Posts tagged with "50 years"

Brian Eno’s “Film Music 1976-2020” to Release in Nov.

Brian Eno releases Film Music 1976 – 2020 – his first-ever collection of music from his film and television soundtrack oeuvre digitally on November 13, 2020, and on 2LP and 1CD on January 22, 2021. Spanning five decades, this release features classic Eno compositions and includes some lesser-known gems and seven previously unreleased tracks.

Eno’s long-standing affair with film goes all the way back to 1970 with his soundtrack to Malcolm Le Grice’s short experimental film Berlin Horse. In 1976 he followed this with Sebastiane and a long-forgotten Greek b-horror film, Land Of The Minotaur AKA The Devil’s Men. This led to an unstoppable momentum largely initiated by the release of Music For Films. Early classic Eno film moments include “Prophecy Theme” from David Lynch’s Dune, “From The Beginning” from Dario Argento’s Opera, “Force Marker” and “Late Evening In Jersey” from Michael Mann’s Heat, “Under” from Ralph Bakshi’s Cool Worldand his moving cover of William Bell’s soul classic, “You Don’t Miss Your Water,” in Jonathan Demme’s Married to The Mob.

His 1978 studio album, Music For Films was a loose compilation of material recorded between 1975 ~ 1978. It was intended as a conceptual soundtrack for imaginary films, and only the last track, “Final Sunset” was written for an actual film. It proved to be a fruitful project with nearly every piece on the album going on to be used in future films, including several of Derek Jarman’s, the remake of Jean-Luc Goddard’s Breathless, John Woo’s A Better Tomorrow, Rock ‘n’ Roll High School and Todd Hayes’ Safe. 

Eno again explored this approach with U2 as Passengers on their collaboration album, Original Soundtracks 1. Four of the tracks from the album were used in films prior to release: “Beach Sequence” and “Your Blue Room” in Michelangelo Antonioni’s Beyond the Clouds, “Miss Sarajevo” in an eponymous documentary about a beauty pageant held in the midst of besieged ‘93 Sarajevo, and “One Minute Warning” in Mamoru Oshii’s Japanese animation classic, Ghost in the Shell. Another track, “Always Forever Now” later appeared in Heat.

In the mid-seventies, Eno began a rich and rewarding collaboration with British filmmaker Derek Jarman, who initially commissioned Eno to record ”Final Sunset” for the closing scene to his first feature film, Sebastiane. The collaboration continued all the way through until Jarman’s untimely death in 1994. Including the several tracks in Sebastiane, this collaboration resulted in Eno’s music in four of Jarman’s films, including “Still Water” and “Dover Beach” in Jubilee, “Blue” and the entire score of the autobiographical Glitterbug – his final film. 

“An Ending (Ascent)” and “Deep Blue Day” are taken from Apollo: Atmosphere & Soundtracks, Eno’s collaboration with his brother Roger and Daniel Lanois. The music was originally written for Al Reinert’s landmark documentary of the Apollo moon landing, For All Mankind, although since then, “”An Ending (Ascent)” has taken on a life of its own and is now remembered just as much from Steven Soderbergh’s Traffic, Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later and Miguel Arteta’s Beatriz at Dinner. It even made an appearance in the 2012 London Olympics opening ceremony. And then there’s “Deep Blue Day,” which will forever be identified with Ewan McGregor’s legendary toilet dive in Trainspotting.

Aside from Glitterbug and For All Mankind, Eno has also provided complete scores for a number of other films including Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones, and more recently, Henrique Goldman’s atmospheric Brazilian serial killer biopic, O Nome da Morte AKA A Man Called Death, Slavoj Žižek’s mind-boggling documentary, The Pervert’s Guide To Cinema, Gary Hustwit’s spotlight on pioneering industrial designer Dieters Rams, Rams, and most recently a documentary film on close long-time friend and associate, Stewart Brand, We Are As Gods, which will have its public premiere in early 2021.

