Posts tagged with "snickers"

Cookie Pop Candy Pop

The Summer Fancy Foods extravaganza drew in a surplus of foodies this summer at the Javits Center in New York City. Everyone’s favorite food-connoisseur, the one and only Foodgod, made appearances at the Cookie Pop and Candy Pop booth where he indulged in an array of irresistible delicacies.

Foodgod gained his notoriety while being featured as a regular on Keeping Up With The Kardashians. He continued to grow his online presence as an esteemed food lover as time went on, making him now one of the most renowned foodies internationally in the world. His passion for food even led him to change his legal name to Foodgod. 

SNAX-Sational Brands generated three days full of sweet treats at the Sweets and Snacks Expo from June 12-14. Making a special appearance on June 13, fans were able to meet Foodgod himself while indulging in the delicious treats showcased at the Cookie Pop and Candy Pop booth. 

Commemorating the all-new launch of the Nutter Butter flavor, attendees were treated with the exclusive new taste and comforted with Foodgod’s very own favorite flavor, Sour Patch Kids.

“I have eaten at least 17 bags of Candy Pop Sour Patch Kids popcorn this year. When the first case arrived at my house, I went through them so quickly. It tastes like a delicious sweet and savory party in your mouth. It is beyond,” said Foodgod regarding the flavor. 

With such a wide variety of flavors, fans were more than taken care of at the booth. From the new Cookie Pop Popcorn Nutter Butter® made with real Nutter Butter® cookie pieces, to the Cookie Pop Popcorn OREO® made with real OREO® cookie pieces, or the Cookie Pop CHIPS AHOY® made with real CHIPS AHOY!® cookie pieces, it’s safe to say attendees were in for a sweet treat!

As one of Foodgod’s favorites, the Candy Pop Popcorn SOUR PATCH KIDS® made with SOUR PATCH KIDS® Bitz has stormed the nation, becoming an easy fan-favorite. Other Candy Pop assortments included Candy Pop Popcorn SNICKERS® made with SNICKERS® Pieces, Candy Pop Popcorn M&M’s® Minis made with M&M’s® Minis candy and Candy Pop Popcorn BUTTERFINGER® made with real BUTTERFINGER® candy.

In partnership with the Ryan Seacrest Foundation, SNAX-Sational has promised to donate a portion of all sales of the Candy Pop and Cookie Pop flavors to Children’s Hospitals around the United States. Follow online at @cookiepop_candypop for more brand info and @ryanfoundation for updates on the organization’s work.

Foodgod at the Cookie Pop and Candy Pop popcorn booth at the Summer Fancy Foods via Startraksphoto.com / Michael Simon for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Foodgod poses with his favorite flavor Candy Pop Sour Patch Kids for a selfie while visiting the SNAX-Sational Brands Booth at Fancy Foods Show in NYC showcasing Cookie Pop and Candy Pop popcorn.
Foodgod at the Cookie Pop and Candy Pop popcorn booth at the Summer Fancy Foods via Startraksphoto.com / Michael Simon for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Foodgod has his hands full of his favorite Cookie Pop and Candy Pop popcorn flavors such as Nutter Butter, Sour Patch Kids and OREO at the Summer Fancy Foods Show in NYC on June 13th.

Photo Credits – Startraksphoto.com / Michael Simon

AI and Humans: Super Bowl Ads Explore Relationship

Voice Tech Zeitgeist: SuperBowl Ads Reveal Our Complex, Ever Evolving Relationship with AI

By Eric Turkington, RAIN

SuperBowl spots reveal barometers of what the world’s biggest brands think the American public wants to hear. And in 2020, perhaps more starkly than ever, SuperBowl ads telegraphed the complicated relationship we humans have with our AI counterparts.

SuperBowl advertisers often converge around common themes each year based on the prevailing sentiment from embracing nostalgia to championing social purpose to retaining our humanity amidst technological revolution. Striking about the several commercials that featured voice AI in 2020 was how different they were, with each revealing a distinct belief, fear or hope that we harbor about this technology as it becomes an ever more central in our lives.

Here’s a breakdown of wildly different takes I saw about the role of voice assistants at the dawn of a decade.

Amazon goes for humor to reinforce modern AI dependence. Amazon’s Alexa ad tapped
celebrity star power to explore a hypothetical: Real life couple Ellen and Portia wonder what life was like before Alexa. Clearly no expense was spared to imagine humorous takes on this question across a range of faux historical settings, from court jesters to bottle blowing musicians. The ad reinforces the notion of servility:

Alexa is the agent serving the human master while also overtly calling attention to the humanness of the voice assistants’ name (every vignette includes a person with a name that begins with A-L. This ad touches on two controversial questions in voice AI: First, should we be teaching our children to treat voice assistants as fundamentally less than human, worthy of subjugation of our every request? Secondly, was it fair to people named Alexa to have their names be co-opted by Amazon for a voice assistant positioned broadly in popular culture as a servant? Lauren Johnson, founder of Alexa, who is a human, certainly would have a thing or two to say here.

Google tugs at heartstrings by showing an emotional side of voice AI. Considered by many to be among the best of this year’s crop, Google’s “Loretta” tapped into the emotionally raw and relatable circumstance of dealing with a loved one’s death. A man uses Google Assistant–the name is never mentioned in the creative–to remember advice his wife gave him and to pull up memories of their time together. In contrast to Alexa’s portrayal, Google Assistant is playing the role of supportive companion and memorialist. This isn’t the subjugation of AI for menial tasks, but for an elevated purpose that augments the relationship we have with one another, whether living or dead.

Snickers raises that ole eavesdropping concern. Snickers used a generic voice assistant as one of many antagonists in a broader tableau of internet-gone-wrong. An older man sings “the surveillance state’s got a brand new trick,” to which a female voice assistant inside a speaker remarks, coldly, “I am not spying.” The moment was fleeting, but it’s nonetheless telling that the notion of spying smart speakers is a part of the dystopian tech narrative as selfie culture, sexting, and adult scooters.

Coca-Cola makes voice a tactical channel. Coca-Cola’s spot touting its new energy drink did not directly make reference to voice assistants, but Alexa has been among the biggest part of the launch campaign for the same product. Before the ad ran on SuperBowl day, Coke launched a large-scale sampling campaign and leveraged Alexa as a channel for consumers. Using the command “Alexa, order Coke Energy”, consumers would get a free sample of the new product, all which reportedly sold out before the game. While the ad creative was devoid of calls-to-action on Alexa, Coke made savvy use of voice as a sampling strategy to build buzz for the product before its big SB debut. Perhaps if they had a few (million) more samples on hand, they would have included an Alexa call-to-action at the end of the spot

Voice AI has become —and will be even more so — an indelible part of our culture. As voice is able to do more, the references to voice may well become less thematic and topical and even more practical and functional. Indeed, the promoted utterance might be the most prominent hashtag in 2021

Eric Turkington is the VP of strategic partnerships at RAIN, a firm specializing in voice strategy, design and development.