Posts tagged with "farming"

Wine illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

California Wines × Down to Earth

California Wines Livestream & Video Series Celebrates Down to Earth Month in April

Facebook Live & Instagram Events Share Tips on Enjoying Sustainably Grown & Produced Wines

For “Down to Earth Month” in April, California Wines is celebrating the state’s global leadership in sustainable winegrowing with a series of fun and informative virtual events and videos on Facebook Live and Instagram. Throughout April, the free livestream events and videos will present a variety of discussions, cooking demonstrations, and virtual wine tastings focused on sustainability.

Hosts for the Facebook Live events include Napa Valley sommelier Amanda McCrossin of SommVivant and Aida Mollenkamp, Food Network personality and founder of Salt & Wind Travel.

Videos shared on the California Wines Instagram channel will demonstrate recipes, how to pair and enjoy California wines, and what makes a wine sustainable. Programs will feature food and beverage influencers, including Meg van der Kruik of This Mess Is Ours, Jerry James Stone of the Jerry James Stone blog, Britney Brown Chamberlain of Britney Breaks Bread, and Sarah Gim of The Delicious Life.

To view details on all Down to Earth Month events, visit California Wine’s website.

Facebook Live: Thursdays, 10 am PST

Livestream hosts Amanda McCrossin of SommVivant and Aida Mollenkamp of Salt & Wind taste and discuss sustainably grown and produced California wines. Event replays will be available on the site for later viewing.
 
April 1 – What Is Sustainable Wine?
It’s time to clear up the confusion around what defines sustainability! Participants will learn what sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices are and get the inside story on California’s sustainable certification programs, including the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA) program.
 
April 8 – What Are Biodynamic and Organic Wines, and How Are They Sustainable?
Explore the differences between organic and biodynamic practices and learn how they fit into the sustainability equation.
 
April 15 – Why Is There a Chicken in the Vineyard?
Chickens, sheep, and goats don’t just look adorable in California vineyards—each has an important job to do. Learn how animals are helping California vintners in their sustainable farming efforts.
 
April 22 – How to Look for Sustainable Wines
Finding sustainable wines is easy—if you know what to look for. Participants will learn about the sustainable certifications, logos, and terms to look for on wine labels.
 
April 29 – How California Is a Leader in Sustainable Wines & Sustainable Farming
California is not only a world leader in sustainable winemaking and winegrowing practices, but producers also embrace sustainability in dairy and other agricultural areas. Learn about California’s innovative farming practices and how the state leads in sustainable wine and food.

IGTV Videos: Tuesdays 10 am PST

Every Tuesday in April, videos from well-known food and beverage influencers will be shared on the California Wines Instagram channel, each demonstrating a recipe inspired by the Wine Country Table cookbook paired with sustainably made wines from California. Recipes and information about sustainability will be shared on each influencer’s website and social media platforms.
 
April 6 – Meg van der Kruik of This Mess Is Ours
 
April 13: – Jerry James Stone of the Jerry James Stone blog
 
April 20 – Britney Brown Chamberlain of Britney Breaks Bread
 
April 27 – Sarah Gim of The Delicious Life
 

Tree illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

USDA Forest Service Reflects on 2020

Despite challenges posed by the pandemic, the USDA Forest Service today announced it surpassed goals and set records in 2020.

“2020 was a challenging year, with record wildland fire activity and the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the Forest Service, we have risen above these challenges and set our minds, hands and hearts to carrying out our mission to meet the needs of the communities we serve,” said Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen.

The Forest Service relied on its strong science, innovation and partnerships to overcome this year’s challenges as the agency found new solutions to serve the public during a time of unprecedented need.

Creating healthy, productive forests and supporting rural economies

In 2020, the Forest Service provided jobs and stability for local economies through a year of historic timber production, selling more than 3.2 billion board feet of timber, the second-highest level in 20 years. The agency also improved forest conditions and reduced wildfire risk on over 2.65 million acres, removing hazardous fuels like dead and downed trees, and combating disease, insect and invasive species infestations.

