Posts tagged with "Michael Mann"

Brian Eno’s “Film Music 1976-2020” to Release in Nov.

Brian Eno releases Film Music 1976 – 2020 – his first-ever collection of music from his film and television soundtrack oeuvre digitally on November 13, 2020, and on 2LP and 1CD on January 22, 2021. Spanning five decades, this release features classic Eno compositions and includes some lesser-known gems and seven previously unreleased tracks.

Eno’s long-standing affair with film goes all the way back to 1970 with his soundtrack to Malcolm Le Grice’s short experimental film Berlin Horse. In 1976 he followed this with Sebastiane and a long-forgotten Greek b-horror film, Land Of The Minotaur AKA The Devil’s Men. This led to an unstoppable momentum largely initiated by the release of Music For Films. Early classic Eno film moments include “Prophecy Theme” from David Lynch’s Dune, “From The Beginning” from Dario Argento’s Opera, “Force Marker” and “Late Evening In Jersey” from Michael Mann’s Heat, “Under” from Ralph Bakshi’s Cool Worldand his moving cover of William Bell’s soul classic, “You Don’t Miss Your Water,” in Jonathan Demme’s Married to The Mob.

His 1978 studio album, Music For Films was a loose compilation of material recorded between 1975 ~ 1978. It was intended as a conceptual soundtrack for imaginary films, and only the last track, “Final Sunset” was written for an actual film. It proved to be a fruitful project with nearly every piece on the album going on to be used in future films, including several of Derek Jarman’s, the remake of Jean-Luc Goddard’s Breathless, John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow, Rock ‘n’ Roll High School and Todd Hayes’ Safe. 

Eno again explored this approach with U2 as Passengers on their collaboration album, Original Soundtracks 1. Four of the tracks from the album were used in films prior to release: “Beach Sequence” and “Your Blue Room” in Michelangelo Antonioni’s Beyond the Clouds, “Miss Sarajevo” in an eponymous documentary about a beauty pageant held in the midst of besieged ‘93 Sarajevo, and “One Minute Warning” in Mamoru Oshii’s Japanese animation classic, Ghost in the Shell. Another track, “Always Forever Now” later appeared in Heat.

In the mid-seventies, Eno began a rich and rewarding collaboration with British filmmaker Derek Jarman, who initially commissioned Eno to record ”Final Sunset” for the closing scene to his first feature film, Sebastiane. The collaboration continued all the way through until Jarman’s untimely death in 1994. Including the several tracks in Sebastiane, this collaboration resulted in Eno’s music in four of Jarman’s films, including “Still Water” and “Dover Beach” in Jubilee, “Blue” and the entire score of the autobiographical Glitterbug – his final film. 

“An Ending (Ascent)” and “Deep Blue Day” are taken from Apollo: Atmosphere & Soundtracks, Eno’s collaboration with his brother Roger and Daniel Lanois. The music was originally written for Al Reinert’s landmark documentary of the Apollo moon landing, For All Mankind, although since then, “”An Ending (Ascent)” has taken on a life of its own and is now remembered just as much from Steven Soderbergh’s Traffic, Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later and Miguel Arteta’s Beatriz at Dinner. It even made an appearance in the 2012 London Olympics opening ceremony. And then there’s “Deep Blue Day,” which will forever be identified with Ewan McGregor’s legendary toilet dive in Trainspotting.

Aside from Glitterbug and For All Mankind, Eno has also provided complete scores for a number of other films including Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones, and more recently, Henrique Goldman’s atmospheric Brazilian serial killer biopic, O Nome da Morte AKA A Man Called Death, Slavoj Žižek’s mind-boggling documentary, The Pervert’s Guide To Cinema, Gary Hustwit’s spotlight on pioneering industrial designer Dieters Rams, Rams, and most recently a documentary film on close long-time friend and associate, Stewart Brand, We Are As Gods, which will have its public premiere in early 2021.

Eno has also scored extensively for television, including all three series of award-winning UK crime drama Top Boy, for which he received a BAFTA Award.  Danny Boyle’s Mr. Wroe’s Virgins, which also earned Eno and his brother Roger a BAFTA nomination for “Best Original Television Music.” Other television credits include his scores to BBC Natural World’s Hammerhead, Francis Bacon’s Arena, Neil Gaiman’s futuristic urban series, Neverwhere, and Stewart Brand’s BBC mini-series ‘How Buildings Learn’.

Eno has had hundreds of pieces of his music used in films, documentaries, and television programs, including more than 20 complete scores for some of the best-known directors in the world. Film Music 1976 ~ 2020 is a long-awaited album that finally brings together seventeen of his most recognizable film and television compositions, a perfect introduction to this enormous body of work.

