Posts tagged with "fasting"

Self love illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Why Detox Now

By: Edward Jones, founder of  Nutrition World

Are you ready to restart your health similar to how we reset our phones when they get slow and sluggish? The cumulative effects of living, eating and breathing in our toxic world are very often causing our bodys to be sluggish, decreasing our energy, brain function,  producing weight gain and reducing the quality of our life.  

I have been counseling people for more than four decades on the subject of detox for the betterment of their health through my wellness clinic and personal education. Observing my clients over the years has clearly shown me the vital importance of effective therapies regarding detoxification in order to attain results to optimize their health. I will be offering you three steps to effective and healthy detox methods in this article.   

The science of detoxification of every single living organism has been intensively studied and its biochemistry illustrates its varied mechanisms of action. The mere fact that nature placed highly efficient detox pathways within all living creatures confirms its vital importance to the continuation of life. Traditional medicine does not recognize the negative effects of toxins like hormone disruptors, mold, pesticides, fungicides, carcinogens, and the list goes on and on. Even in the best situations where we embrace organic foods daily and clean lifestyle we continue to be exposed to toxins from vaccines, mold in the workplace or home, pharmaceuticals, water, skin care products, suntan lotions, chemicals like Roundup (which is found in almost all foods), and the list goes on and is almost endless. The body has only so much capacity within its system of detox and clearly these days the body is often at or beyond capacity in many individuals.

One of the most stunning studies performed showing the potential serious concerns of toxins in our daily life was on analyzing umbilical cord blood. Not that long ago, scientists believed that the placenta shielded cord blood — and the developing baby — from most chemicals and pollutants in the environment. In the study spearheaded by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), two major laboratories found an average of 200 industrial chemicals in umbilical cord blood. The blood harbored pesticides, consumer product ingredients and wastes from gasoline and garbage. Information such as this can motivate people toward the clear need for detoxification. The first step in assisting anyone with his or her health is making sure they clearly understand and believe in the process itself. Many traditional healthcare practitioners often do not use detoxification as part of their toolbox. This makes education a top priority to achieve success.

For the majority of individuals when they hear the word “detox” they are thinking colon and going to the bathroom. We know regularity does have a place in lessening toxins, but I am more concerned with cellular detox for most of my clients. I always address the issue of regularity and the need to work towards regular bowel movements, but too many so called natural cleansers are nothing more than hidden laxatives. Ingredients such as aloe, cascara, chinese rhubarb, and of course senna are often addictive and are simply cleansing what was eaten over the past few days and not cellular detox.  Nutrition World is very aware of this issue and is devoted to honest education when speaking to customers on this issue. I encourage anyone considering detox products to be an informed consumer. 

Three steps to finding an effective and healthy detox method:

My first recommendation for reducing the toxic load within our cells is fasting. I find intermittent fasting five days a week by eating within an 8 to 10 hour window and not eating the remainder of the day and night is very effective for everyone.  This offers benefits regarding weight loss, insulin balancing, sleep, optimizing glucose levels, and improving brain function.  

Sweating is option number two. Toxins are generally located within the fatty cells and increasing body temperature releases the toxins. I prefer a dry heat sauna for 30 minutes several times a week.  Of course sweating of any kind will be of benefit regardless of how it is done.  

The third option is the consideration of taking nutraceutical and botanical supplements in the form of a detox plan. No one ingredient will accomplish this goal which is why I have three methods of supplementation with natural remedies that further accelerate the process of optimal cleansing. The level of toxicity will determine which detox bundle to consider. You can learn more about the right supplement detox plan for you through my education podcast, The Holistic Navigator. Remember to always consult with your healthcare professional before using any products if you have a health condition.

Source: Chemical analyses of 10 umbilical cord blood samples were conducted by AXYS Analytical Services (Sydney, BC) and Flett Research Ltd. (Winnipeg, MB).