The Forest Service undertook a suite of regulatory reforms to meet the goals of the Secretarial Memorandum to the Chief of the Forest Service modernize and align agency directives with new legislative authorities and reduce regulatory burdens. By the end of December 2020, the Forest Service will have nearly completed all guidance to implement new legislative authorities in the 2018 Farm Bill. In addition, Forest officials quickly began implementing President Trump’s Great American Outdoors Act to increase access to national forests and grasslands and make progress towards reducing the agency’s $5 billion infrastructure backlog.

Managing wildfire, and providing for health and safety

The Forest Service was successful in prioritizing early suppression of wildfire ignitions while facing a record-breaking fire year, with the most acres burned on national forests since 1910. The agency’s modeling research on how COVID-19 may spread between firefighters or in communities during response efforts led to new interagency safety protocols to better support fire camp management.  The protocols not only successfully minimized the spread of COVID-19 among the agency’s 10,000 firefighters, but early learning suggests the safety measures resulted in additional health benefits to fire crews, reducing ailments common in fire camps, which translated to a healthier and more resilient firefighting workforce available to protect lives, homes, and communities threatened by wildfire.

Sharing stewardship responsibilities and being better neighbors

The Forest Service made significant strides toward Shared Stewardship this year, working more closely than ever with Tribes, States, and local partners to make sure the right work happens in the right place at the right time. So far, 44 states and territories are now involved in a Stewardship Agreement. The agreements allow the Forest Service to employ the latest tools and share decision making on the highest priorities to improve forest conditions across broad landscapes. These new agreements have resulted in increasing resiliency of forests, protection of communities and reduction of wildfire risks. They have also produced jobs and stabilize economies.

Increasing access and improving recreation experiences

This year, Americans sought out their public lands in tremendous numbers, finding relief in the Great Outdoors, showing us once again how public lands unite our nation. In response, the Forest Service generated solutions to ensure visitors had every opportunity to safely use and enjoy their national forests and grasslands during the pandemic. The Forest Service welcomed record-breaking numbers of visitors, many of whom were first time users, with 95% expressing satisfaction with their experiences.

“Next year, we will continue to build on these successes to improve conditions on America’s national forests and grasslands to ensure they are healthier, more resilient and more productive,” added Chief Christiansen. We will keep building on the partnerships that make these successes possible and commit to increasing access to better connect people to their natural resources, so these national treasures endure for generations to come.”

For more information about the Forest Service visit www.fs.usda.gov

Stuttgart Beer Festival

This September, Stuttgart is celebrating a bicentennial double jubilee: 200 years of the Stuttgart Beer Festival along with 100 years of the Agricultural Show. The city will commemorate the founding of these two biggest festivals in the state by King Wilhelm I of Württemberg and his consort, Queen Katharina, with the Historic Volksfest that will start a few days before the agriculture and beer festivals. All of the merriment for the Historical Festival will take place on the Palace Square in the center of Stuttgart surrounded by the New and Old Palaces whereas the modern day beer festival and the agricultural festival, will be celebrated on the Canstatter Wasen, once a grassy plain not far from the city center.

On 28th September 1818, the day after the king’s 36th birthday, he founded the first agricultural show to strengthen and reform the region’s farming industry, which had been severely affected by the eruption of the volcano on the island of Sumbawa in today’s Tambora. This volcano had a big impact on Europe and resulted in the “year without a summer,” when gasses and ash caused climate changes leading to crop failures and famine in southern Germany.

The fact that 2018 is the 173rd and not the 200th anniversary of this merry traditional festival is easily explained: by order of King Karl, the Wasen was held only biennially from 1882 onwards, and this continued up to the king’s death in 1891. This, along with the repercussions of the two World Wars, resulted in Stuttgart having to go without its festival for 28 years in all.

Every four years, the agricultural festival still takes place and runs parallel to the beer festival on the Canstatter Wasen. These days, the LWH is the biggest agriculture and forestry show in southern Germany. This year, from 29 September to 7 October 2018, Stuttgart will again be transformed into Baden-Württemberg’s biggest farm. It will include a multitude of topics to do with nutrition, animals, sustainability and agriculture.

Starting on September 26, the Historical Volksfest will be the real draw this jubilee year as it will be a nostalgic view down memory lane for the locals and offer a unique look at Stuttgart’s past for the visitors. History will be the dominant feature of the celebratory Volksfest on Stuttgart main square, the Schlossplatz. Visitors can look forward to a colorful mixture of activities with fairground attractions and rides from times past, including jugglers, acrobats, old traditional crafts and farm animals. Two avenues will include fairground amusements that will be split up into the 19th and 20th century styles.

