purdue University engineer who studies pool water decontamination.

For indoor pools, the greater risks to coronavirus spread would include poor air circulation, crowds, and contaminated surfaces such as handrails.

EXPERT: Ernest “Chip” Blatchley III, Purdue’s Lee A. Rieth Professor in Environmental Engineering, researches how chlorine in swimming pools reacts with contaminants such as human body fluids, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products. He is a professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering.

QUOTE: “There are no data to show how the coronavirus responds to chlorine, but we do know that chlorine effectively inactivates similar viruses.

In the U.S., the general guidance for keeping pools properly disinfected is maintaining a free chlorine concentration between 1 and 5 milligrams per liter. If a pool has that concentration, there would be very little infective novel coronavirus in the water.

On the other hand, the air in an indoor pool is liked to pose similar risks of coronavirus spread as other indoor spaces. A person’s risk would not be affected by the water. The most relevant issue would be contamination of the air or surfaces in these facilities.”

MORE INFORMATION: Blatchley has studied pool water treatment and chemistry for more than 20 years. His work has resulted in dozens of peer-reviewed published papers on pool water chemistry and he is currently serving on two committees within the Council for the Model Aquatic Health Code to develop guidance on pool management in the U.S.

More information about swimming safely when pools reopen is available at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 6 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at purdue.edu

Writer: Kayla Wiles, wiles5@purdue.edu. Working remotely, but will provide an immediate response.

Source: Ernest “Chip” Blatchley, blatch@purdue.edu. Available for interviews via phone and web conferencing platforms.

5 Top Tips to Looking After Your Eyes Daily

You brush your hair, you clean your teeth, you moisturise your skin, but do you think about looking after your eyes each day? Our sight is such a precious sense, but it is one that most people take almost entirely for granted. Modern urban life is particularly punishing for our eyes. Too much time spent looking at screens means that for many, their eyes are often tired and sore, and the dust and dirt of a city pose a further threat to our eyesight. Don’t wait until there’s a problem, take care of your eyes and build eye care into your daily routine.

Keep your hands clean

Keeping your hands clean is important for maintaining good general health, but it is also particularly important for maintaining the good health of your eyes. A study by Michigan State University found that only 5% of people wash their hands correctly. Dipping those pinkies in water is simply not good enough, they need a proper scrub for at least twenty seconds. Most of us are guilty, at some time or another, of absentmindedly rubbing our eyes but it is something that all of us should try to avoid. Rubbing your eyes, even with hands which appear to be clean, can cause eye related problems such as conjunctivitis.

Wear sunglasses

Sunglasses provide protection from harmful UV rays which can cause cataracts, macular degeneration, corneal sunburn and skin cancer around the eyelids. UV rays are not just a summer hazard, they can reflect off surfaces such as snow, water, sand and concrete. If you wear prescription glasses, you should give your eyes the added protection of prescription sunglasses. Don’t worry, there are plenty of fashionable options available.

Visit your optometrist regularly

You really can’t have your eyes checked too often. The onset of glaucoma has no obvious symptoms and by the time that you do become aware that there is a problem, you may have sustained permanent eye damage. Early detection of eye pressure, which is an indicator of the disease, is only possible with a professional eye examination. Your optometrist can also give you early warning of diabetes, high cholesterol and even cancer.

Wear goggles in the swimming pool

Chlorine is a sanitising agent added to the water of swimming pools to reduce the spread of disease and water borne bacteria. Unfortunately, chlorine strips away the film that protects your cornea which actually makes your eyes more vulnerable to any dirt or bacteria that may be in the pool. Conjunctivitis, red, irritated eyes and even blurry vision can all be contracted by swimming in a chlorinated pool. Protect your eyes when swimming, by always wearing water tight goggles with a strong seal.

Keep hydrated

It is recommended that you drink eight glasses of water a day in order to maintain your health. Drinking water helps keep your skin hydrated, aids brain function and is crucial to maintaining the natural lipid layer on the surface of your eyes.