Posts tagged with "Local Natives"

Devon Gilfillian Livestream Concert

THERE’ S AN ELECTION GOING ON

LIVESTREAM EVENT SET FOR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1

Devon Gilfillian And Friends Will Perform Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On And Other Songs Of Freedom To Benefit The Equity Alliance

Today, Devon Gilfillian and Friends announced There’s An Election Going On; a livestream concert that will take place Thursday, October 1, 2020 at 8:00 PM ET in partnership with The Equity Alliance, Nugs.net and HeadCount.org. Stream the concert live HERE. The artists will perform Marvin Gaye’s classic album, What’s Going On, live. The event will also include special guests playing songs of protest, freedom and community. In addition to Gilfillian, performers will include Aaron Lee Tasjan, Breland, Drew Holcomb, Emoni Wilkins, Grace Potter, Jason Eskridge, Jason Isbell, Joy Oladokun, Katie Pruitt, Kyshona Armstrong, Lera Lynn, Local Natives, The Lone Bellow, Nickie Conley and The War and Treaty. For further details, visit www.devongilfillian.com.

An auction will take place in conjunction with the event. Proceeds from the event and auction will benefit Nashville-based grassroots non-profit The Equity Alliance. Devon Gilfillian says, I don’t have much political power, but I do have the power of music. I decided I wanted to learn the entirety of Marvin Gaye’s album, What’s Going On, and use that music to raise money to fight voter suppression, bring people together, and share the message that Marvin was trying to get across. Marvin simply wanted this country to have a conversation, an informed conversation, on the injustice and pain that people are facing. To simply look at what’s going on. Almost 50 years ago, this album came out, and every word still rings with such relevance.

To bring this music to life, I brought together my favorite artists in Nashville and beyond people who are passionate about the change that needs to happen. Also, I partnered with Equity Alliance and HeadCount for this mission. The Equity Alliance educates communities of color and low-income communities about the democratic process while fighting the voter suppression that still exists to this day in TN. HeadCount has also been on the front lines, making sure people have the tools to use their voice in this election coming up. To me, making our voices heard is the most important thing we can do. People have died for the right to vote in this country, and right now we see politicians making that harder for us. Now is the time to fight. Today’s announcement coincides with National Voter Registration Day 2020. To register to vote or to check your registration status, visit https://www.headcount.org.

Gilfillian’s debut album, Black Hole Rainbow, was released by Capitol Records earlier this year. It includes his top 15 AAA radio hit, The Good Life, a rallying cry for inclusion. Streams of The Good Life skyrocketed after Gilfillian performed the song on CBS This Morning Saturday. The collage-style lyric video for The Good Life incorporates images that Gilfillian captured in Nashville over the summer, during the BLM protests. View the lyric video HERE.

American Songwriter hailed The Good Life as [a] soul-soothing ode to finding peace and beauty in life. The Tennessean hailed Black Hole Rainbow as one of the best albums released this year, period. The album also won a spot on Iowa Public Radio’s list of The Best New Albums (So Far) Of 2020. The New York Times said, Devon Gilfillian, a soul songwriter based in Nashville, made his formidable debut album, Black Hole Rainbow, with Shawn Everett warping vintage sounds toward something deep and strange.

Gilfillian performed the national anthem at NASCAR 2020 on the day they banned the Confederate flag. He recently launched The Good Life Fund, which supports organizations that are doing good in the world, including Give A Note Foundation and Rebuilding Together Nashville. Gilfillian has played numerous festivals, including Newport Folk and Montreal Jazz. He has supported such artists as Mavis Staples, was Grace Potter, Local Natives, Lauren Daigle, KALEO, Michael McDonald, Chaka Kahn, Keith Urban, Gladys Knight, Brothers Osborne and Michael Franti & Spearhead.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Independence Day Drink

2020 Labor Day Celebrations

By Cassandra Yany

In the face of COVID-19, Labor Day weekend looked very different his year. Absent were the large family cookouts and pool parties, or the big end-of-summer beach crowds. Many cities even had to omit public fireworks to prevent mass gatherings. Though the long weekend did not bring the celebrations we’re used to, there were still plenty of safe ways to enjoy the holiday.

Virtual events allow you to take part in more activities in different locations than you would have been able to physically. Made in America, a festival started by Jay-Z in 2012, was set to take place in Philadelphia this past weekend. On July 1, festival organizers announced that it would be rescheduled to Labor Day weekend 2021. They said in a statement “Collectively, we are fighting parallel pandemics, COVID-19, systemic racism and police brutality. Now is the time to protect the health of our artists, fans, partners and community as well as focus on our support for organizations and individuals fighting for social justice and equality in our country.”

This year’s lineup went unannounced, but last year’s festival was headlined by Travis Scott and Cardi B. Since the physical festival was canceled, a livestream showcasing the best performances took place on the music streaming service TIDAL throughout the weekend. The virtual festival included sets from Beyoncé, Nicki Minaj, Lizzo, Coldplay, Rihanna and many other chart-topping artists.