An exhibition showing the history of the local Swabian people’s biggest festival will take place around the Jubilee Column while King Wilhelm I and his wife Katharina, played by amateur actors dressed in historical garb, will make regular appearances. A festival tent with about 1,000 seats will be a focal point along with a dance floor, traditional dances and bands performing in historical clothes. Classical dishes of the era such as “Metzelsuppe,” a sausage soup, sauerkraut, boiled beef and fish on sticks, will be served with a jubilee beer made by the Stuttgart breweries, Stuttgarter Hofbräu and Familienbrauerei Dinkelacker.

Just two days later, the contemporary beer festival (often referred to as the Canstatter Wasen) gets underway! On the last Friday in September, the 28th of September, the seven beer tents, the two wine tents and the Alpine Village will open their doors to the public and the fairground rides will get under way. Round about the Fruit Column, the historic symbol of the traditional festival, 330 showmen, hosts and stallholders have a wide variety on offer. A double-looping roller coaster, autoscooters or Chair-O-Planes: modern attractions or old favourites – they’re all here at the Wasen. Hearty dishes such as grilled knuckle of pork, fried steak or Swabian “Maultaschen” (filled pasta) are served to go with the mugs of beer.

Canstatter Wasen is a benefit to Stuttgart’s economy not only for tourism but also for the local trades. Traders’ markets have a long tradition in Stuttgart and were part of the original foundation of the beer festival as the traveling tracers brought stayed to sell their goods. Even though times have changed, traders’ markets have remained and are a permanent and much-loved part of the beer festival on the Cannstatter Wasen. Visitors will also be given an insight into traditional craftsmen’s and traders’ markets showing old crafts, such as brush and basket making. In addition, household goods made of wood and other natural materials will be on sale.

As the second largest beer festival in the world after Oktoberfest, the Canstatter Wasen attracts approximately four million visitors including more than 20,000 Volksfest club members (former German emigrants and their families) from New York, Philadelphia and Chicago who regularly visit the Cannstatter Volksfest to affirm and renew their ties of friendship with Stuttgart. Benefitting from the festival are not the visitors but also bakers, butchers, suppliers, the service industry, the retail trade, hotels, transport companies and lots more businesses. According to a market survey, approximately 17,000 people are directly or indirectly involved in the Cannstatter Volksfest.

Princeton University’s Vertical Farming Project

New Vertical Farming Initiative will Provide Cutting Edge Scientific Educational Opportunities for Elementary Students and Enhance School Farm to Cafeteria Program 

As Spring weather FINALLY arrives on the East Coast and gardeners and farmers eagerly await the planting season, Hopewell Elementary School Students in New Jersey have been enjoying fresh, organic produce they grow indoor all year

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University’s Vertical Farming Project announced they will partner with Hopewell Elementary School in Hopewell, New Jersey to develop their vertical farm-to-cafeteria program.

Fifth grade teacher at Hopewell Elementary, Helen Corveleyn oversees the school’s outdoor garden beds, six indoor vertical hydroponics towers and has been instrumental in their new vertical farming initiative partnership with Princeton. Corveleyn will work closely with Princeton University’s Dr. Paul Gauthier, founder and director of the Princeton Vertical Farming Project to develop the program at the elementary school. The on-site, indoor classroom will be fully functioning in September 2018 and will allow preschool through fifth grade kids to mirror Princeton’s program while providing kids with fresh, organic produce for lunch and an invaluable introduction to hands on, cutting edge scientific development.

The Princeton Vertical Farming Project focuses on the sustainability and energy efficiency of vertical farming as they study production rates of hydroponic engineering systems along with marketing and economic feasibility. Gauthier says, “Two of the main challenges that vertical farms are facing revolve around awareness and data sharing. Through establishing a resonant collaboration with the Hopewell Elementary School, the Princeton Vertical Farming Project hopes to educate new generations about the benefits of vertical farming, and to inspire them to expand their knowledge through the application of new, groundbreaking research and technologies, which the farm has been producing. Furthermore, this collaboration will create citizen science datasets, which  will contribute to the improvement of the vertical farming field as a whole. By inspiring students today, we hope to shape the future of farming and reduce human impacts on the environment.”