Eno has also scored extensively for television, including all three series of award-winning UK crime drama Top Boy, for which he received a BAFTA Award.  Danny Boyle’s Mr. Wroe’s Virgins, which also earned Eno and his brother Roger a BAFTA nomination for “Best Original Television Music.” Other television credits include his scores to BBC Natural World’s Hammerhead, Francis Bacon’s Arena, Neil Gaiman’s futuristic urban series, Neverwhere, and Stewart Brand’s BBC mini-series ‘How Buildings Learn’.

Eno has had hundreds of pieces of his music used in films, documentaries, and television programs, including more than 20 complete scores for some of the best-known directors in the world. Film Music 1976 ~ 2020 is a long-awaited album that finally brings together seventeen of his most recognizable film and television compositions, a perfect introduction to this enormous body of work.

Film Music 1976 ~ 2020 Track-list:

  1. “Top Boy (Theme)” from Top Boy – Series 1, directed by Yann Demange, 2011 
  2. “Ship In A Bottle” from The Lovely Bones, directed by Peter Jackson, 2009 
  3. “Blood Red” from Francis Bacon’s Arena, directed by Adam Low, 2005 
  4. “Under” from Cool World, directed by Ralph Bakshi, 1992
  5. “Decline And Fall” from O Nome da Morte, directed by Henrique Goldman, 2017 
  6. “Prophecy Theme” from Dune, directed by David Lynch, 1984
  7. “Reasonable Question” from We Are As Gods, directed by David Alvarado / Jason Sussberg, 2020 
  8. “Late Evening In Jersey” from Heat, directed by Michael Mann, 1995
  9. “Beach Sequence” from Beyond The Clouds, directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, 1995
  10. “You Don’t Miss Your Water” from Married to the Mob, directed by Jonathan Demme, 1988
  11. “Deep Blue Day” from Trainspotting, directed by Danny Boyle, 1996
  12. “The Sombre” from Top Boy – Series 2, directed by Jonathan van Tulleken, 2013 
  13. “Dover Beach” from Jubilee, directed by Derek Jarman, 1978
  14. “Design as Reduction” from Rams, directed by Gary Hustwit, 2018 
  15. “Undersea Steps” from Hammerhead, directed by George Chan, 2004 
  16. “Final Sunset” from Sebastiane, directed by Derek Jarman, 1976
  17. “An Ending (Ascent)” from For All Mankind, directed by Al Reinert, 1989
360 magazine, range rover

Range Rover Turns 50!

Range Rover today celebrates 50 years of pioneering innovation, refinement, and all-terrain capability with the introduction of the new Range Rover Fifty.

The original luxury SUV has defined the market since June 17, 1970 and, five decades on, the Range Rover has evolved to become a family of desirable and capable luxury vehicles. Its compelling blend of design, refinement, and engineering innovation has ensured its place as the benchmark for all luxury SUVs.

Over its 50 year lifespan, the Range Rover has achieved many world firsts and completed numerous impressive feats. It was the first SUV to feature a permanent four-wheel drive (4WD) system when it was launched, and in 1989 was the world’s first 4×4 to be fitted with ABS anti-lock brakes. Later in 1992, it became the world’s first 4×4 to be fitted with electronic traction control (ETC) and automatic electronic air suspension – ensuring the refined driving feel Range Rover is famous for, both on and off-road. In 2012, the latest generation Range Rover became the world’s first SUV to feature an all-aluminum lightweight construction, making it lighter, stronger, and more efficient.

It has crossed the notoriously impassable ‘Darién Gap,’ was the first vehicle to ever be displayed at the Louvre Museum in Paris, and has even won the Paris-Dakar rally – twice. No other vehicle combines the
levels of luxury, comfort, and sophistication with off-road capability and on-road performance like Range Rover.

With its clamshell hood, distinctive floating roof, split tailgate, and trademark front fender vents, the Range Rover of today can still trace its roots back to the 1970 original. In its golden anniversary year, it is now the most connected, luxurious, and capable yet.