Film Music 1976 ~ 2020 Track-list:

  1. “Top Boy (Theme)” from Top Boy – Series 1, directed by Yann Demange, 2011 
  2. “Ship In A Bottle” from The Lovely Bones, directed by Peter Jackson, 2009 
  3. “Blood Red” from Francis Bacon’s Arena, directed by Adam Low, 2005 
  4. “Under” from Cool World, directed by Ralph Bakshi, 1992
  5. “Decline And Fall” from O Nome da Morte, directed by Henrique Goldman, 2017 
  6. “Prophecy Theme” from Dune, directed by David Lynch, 1984
  7. “Reasonable Question” from We Are As Gods, directed by David Alvarado / Jason Sussberg, 2020 
  8. “Late Evening In Jersey” from Heat, directed by Michael Mann, 1995
  9. “Beach Sequence” from Beyond The Clouds, directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, 1995
  10. “You Don’t Miss Your Water” from Married to the Mob, directed by Jonathan Demme, 1988
  11. “Deep Blue Day” from Trainspotting, directed by Danny Boyle, 1996
  12. “The Sombre” from Top Boy – Series 2, directed by Jonathan van Tulleken, 2013 
  13. “Dover Beach” from Jubilee, directed by Derek Jarman, 1978
  14. “Design as Reduction” from Rams, directed by Gary Hustwit, 2018 
  15. “Undersea Steps” from Hammerhead, directed by George Chan, 2004 
  16. “Final Sunset” from Sebastiane, directed by Derek Jarman, 1976
  17. “An Ending (Ascent)” from For All Mankind, directed by Al Reinert, 1989

TYLER JACOB Q×A

When did you realize that you wanted to be an artist/fashionista?

All my life I’ve had an attraction to doing things in a different way. I never wanted to look like someone else, never wanted to share my fashion secrets or my music because I had attached so much emotion in creating whatever piece it was or if were music it would never just be a song, for me. I was never like my friends and for a while that was a struggle for me internally. Sometimes I would even sacrifice my own desires to wear certain pieces in order to skip out on the ‘reading’ sessions. That still didn’t stop me from trying it sometimes though, I remember I would go to the nearest arts and crafts store which for me was ‘Michaels’ (laughs) and would go crazy getting little things to add to my clothes to make them different but then I would also go to Sam Ash, the Virgin Music Store, Guitar Center and I would feel like I was in heaven. No matter what, fashion and music have always been my life. Like I could sit in these stores for the rest of my life and be okay. That’s how much I loved creating and these stores gave me all the tools I needed.

I have always been a magnet to everything that dealt with the arts. But my biggest passion was singing and even though I’ve been singing since the age of 5, I didn’t know that I wanted to pursue being a singer until my 9th grade year in high school. This is why after graduating I ran straight to NYC all by lonesome (giggles) to pursue music. I was way to young to be running off to the Big Apple as a teen with a part time job at the GAP, making minimum wage. New York City was a monster and I’m not going to lie it almost ate me alive. But only after 6 months of being there, thankfully, so many doors opened for me and it was an amazing feeling to be carefree and pursue music with no walls or barriers. NYC was giving me all the life and opportunities needed in order to grind and continue to grind even when I had not a dollar to my name and had to sing on the train with my friends for food. That part never made me feel sad because I never knew how ‘low’ I was because I never had LOW thoughts, I knew that where I was, was temporary and only for the sole purpose of learning the lessons needed to be successful and to grow and to evolve. Crazy thing is I never felt bad for it, it felt so good to grind for my money while doing what I love. I looked at singing on the trains as my stage per say for that chapter in my life. Today, I have experienced so many different things which I won’t even dive into but it has given me a different appreciation for life.

As of late, I am in the studio recording my album and will be performing in Manhattan, Monday, February at 7PM
Rockwood Music Hall, Stage 1.

What inspired your new album?

I had a full album done and ready to go and visuals that my fiancé (Michael Mann) had helped me out with for my release but after the tragedy that happened I no longer connected to the old music. I have so much more to say and so much pinned up aggression that I knew my only healthy escape would be to express it on my debut album. Which will be entitled, Steven my birth name.

It symbolizes me going back to my roots to find myself again.

How’s life after losing a loved one?

Life after losing a loved one has been very up and down for me. As of recent, I’ve drowned myself in work because I know that is where I’m safest right now. When you know yourself and you want better you keep yourself away from danger. Right now dead time is danger for me so I’m always moving. My heart is in constant pain but I’m learning to live with it. It is a battle I have yet to conquer but I know with time I’ll be fine.

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In Loving Memory of Michael Mann

By Madison Smushkevich

Recently, notable fashion stylist, Michael Mann, sadly passed away. His cause of death is still unknown.

Michael has worked with 360 Magazine, Fashion Bomb Daily as well as Vogue Brasil.

Not long ago, model Draya Michele teamed up with Mann for her 360 Magazine cover. “You pushed for me. When they said I couldn’t be a fashion girl, you said I could,” asserts Draya (on a recent Instagram post). It’s evident that Mann made a sincere effort to see both his clients and loved ones reach their personal best.

Stylist Michael mann, draya michele, 360 MAGAZINE

“From the moment I first laid eyes on you I fell in love. One of the most captivating spirits I’ve ever met. Our journey together wasn’t perfect but it was worth it. I am in disbelief and pain writing this. Rest in Paradise my friend, I love you!,” stated Lil Mama.

Recently, a GoFundMe page was created to assist Mann’s family with costly funeral arrangements.