Room to Grow–Princeton Vertical Farming Project Video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=80&v=zzXkrIuzslY

Elementary students and teachers have embraced the homemade, nutritious lunch options infused with organic ingredients served in Hopewell Elementary’s cafeteria. Their community is excited for the new vertical farming initiative with the goal of featuring 100% of the lettuce in the cafeteria grown at the school. Additional vegetables and herbs will be grown, harvested and featured as well. Principal David Friedrich’s passion for locally sourced, homemade, organic food for his students is evident in the Organic Menu offered at Hopewell. The menu is now in its third year and has seen a 50% increase in participation from the start. Principal Friedrich says, “At Hopewell Elementary School, we are thrilled to expand the vertical farming initiative which reinforces our commitment to sustainability. As the first public school in New Jersey to offer an organic menu featuring homemade entrees, we will now be able to prepare more nutritious meals infused with our own vegetables and herbs grown and harvested by students. The project also supports hands-on, relevant and high-quality science instruction aligned to Next Generation Science Standards.”

Dr. Thomas Smith, Superintendent of Schools, remarked, “Lead by Mrs. Corveleyn and Principal David Friedrich, the Hopewell Elementary School has been a driving force in our district-wide sustainability efforts. The vertical farming project has captivated the interest of students and staff. By bridging the gap between science and nature, students can observe the real-life connection between farming and food by seeing what is necessary to grow and produce the food we eat. An important part of this project is that virtually all of the food grown in the vertical farm will be used in our school lunches.”

Children respond to living organisms in the classroom with excitement and passion. Typically in an elementary setting, animals and insects are a wonderful way to promote living organism studies, but at Hopewell Elementary School, they have captured a unique Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)–aligned curriculum that is plant-based and integrates both life science and chemistry. Corveleyn remarks, “No child is too young to understand hydroponics. The bottom line is, kids love planting something they know they can eat! Creating an opportunity for sustainable gardening for the future at a young age makes hydroponics not just a buzzword, but a way of life.”

Hopewell Elementary secured several grants to sustain the vertical farming project:

Sustainable Jersey / New Jersey Education Association ($10,000)

BASF Corporation ($5,000)

Hopewell Valley Education Foundation ($4,400)

Hopewell Elementary School PTO ($7,000)

Photo credit, David Friedrich. Additional photos avaiable upon request.

The True Story

The True Story About Organic Meat

Company Teams Up With Registered Dieticians And Food Experts To

Help Consumers Make Ethical and Nutritious Choices About Protein

True Story, makers of organic and Project Non-GMO Certified sausages, hot dogs, deli meats, and fresh pork have partnered with registered dieticians and food experts Regina Ragone and Elizabeth Fassberg to educate consumers and retailers about the health benefits of organic and non-GMO meats.

Regina Ragone, MS, RD, former food director at Family Circle, food editor of Prevention and author of Meals That Heal and Elizabeth Fassberg, MPH, RD and CDN, the owner of the food and nutrition consultancy Eat Food who has partnered with Dr. Oz’s HealthCorps and Jamie Oliver. Ragone and Fassberg have spent years counseling food lovers and food creators to improve lives through making better choices about their food.

WhOrganic Apple & Wildflower Honey Chicken Sausageile plant based alternatives are gaining in popularity, the majority of Americans are still eating meat every day.” adds Ragone.

“If we can guide them to make better choices about the meat they choose to eat, we can have a huge impact on their diet and their lives,” says Faasberg.

Animal protein sources, such as lean meats like True Story, are similar to the protein found in your body. These protein sources are considered to be complete sources of protein because they contain all of the essential amino acids that your body needs to function effectively. Plant protein sources, such as beans, lentils and nuts are considered to be incomplete, since they lack one or more of the essential amino acids that your body needs,” says Regina Ragone RD.