To celebrate 50 years of a motoring icon, the limited-run Range Rover Fifty will be restricted to just 1,970 vehicles globally, in recognition of the year the original Range Rover was launched.

Building on the luxuriously appointed Autobiography, the Range Rover Fifty features a number of bespoke exterior accents in Auric Atlas as well as two unique 22-inch wheel designs. The badging features a
‘Fifty’ script created personally by Prof Gerry McGovern OBE, Land Rover Chief Creative Officer, which will appear on the exterior of the vehicle and throughout the interior on the unique “1 of 1970” center console commissioning plaque, headrests, dashboard, and illuminated treadplates.

“In the world of luxury vehicles, the Range Rover has always stood apart as peerless and enduring,” said Prof Gerry McGovern OBE, Land Rover Chief Creative Officer. “Its unique and pioneering sensibilities together with an unrivaled engineering approach have been the intrinsic values which our customers have admired since the first of the breed was revealed in 1970.”

The Range Rover Fifty will be available in both standard and long wheelbase body designs with customers able to choose from four carefully curated exterior colors; Carpathian Grey, Rosello Red, Aruba, and Santorini Black. In extremely limited numbers, Land Rover Special Vehicle Operations is also offering the Range Rover Fifty in one of three Heritage exterior solid paints reproduced from the original Range Rover paint palette; Tuscan Blue, Bahama Gold, and Davos White. For customers in North America, each example will be fitted with a 518hp 5.0-liter supercharged V8 powertrain.

Full details for the Range Rover Fifty, including pricing and specifications, will be subject to an announcement later this year, closer to the vehicle’s on-sale date.

Now in its fourth generation with over a million sold in its lifetime, the Range Rover is the ultimate expression of luxury. Its unmistakable, sophisticated design and all-terrain capability have ensured the Range Rover is as revered today as it was in 1970.

The Range Rover Family

After three decades as a leader in the luxury SUV sector, the Range Rover became a family in 2005 with the launch of the Range Rover Sport, a vehicle which combines the luxury and capability of the larger Range
Rover with a sporty and engaging driving character. In 2010, the compact Range Rover Evoque made its debut, aimed at a younger and more urban customer base. In 2017, the family grew once again with the introduction of the Range Rover Velar, filling the space between the Range Rover Sport and Range Rover Evoque. Taking its name from the first Range Rover prototypes, the Range Rover Velar broadened the Range Rover portfolio with a statement reductionist design and a technology-rich interior.

Range Rover Historical Overview

Today marks 50 years since the first Range Rover was revealed, but the story goes back even further. During the mid-1960s, in a bid to revolutionize the growing 4×4 leisure market, the Rover car company’s engineering chief for new vehicle projects, Charles Spencer ‘Spen’ King (nephew of the founders of Land Rover), hatched a plan to combine the comfort and on-road ability of a Rover sedan with the off-road ability of a Land Rover.

Development of the first 100-inch station wagon prototype began during the late 1960s, with the first model being released to critical acclaim in 1970. Its blend of ability – highway cruising, off-roading, and even towing in style and comfort – ensured its instant popularity. The original Classic model was cited as an ‘exemplary work of industrial design’ when it became the first vehicle to be displayed at the world-renowned Louvre Museum in Paris in 1971.

The first-generation Range Rover (1970-1996) was originally only available as a two-door when it went on sale in 1970. During its 26 year lifespan, the Classic continued to evolve with the introduction of the four-door model in 1981 and an automatic gearbox in 1982.

The second-generation Range Rover known as the P38A debuted in 1994 and was instantly recognizable thanks to its familiar silhouette, floating roof, clamshell hood, practical split tailgate, and continuous beltline;
all of which continue to this day. The vehicle also displayed an even more luxurious interior without compromising on on-road ability and off-road capability. It also featured enhanced height-adjustable suspension as well as 4.0 and 4.6-liter V8 gasoline engines, providing greater performance than ever before.

