Posts tagged with "small business owner"

sara davidson business illustration for use by 360 Magazine

Lemonade Day – National Entrepreneurs’ Day

The Lemonade Day Youth Entrepreneurship Program is offering leaders, small business owners and teen entrepreneurs as resources for both the media and influencers regarding the topic of entrepreneurship and entrepreneur education. Lemonade Day has provided educational support to many other youthful, productive entrepreneurs and wishes to continue to spread entrepreneurial education through the country.

Lemonade day is a non-profit organization that aims to inform the youth about valuable business, financial and also character-building life skills that they describe as the “key ingredients of entrepreneurship.” Playing such a vital part in the educational and workforce ecosystem, the non-profit is in 84 licensed markets in the United States, Canada, Bermuda and six U.S. military bases. For more information, visit lemonadeday.org.

The following spokespersons are available for interviews and questions regarding National Entrepreneurs’ Day.

Nicole Cassier-Mason, Lemonade Day National CEO. She is based in Houston, TX.

Joe Daly, Lemonade Day National Board Chairman and Senior Partner at Gallup. He is based in Washington, D.C.

Brianna Garcia, 2021 National Youth Entrepreneur of the Year: Brianna, 9, of Harbor City, California, is the founder of Bri’s Frozen Lemonade and made a significant profit in her first year participating in Lemonade Day. She donated 80% of her profits to the Marine Mammal Care Center in San Pedro. Brianna plans on participating in the 2022 Lemonade Day and is excited to sell more flavors and variety of her product.

Erika and Diego Garcia, parents of Brianna

Heidi Butzine, President/CEO of Lomita Chamber of Commerce: Heidi brought Lemonade Day to Lomita and was a key player in its success. She helped more than 100 kids set up 37 stands in the small, diverse business community with a population of under 25,000.

Mark Waronek, Mayor of Lomita, California: Mark supported Heidi and the Chamber of Commerce in all things throughout the inaugural year of Lemonade Day Lomita. He personally visited close to 20 lemonade stands. He, his wife, and city council members collectively visited every lemonade stand in Lomita.

Mikaila Ulmer, Me and the Bees Founder: At only 4 years old, Mikaila launched her first lemonade business in Austin, TX. From that early experience she started Me and the Bees Lemonade which is now commercially available throughout the United States in thousands of stores. Her product is buzzing off the shelves of Whole Foods Market, The Fresh Market, World Market, H-E-B stores across Texas and Kroger stores in Houston. Learn more at, https://www.meandthebees.com.

Rohit and Sidharth Srinivasan, Trashbots Co-Founders: The two brothers participated in Lemonade Day at the age of 8 and 7 which is how they caught the “entrepreneurial bug” and learned the skills needed to build their own company before even graduating high school in Austin, TX. They were featured speakers at the executive briefing “Business Startup Challenges and Youth Entrepreneurship Opportunities” that was co-hosted by Gallup and Lemonade Day at Gallup World Headquarters in Washington, D.C. in 2018. Learn more at, https://www.trashbots.co/about.

Katie Vonder Haar and Hailey Hertzman, Ooh La Lemon Founders: Starting when they were only 11 years old, Katie and Hailey from Louisville, Kentucky turned their successful lemonade stand into a multifaceted company marketed towards tween girls. They won the 2017 National Youth Entrepreneurs of the Year. The girls have spoken at national conferences and recently started the “Send a Smile” gifts and COVID care packages to help brighten up the day. Learn more at, https://oohlalemon.com.

Business woman article illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Ask Better Questions

Advice from a Researcher on How to Make Research Your Business’s Superpower

By: Kirsten Lee Hill, PHD.

When I talk to people about research, the first thing I notice is that almost everyone is doing research–they just don’t call it that.

Put simply, research is creating an intentional plan to answer a question you have, and then putting it into action. As a business owner, I’m willing to bet that you have questions you would like answered. Questions like:

  • How are people experiencing my products/services?

  • Does my product/service work?

  • How can I improve my product/service?

On a daily basis as you continue to run your business and make decisions about growing or pivoting, you are using information to answer these types of questions. Every time you ask a customer for feedback, send out a poll, or look at records to make decisions about products or services–that’s research!

The quality of the information you get is only as good as the quality of the questions you ask. The key to good research is asking good questions, and crafting good questions is both an art and a science.

To create a good question, you have to get specific about what it is you want to know.

Have you ever asked a client or customer if they are “satisfied?” Or, has anyone ever asked you if you are “satisfied” with their product or service?

Personally, it is my least favorite question, and one that I never ask.

Here’s the thing–I never ask if someone is satisfied because I don’t care. Not asking is strategic. To me, that question is a waste of space (and my clients’ goodwill), and I want to use space and goodwill on important questions that matter to me. Big, vague words like “satisfaction” are not helpful in evaluating my work or making decisions.

What does it even mean to be satisfied?

In some sense it means that I generally did a good job or a bad job. But, I don’t make decisions based on ambiguous terms. I want specific insights to drive my business.⁠

Specific insights come from specific questions.