Biography: Edward Jones, is a holistic health expert who has spent a lifetime dedicated to educating consumers about healthy living through his famed Nutrition World, and the preventative health practitioner venue he founded and directs, The Wellness Corner, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Since opening his doors at Nutrition World in 1979, Jones has presented at hundreds of nutrition and health events, conducted numerous media interviews, and has written and contributed to multiple publications, including the book, “101 Great Ways to Improve Your Health.” Known to many as a navigator of health, Jones is the host of “The Holistic Navigator” podcast that airs weekly to educate consumers about the latest science and trends in nutritional intervention, with the objective to help others take control of their own health. An adventurer at heart, and passionate pilot, Jones practices what he teaches through his highly successful wellness centers that are accessible virtually throughout the country. He is an avid exerciser, salsa dancer, traditional archer and devout meditator. Jones once set an “unofficial” world record in 2004 by achieving 285 pull-ups in one hour and for his 63rd birthday he recorded completing 63 continuous push-ups. Through proper exercise, good food choices and nutritional supplementation, Jones believes you can lead a fulfilled, adventurous life, no matter your age, as he has helped thousands of people on the path toward health and wellness.

Edward Jones
Photo provided by Nutrition World

National Day of Fasting

The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival is calling for a National Day of Fasting and Focus on Monday to call Americans to repent of systemic racism and turn toward the work of building a more just and loving society for all people.

Bishop William J. Barber II, campaign co-chair and president of Repairers of the Breach, said the campaign seeks not merely a fasting from food, but also a national fasting from systemic racism, systemic poverty, the denial of health care and from other death-dealing policies.

“We must dedicate ourselves to breathing life into our Constitution and its promises and refuse to accept a civility that covers up injustice,” Bishop Barber said. “The very life of our democracy is at stake. Not the democracy that is, but the democracy that could be.”

The upheaval in the country has shown the power of social justice movements, said Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, director of the Kairos Center for Religions, Rights and Social Justice and co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign.

“People across race, across geography, across age have seen that we cannot be silent anymore,” she said. “It is only when the people organize in radical and bold ways that we can build a society that actually takes care of the needs of the people.”

The campaign is asking people to stand still wherever they are at 5 p.m. , Monday, June 7, and be still and focus for eight minutes and 46 seconds — the amount of time that an officer held his knee on the neck of George Floyd, killing him on Memorial Day. They will then be asked to read a litany that the campaign will share on social media.

After that, Rev. Barber will speak to the nation from Greenleaf Christian Church in Goldsboro, North Carolina, where he is the minister.

People should also remember Ahmaud Abery, who was shot and killed by armed white men as he jogged in Georgia in February and Breonna Taylor, who died in March after she was shot eight times by police who used a battering ram to invade her apartment. As a sign that our collective repentance is real, people will also be invited to dedicate themselves to stay engaged, to vote, to hold elected officials accountable and to work for a moral agenda that addresses historic wrongs and policies that perpetuate inequality.

On Sunday, June 6, the campaign will hold a national interfaith service to recognize the more than 100,000 Americans who have died from COVID-19, especially poor and low-income workers. While President Trump wants to divert attention away from the pandemic and to his misinterpretation of protests in the streets, the Poor People’s Campaign will insist that the country doesn’t forget those who died.

The service will be co-led by Revs. Barber and Theoharis and Rabbi Jonah Pesner, Imam Omar Suleiman and Valerie Kaur.

Doctor Tries Fasting Trend

Real Doctor Tries the Intermittent Fasting Trend and Here’s What Happened http://tourocom.touro.edu/academics/faculty/harlem/niket-sonpal.php

There’s crash dieting, and then there’s intermittent fasting. Crash diets aren’t sustainable and rarely factor in healthy food options. Intermittent fasting on the other hand is gaining attention because people are seeing weight come off, and therefore stay with it. It’s being touted as the go-to way to lose 15, 20 pounds within a month or two. Is it just a popular hashtag or can the weight actually stay off leading millions of people to reach their weight goals? To get clarity, we spoke to Dr. Niket Sonpal who not only is Board Certified in Internal Medicine specializing in Gastroenterology; but lost 8 pounds his first week of intermittent fasting when he decided to do it himself. Here’s what he has to say about intermittent fasting.

What inspired your decision to do intermittent fasting?