The third-generation Range Rover (2003-2012) delivered a wealth of improvements on all predecessors. Engineering innovations included a stiffer monocoque body (replacing the traditional 4×4 ladder frame) and fully independent suspension with interconnected air springs (at the time nearly all 4x4s had rigid rear axles). The interiors of these vehicles were inspired by high-end yachts, fine furniture and first-class airline seats, providing more space and luxury.

In 2012, the fourth generation and most recent Range Rover debuted. It was the first SUV to feature lightweight all-aluminum construction, saving 926 lb (420kg) in weight compared to its predecessor. Featuring a wealth of new off-road innovations such as automatic Terrain Response® 2 and All-Terrain Progress Control, it has evolved to include efficient new electrified Ingenium engines, a plug-in hybrid electric version, and innovative infotainment and advanced driver assistance technologies.

For the past five years, the Range Rover SVAutobiography has been at the pinnacle of the model lineup, with the most powerful and refined vehicles in Range Rover history. Produced by the Land Rover brand’s Special Vehicle Operations division, customers can also choose from the Range Rover SVAutobiography and SVAutobiography Dynamic – which feature powerful 557hp V8 engines and finely crafted cabins.

For more information on Range Rover and the Range Rover family of SUVs, visit HERE.

Show your pride and support The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation

As the world celebrates 50 years of Pride in June 2019, it is important to remember it has been almost 40 years since the beginning of the global HIV and AIDS crisis. Now savvy shoppers can support an important cause — all while looking fabulous — by purchasing this one-of-a-kind  Zac Posen and Ben Smith “Rainbow Love” handbag collaboration sold exclusively on LuxAnthropy.com, with all net proceeds benefiting the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation.

  While much progress in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment has been made, there is still much work to be done. LuxAnthropy is proud to support friend Zac Posen and his work with the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF).  “As an ETAF Ambassador, I see first-hand the impact the work the Foundation has,” says Zac. “What better way to show one’s Pride than by supporting this amazing organization. The bag is pretty fantastic too!

This truly one of a kind item — only three “Rainbow Love” bags were made — is personally signed by iconic fashion designer and ETAF Ambassador Posen, ETAF Ambassador Paris Jackson, and artist Ben Smith. “The sale of this bag will help provide life-saving treatment for people affected by HIV and AIDS,” says Catherine Brown, ETAF Executive Director. “What this means in real-life impact is mental health and emotional support for 35 families or education, testing, and prevention for 46 young people in the USA.  As you can see, these are vital programs needed in the fight against HIV and AIDS. We are thrilled to work with LuxAnthropy and Ambassadors Zac Posen and Paris Jackson on this special initiative.”

“We are honored to partner with Zac and the ETAF,” says Jennifer Hillman, co-founder of LuxAnthropy.com. “The person who purchases this amazing piece will not only have one of the most unique items we have ever sold on LuxAnthropy, they can also feel good knowing they are supporting the fight against this terrible disease.”

LuxAnthropy.com was created with the mission of changing the way consumers shop resale. With unparalleled exclusive access into the closets of celebrities, stylists, influencers, Hollywood insiders, and fashion houses, savvy consumers can purchase new and almost-new designer fashion, accessories, and gifts, all while generating funds for philanthropic causes.  LuxAnthropy’s experts carefully select, authenticate, style, and sell each item at prices up to 70% off retail. Funds for charity partners are raised in two ways: sellers donate a percentage of their commission to a charity partner; and LuxAnthropy contributes 5% of its proceeds to the same charity. Categories currently sold on LuxAnthropy.com include designer apparel, shoes, handbags, accessories and gifts.