So, instead of asking if someone is “satisfied” for if they “liked” your product/service, choose an area(s) of feedback that would provide meaningful information. Perhaps you want to know if your product was useful, made something easier, or fun. If you’re selling a new shirt and people say they hate it, that’s not helpful. Instead, ask specific questions about the color, fit, and fabric so that you can take action on the feedback.

Questions are powerful tools that can provide you with information to make important decisions. Don’t waste them.

To learn more about Kirsten Lee Hill, visit her website.

No More Hate illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Atlanta Shooting

By: Carly Cohen × Heather Skovlund

Early this week, a tragedy had occurred in Atlanta, Georgia. A total of eight victims were killed at the Georgia spa. Six of the eight victims were Asian, and when the suspect got caught, he claimed that “his actions were not racially motivated.” It was stated that it was too soon in the investigation to claim this shooting as a hate crime; however, the shootings were “aimed at a recent wave of attacks against Asian Americans that coincided with the spread of the coronavirus across the United States.” The suspect claimed that apparently “sex addition” drove him to commit these murders.

There were multiple incidents: the first occurred at Young’s Asian Massage Parlor in a mall off Highway ninety-two, about thirty miles north of Atlanta. When the police got the call, five people were shot, and two were dead while three were rushed to the hospital. An hour later, after this tragedy, two other shootings happened right across the street- one being on Piedmont, the other at the Gold Spa and Aromatherapy.

There were seven women and one man; most of them were Asian. The victims have been identified as Delainia Ashley Yaun, Paul Andre Michels, Xiaojie Tan, and Daoyou Feng.

Yaun and her husband, Mario Gonalez, were off work getting a couples massage at Young’s Asian Massage when the tragedy started. Her husband safely made it out of the salon, but he and his wife were in separate rooms when the shooting was started. They had a family together; a thirteen-year-old son and an infant daughter. It is sad to say that this woman was a victim in this shooting that not one person deserved -separating families, taking parents, taking siblings. It is a terrible, terrible thing that no one deserved. John Beck, Yaun’s manager, voiced to BuzzFeed News that “her heart was so big.” She would feed homeless people and offer them clothes and a place to shower. Hearing a person who is so kind and so pure as Yaun makes you ask the question, “why do bad things happen to good people.” It doesn’t make sense and is not fair.

Xiaojie Tan was the owner of Young’s Asian Massage as was another victim of the attack. She was known for being an extremely hardworking small-business owner and had such a big heart filled with love and kindness. Her client, Greg Hynson, stated that when he came for an appointment on his birthday a year ago, she had a birthday cake waiting for him. Another victim, Paul Andre Micheals, was a U.S Army infantry veteran married for more than two decades. He was a “dedicated, hardworking, loving man,” his brother stated.

These killings brought a “wave of outrage and attention to violence against Asian-American people.” As soon as social media was notified of the attacks and assumed to be focused on Asian’s, you could see all over the media celebrities, influencers, and people left and right posting regarding standing up for the lost lives and spreading awareness to this hate crime and all hate crimes in general. The media has been outraged and will continue to stand together.

Back to College by Mina Tocalini

Tips to Keep Finances High as a Startup Owner

One of the primary challenges of running a brand new business is trying to keep finances as high as possible, while also taking risks to ensure that the business remains relevant in a competitive industry. To a startup, just about every decision made is a potential risk, as there are plenty of ways for things to go wrong. Thankfully, the potential reward is often high enough that the risks tend to even out as time goes on.

That said, a startup needs a steady stream of finances to keep going — though not every inexperienced startup owner is prepared to keep a stern eye on their finances. In such cases, preparation is the name of the game. Here are some top tips to help keep finances as high as possible as a startup owner.

On the topic of covering your bases

They often say that to make money, the first order of business would be to understand how to spend money. There are few things that encapsulate such a saying more than the use of insurance options for the company. No matter the chosen industry, it is crucial that you have a firm understanding of the insurance you need for your business.

For example, as a realtor, it is all about matching clients up with the perfect home. But, it can be extremely challenging to accomplish that without the necessary real estate agent insurance, found at Next. Small businesses have to take note, as there are specific types of small business policies that can help startups keep a solid level of coverage, without losing too much money.

The benefits of hiring an experienced accountant

Those looking to manage their finances as tightly as possible would do well to hire a professional such as an accountant, as startup management can often mean a mountain of paperwork for the unprepared. That being said, the idea of hiring an experienced accountant is not just to keep the paperwork and finances in order — it is also about understanding which moves to make next as a company.

Not only do experienced accountants have years of practice under their belts, but they can also provide valuable advice based on their wealth of business knowledge. It always pays to utilize experienced professionals to fill the gaps.

Maintain consistency with social media

To obtain a steady stream of revenue as a startup, one of the best ways to get the job done would be to show prospective clients and supporters that the company is worth supporting. For example, maintaining an active account on social media shows online users that the company is always willing to interact with their audience. Even if the services might not be quite there yet, a company that remains consistent in its desire to make improvements based on feedback is often what wins the day.

While keeping finances out of the red while simultaneously taking risks as a startup can be a challenging tightrope to balance on, it doesn’t have to be a miserable process. Making use of the best practice methods above is enough to guarantee a solid foundation.