I noticed the winter weight became the spring then summer weight and I wanted to take off extra pounds that I noticed had crept on. I was with friends talking about how they lost weight during Ramadan (would prefer religious observations) and that intermittent fasting was a “thing.” I rolled my eyes. I was skeptical. Then I went online and applied my doctor mind to the concepts I was reading about it and went for it.

There are several ways to go about intermittent fasting. Which way did you do it, when did you start and what was the result?

This is true. The way I chose, and the way I would imagine most people would try, is the one that calls for 16 hours of fasting with 8 hours of eating time per day. This basically means if your last meal of the day is 8pm you will have your first meal by noon the following day, free to eat until 8pm again. I figured since I sleep most of those hours, it wouldn’t be as tough as another option where you fast for 5 days and eat for 2 with a 500-800 calorie intake limit on those 2 days.

What were the challenges (if any) that you faced when intermittent fasting?

I live across the street from a bagel shop in New York City. I also have delicious New York pizza on every other corner. Cravings and temptation were there for me for sure. When I left my home and smelled those fresh bagels my brain said. “let’s eat.”

Coming at your intermittent fasting as a doctor, what were some things you were thinking about that others must consider too?

I thought when I would fast. When would be my 8-hour eating period. When we start caloric consumption right when we wake up we do better with weight loss. However, that would mean eating from 7 am until 4pm. This would require a later meal around 3pm. Then I thought, does my lifestyle better allow a 12 noon to 8pm food window?

I also thought about the physiological aspect to what happens to our bodies when we fast intermittently. For one thing, it facilitates weight loss by enhancing hormone function. Insulin levels also lower, plus there’s a rise in noradrenaline. This combination is what helps us to breakdown body fat for energy. While this all reads well on paper there is a lifestyle aspect to it that must be factored in. I’ll add that anyone with a condition should consult with their doctor before going all in on intermittent fasting.

Why do you think it is so difficult for people to fast? What are some of the common symptoms people feel when fasting and what causes them?

When people think of fasting they think of starvation and deprivation. They anticipate they will feel terrible will have a growling stomach, dull headaches, and a bad mood. While these are common symptoms felt at first when fasting, the 16/8 intermittent fasting option allows for food every day. When people see quick results, they stick with it.

What was your diet? What did you cut out and add in?

I looked at my schedule and my overall daily lifestyle and how food was involved. For people who live very hurried lifestyles, food is typically something that is grabbed fast on the go. When we approach food this way no diet will be sustainable. I realized this would require consistent changes in my behavior. It would also require me to get very mindful about what I was eating during the 8 hours of eating time. I chose to eat what I liked in moderation. So, if two slices of pizza twice per week was the lunchtime norm, I reduced to it to once slice. I still ate pasta just not as often and not as much. I also added in a lot more vegetables, proteins, healthy fats and cut out all fast food and soda. Hey, I’m a doctor, but also a human!

For those thinking about intermittent fasting, how would you advise them to proceed?

I would explain that at around the 2 to 4-week mark, someone may plateau. When you notice this don’t think this is the most weight you are able to lose. This is normal and if you are also exercising with weight or resistance training you may be building muscle mass. Pay attention to how clothes fit, body fat loss and how weight loss shows beyond the scale. Knowing how over time the body gets used to intermittent fasting and starts to store up all that is eaten, leading to less weight loss, I suggest resetting your body by eating small, healthy meals throughout the day for a week and then resuming the 16/8 intermittent fasting option again.

People may happily think that they can fast and then enjoy a big bowl of pasta or cheeseburger. What kinds of foods should people eat during intermittent fasting?

You can get results without cutting out your favorite foods which means enjoy that burger or pasta, I did! However, you can’t binge on fast food and think you’re going to make any lasting changes. You want to up your vegetable intake. Things like grilled zucchini or eggplant make for great sides to a piece of grilled chicken or steak. Avocados are a good staple for healthy fats and are versatile. There are loads of recipes out there so plan out your food options in advance, so you stick with it.

About the doctor:

Dr. Niket Sonpal is Assistant Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, Clinical instructor at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn and on the board of the NY‐American College of Physicians (NYACP). He is also the associate program director for the Internal Medicine residency program at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center. He is trained in Internal medicine, Gastroenterology and has a focus on Men’s and Women’s health.