ABOUT LUXANTHROPY

LuxAnthropy® is a high fashion resale website dedicated to giving back to charitable partners across multiple categories. Sellers make money and give money, and with each sale, LuxAnthropy donates 5% of its proceeds to the same charity.  LuxAnthropy was created with the belief that environmental awareness and conscious consumerism, along with small but thoughtful acts of generosity, breed global change. #resaleforareason For more, go to LuxAnthropy.com

ABOUT ETAF

The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation provides direct care and support to people affected by HIV and AIDS. Inspired by Elizabeth’s personal passion for the cause, ETAF also engages with advocacy and education initiatives to advance its goal of an AIDS-free world. For more, go to etaf.org

50 Years of the Museum at FIT

Based on a selection of 33 major exhibitions which have consistently pushed beyond the obvious popular appeal of fashion and emphasised its cultural significance, this book is an in-depth introspection into “the most fashionable museum in New York City”, ie. MFIT (the Museum of Fashion Institute of Technology).

Edited by Valerie Steele, one of the foremost fashion historians and curators, Exhibitionism highlights the most influential exhibitions held at MFIT including: Fashion and Surrealism in 1987 on the relationship between art and fashion; The Corset in 2000 which was an exploration of the most controversial garment in fashion history; A Queer History of Fashion: From the Closet to the Catwalk (2013); Fairy Tale Fashion in 2016, a study into the enchanted and emblematic objects as the glass slipper and the red riding hood; Black Fashion Designers (2017).

Each exhibition included in the book is illustrated using installation photos, images of individual garments, and texts that explain the exhibitions’ concepts, scope and influence as well as the objects it featured. Exhibitionism also includes essays about the importance of fashion education at MFIT, highlights the role of hands-on, object- based learning and the inclusivity of minority, or even marginalised, groups.

Furthermore, each author provides an engaging “behind the scenes” look at the process of exhibition making and MFIT’s historic commitment to Fashion.

Becoming AFI × 50 Years

 “This book puts you directly behind the scenes for a story that began with a dream, overcame constant challenges, and evolved into the institution it is today.”Steven Spielberg

“Documented here by the people who lived it, this is a remarkable tale of how a major institution, created out of whole cloth, wove itself into the American fabric.”

Cokie Roberts, author and political commentator for ABC and NPR 

Becoming AFI Celebrates 50 Years of the American Film Institute


For over fifty years, the American Film Institute has flourished as one of America’s great cultural entities. Its graduates, faculty, supporters, and trustees have included such acclaimed individuals as Steven Spielberg, Maya Angelou, Gregory Peck, Sidney Poitier, Meryl Streep, Les Moonves, Patty Jenkins, David Lynch, Jane Fonda, Edward James Olmos, Shonda Rhimes, James L. Brooks, and many other respected leaders in the worlds of film, television, digital media, and philanthropy.

In their new book, Becoming AFI: 50 Years Inside the American Film Institute (Santa Monica Press/October 2017), Jean Picker Firstenberg and James Hindman provide a candid look at how this remarkable organization brought together aspiring filmmakers, educators, and artists who helped AFI become the foremost national champion for moving images as a vibrant art form.

From its early years operating out of the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, and the legendary Greystone mansion in Beverly Hills under the leadership of George Stevens Jr., through its incredible growth into an influential cultural institution at its landmark Hollywood campus under the guidance of Jean Picker Firstenberg, to its continued excellence today under the dynamic leadership of Bob Gazzale, the organization and its history are chronicled in Becoming AFI through in-depth essays written by those who have been involved in its adventures, growth, and success.

 “After being asked so many times what our book would be about, we decided to put together AFI’s history as we experienced it personally,” explain Firstenberg and Hindman. “As we structured the book with the stories we wanted to tell from those years, we realized that some of those stories really belonged to other voices. So, we went to several former colleagues and asked them to join our band. Each chapter tells a stand-alone story about an aspect of AFI, but together, they add up to the full picture.”

Becoming AFI provides an insightful, behind-the-scenes look at how AFI, with passionate determination, overcame the hurdles of advancing technology, political shifts, and new audience dynamics to turn its aspirations into a substantial and highly successful organization, becoming a tireless advocate of moving images as one of America’s most popular forms of art, and maturing into one of the world’s most respected educational and cultural institutions. 