Lean animal protein contains several nutrients lacking in plant based protein. These essential nutrients include: heme-iron which is much better absorbed in the body than non-heme iron from plant-based protein; vitamin B12 which is only found in animal protein, it is an essential nutrient needed to help your body make red blood cells and keep the brain and nervous system healthy and zinc which is essential for growth and helps the immune system work properly. Zinc is mostly found and better absorbed and used from animal protein sources,” adds Elizabeth Faasberg RD.

The pair have created tips and recipes to help consumers find healthy and humanely raised proteins to add to their everyday meals now available here.

Here are some helpful tips when choosing proteins in your diet from Ragone and Faasberg:

· For a satisfying afternoon snack try a slice of True Story Organic Uncured Applewood Smoked Ham or Organic Oven Roasted Turkey Breast, a couple of whole grain crackers and a slice of apple. Protein plays a key role in regulating your hunger hormone so eating a protein-rich snack helps you to feel more satisfied between meals.*

· Start your day with a hearty balanced breakfast — to boost the flavor add True Story Organic Apple & Wildflower Honey Chicken Sausage and some greens to your omelet and don’t forget a piece of fruit to top it off! People tend to get most of their protein during evening meals and the least at breakfast. Moving some protein from dinner to breakfast can help with weight management by decreasing hunger and cravings throughout the day. **

· Choosing organic can make it simpler to know more about how your food is raised. Organic meats are raised without GMOs, pesticides, and chemical fertilizers. The foods cannot contain synthetic preservatives.

Check out the newly created recipes by Ragone and Fassberg such as Homemade Colorful Cole Slaw Made with Thick Cut Oven Roasted Chicken Breast, Banh Mi Vietnamese Sandwich made with Pasture Raised Uncured Beef Hot Dogs; and Wheat Berry, Toasted Walnut, Broccoli and Organic Sweet Italian Chicken Sausage at www.truestoryfoods.com/recipes.

True Story’s all-natural line-up offers both Organic and Project Non-GMO Certified varieties. True Story offers a wide range of products such as:

· Organic Thick Cut Oven Roasted Chicken Breast – A 2017 Expo East Nexty Winner

· Organic Apple & Wildflower Honey Chicken Sausage

· Organic Uncured Applewood Smoked Ham

· Organic Grass Fed Beef Hot Dogs

True Story believes in a future of food that is a return to what is real and true and a future that is respectful of the sources of our food – the soil, the animals, and the farmers.

True Story is Committed to:

Supporting Farmers with Good Farming Practices

True Story practices fair trade with farmers, ensuring that the animals are raised humanely and without antibiotics, and creating a sustainable livelihood for generations of farmers to come. All animals are fed an all-vegetarian diet, never given antibiotics or growth enhancers, and live without undue stress or agitation.

Crafting Real Foods

All of True Story recipes are crafted in our California Kitchens with artisan methods used for three generations: hand seasoning and netting of roasted turkeys and hams, using traditional all-natural casings, and hand tying sausage links. Our foods never contain synthetic nitrates or nitrites.

Provoking Honest Conversation

True Story shares the story of their animals, farmers, and communities to provoke honest conversation about how food is raised and prepared. We believe that informing and educating food lovers helps them to make better choices for them and their families.

About True Story:

All True Story foods are crafted using artisan methods to allow the real ingredients to stand out. Made at family-owned and operated kitchens and farms, the delicious meats include organic and Project Non-GMO Certified varieties. True Story offers a wide range of products such as Organic Chicken Sausages; Organic Uncured Grass Fed Beef Hot Dogs and Organic Sliced Deli Meats.

True Story is available nationally in select natural and traditional grocery retailers and Costco. For more information, visit here.

*Source : *A good deal of evidence suggests that protein activates satiety hormone release and so should be most strongly tied with fullness ratings,” said lead investigator Richard D. Mattes, MPH, PhD, RD, Distinguished Professor, Department of Nutrition Science, Director of Public Health, and Director of the Ingestive Behavior Research Center at Purdue University, “but individual studies are often conducted in small populations or with different approaches that can make interpretation of results challenging. Our study combined multiple experiments to confirm the presence of an effect.”

**Source : * Leidy HJ, Bossingham MJ, Mattes RD, Campbell WW. Increased dietary protein consumed at breakfast leads to an initial and sustained feeling of fullness during energy restriction compared to other meal times. Br J Nutr. 2009;101(6):798-203.