Nationally, a Labor Day virtual race was held by The Best Races for runners to run anywhere on their own time and submit their results. Participants who registered for the full package received a personal coach who was available Monday through Friday to provide help and answer questions during training, and provided encouragement and support on the day of the race.

Runners across the country were able to choose the distance of the race they wanted to participate in. Depending on what package they signed up for, they received a certificate of completion and digital medal, a 3-inch medal sent to their homes, a printable custom bib, a custom digital photo card that contains the race results, a digital running journal, a t-shirt, optional course maps and an optional pen pal program. 

Based in Portland, the Oregon Labor Movement held a statewide virtual Labor Day celebration and call to action on Monday. The organizers brought light to issues taking place in the state saying, “Working Oregonians are facing three crises at once: a deadly global pandemic, an economic free fall, and long-standing institutional racism.”

The event began at noon and featured talks from Oregon’s labor leaders, elected officials, and working Oregon citizens regarding their desire for change and their pursuit toward justice for workers. This event came after Portland’s rise to national prominence for their Black Lives Matter demonstrations and federal agents entering the city in recent months.

A number of virtual events were held in Los Angeles this past weekend, as well. HomeState, the LA-based Texas Kitchen, held its first Margarita Showdown in 2019, but had to move it online this year due to the pandemic and social distancing measures. The virtual event took place Saturday via livestream. Margarita makers in the area competed to see whose drink was the best.

Voters received eight bottled margaritas, along with limes and garnishing salt to try the different submissions from the safety of their homes. The winner chosen was El Compadre, a local Mexcian restaurant. The event was hosted by comedian Cristela Alonzo, and featured musical performances by Chicano Batman, Spoon, Questlove, Fred Armisen, Local Natives and Angela Muñoz. All proceeds from the event benefit the organization No Us Without You! and the Watts Empowerment Center.

The Gourmandise School of Sweets & Savories in Santa Monica hosted a virtual Labor Day Pies class on Sunday. In the class, participants were taught how to make a s’mores pie and key lime pie. Registration for the class included access to the Zoom video meeting, as well as the recipe and shopping list. Recipes can also be found on Gourmandise’s Instagram.

Some cities were able to hold in-person events following social distancing guidelines. Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art, located in the Seaport District, upheld its tradition of free admission on Labor Day. The museum is typically closed on Mondays, but was open from 10 am to 5 pm for guests who reserved tickets. 

Monday was the last day for guests to see the exhibits Tschabalala Self: Out of Body and Carolina Caycedo: Cosmotarrayas. Also on display were the Sterling Ruby, Nina Chanel Abney and Beyond Infinity: Contemporary Art after Kusama exhibits. The ICA has increased cleaning and follows Massachusetts COVID guidelines by requiring all staff and visitors to wear face coverings, and allowing a restricted number of guests each hour. Spaces that don’t allow physical distancing are temporarily closed, and exhibition labels and printed materials have been made available online to reduce touch surfaces.


In New York City, a Labor Day Paint in the Park event was held in Central Park. The two-hour socially distant class was led by a master artist who gave step-by-step painting instructions. Participants were required to wear masks and sit six feet apart. Admission included a pre-sketched canvas and painting supplies, and parties were encouraged to bring food and drinks to snack on during the class.

For those who wanted to enjoy the holiday by relaxing at home with their favorite movie or TV show, a number of stores had sales to mark the end of summer. There were countless deals that shoppers could take advantage of to celebrate their work.
Many workers have faced great adversity within the past eight months, some losing their positions and having to move quickly to find a new one, and others doing their job in a way they never thought they would have to. Whether you stayed in or got out of the house for some socially-distant fun, Monday was definitely a day worth celebrating.

Local Natives Concert Review

On Saturday night, a five-piece-indie-rock band, Local Natives brought the energy to the Palladium with their symphonic tones, unique instrumentals, and airy soft lyrics. The LA native band played multiple songs throughout the night from their new album Violet Streets. This album explores adulthood, love, and friendships.

The band opened the show with a piece called “Vogue” from their album Violet Streets. The band then quickly livened up the audience by singing one of their older songs, “Sun Hands” in which lead singer, Taylor Rice jumped into the sea of screaming fans to crowd surf. 

The fans continued screaming throughout the show, especially once the band played the song, “Fountains of Youth”, which was a song released in November of 2016, right before the elections took place. 

The group finished their set with the song “When Am I Gonna Lose You”, which lead singer, Rice, explained was an ode to love. As the LA native boy band announced their last song, the crowd was in tears. The phrase “encore” could be heard from miles away. The band came back on to perform a few more songs until they had to say their last goodbye.

Complete with stunning light shows, seamless transitions, and phenomenal vocals, the Local Natives seemed to impress the crowd.

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