“No matter how divisive life in this country may become, the movie theater has always been a place where we can discover what unites us.”

Vernon Jordan Jr., New York Times  “AFI saved our film history. AFI celebrates filmmakers. AFI trains the next generation. Thanks to Becoming AFI for telling us the fascinating story of its fifty-year history. And a big thank you to Jean Picker Firstenberg and James Hindman for documenting all of it! Here’s to the next fifty!”

Edward James Olmos, actor and AFI trustee


About the Authors
Jean Picker Firstenberg served as president and CEO of the American Film Institute from 1980 to 2007, overseeing the development of AFI as one of America’s greatest national, cultural, and educational resources. She received an AFI Life Achievement Award for Service to the Institute and was named president emerita and a lifetime trustee. In 2016, Firstenberg was named to the California State University Board of Trustees by Governor Jerry Brown, overseeing the largest four-year public university system in the United States, with twenty-three campuses educating the most diverse student body in the nation. Prior to serving at AFI, Firstenberg spent four years as a program officer at the John and Mary R. Markle Foundation. She also served as director of Princeton University’s Publications Office. Firstenberg is a summa cum laude graduate of Boston University’s College of Communications. She has served on several boards, including that of Boston University (1984–1996), the George Foster Peabody Awards at Georgia University (1985–1997; board chair 1991–1997), and the United States Postal Service Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee (2002–2014; committee chair 2008–2014). She has won numerous awards and honorary degrees. 

James Hindman, PhD, has spent his career in cinema and performing arts, creating and leading professional and public education programs at major institutions. During his twenty-four years at the American Film Institute, where he served as co-director and chief operating officer, he was provost of the AFI Conservatory, which he nurtured through WASC accreditation. He was also the uncredited producer of the award-winning feature documentary Visions of Light and the television series Starring the Actor. He developed the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in Silver Springs, Maryland, as well as numerous television projects and international film and television festivals. Subsequent to AFI, he developed and led film schools in the U.S. and internationally, including the Red Sea School of Cinematic Arts in Aqaba, Jordan, and New Mexico State University’s Creative Media Institute in Las Cruces. He is currently on the board of the New Mexico School for the Arts in Santa Fe, charged with creating a new cinematic and media arts program and facilities for the school. Prior to AFI, he served as head of graduate studies in the Performing Arts Department at American University in Washington, DC, having previously taught at the University of North Carolina. Hindman holds a PhD in drama from the University of Georgia and has served on the boards of the AIDS Service Center and LAMP in Los Angeles. He currently splits his time between Santa Monica, California, and Taos, New Mexico.

Patty Jenkins made history in 2017 when she directed her second film, Wonder Woman, becoming the first woman to direct a studio superhero movie and earning the biggest domestic opening of all time for a woman director. Jenkins wrote and directed her first film, the crime drama Monster, in 2003, launching Charlize Theron’s career with many awards, including an Oscar for Best Actress. Jenkins graduated from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 1993 and the AFI Conservatory in 2001.

Dana Gioia was appointed Poet Laureate of the State of California in 2015 by Governor Jerry Brown. An award-winning poet who has published five collections of poetry, Gioia served as chair of the National Endowment for the Arts from 2003 to 2009, and was named a USC Judge Widney Professor in Poetry and Public Art in 2011.

David Lynch, born in 1946 in Missoula, Montana. Eagle Scout. 


BECOMING AFI: 50 YEARS INSIDE THE AMERICAN FILM INSTITUTE

By Jean Picker Firstenberg and James Hindman

Foreword by Dana Gioia

Preface by Patty Jenkins

Afterword by David Lynch

Santa Monica Press/October 2017

Hardcover/$27.95

ISBN-13: 978-159580-094-7


FOR MEDIA INQUIRIES, REVIEW COPIES AND INTERVIEWS CONTACT:

Trina Kaye – The Trina Kaye Organization

TrinaKaye@tkopr.com / 310-915-0970