Posts tagged with "strokes"

Inhaler Tour poster courtesy of Interscope records for use by 360 Magazine

Inhaler Announces 2022 Tour

INHALER ANNOUNCE MARCH 2022 NORTH AMERICAN TOUR, TICKETS ON SALE MAY 21, Dublin Quartet To Release Debut Album It Won’t Always Be Like This July 9th

Inhaler announce their North American tour kicking off March 4, 2022 in Atlanta at Terminal West and wrapping up March 31, 2022 in Los Angeles at The Belasco Theatre (see below for complete itinerary).   Tickets are available to the general public on May 21 at 10am local time. Tickets can be purchased here.  The Dublin quartet’s first full-length, It Won’t Always Be Like This, will be released on July 9th on Interscope Records and is available to pre-order here. It’s a record that sees Elijah Hewson (vocals and guitar), Josh Jenkinson (guitar), Robert Keating (bass) and Ryan McMahon (drums) turn their early promise into something special, an album teeming with expansive indie-rock grooves and soaring anthems. We really had the opportunity to explore our sound, says Hewson.

We’re extremely happy to announce our next American venture, says Inhaler. Hard to believe we’ve gone this long without each other.  Can’t wait to play you new music.

The album includes the single Cheer Up Baby, a swooping, epic singalong alongside early fan favorites My Honest Face and title track It Won’t Always Be Like This. Inhaler made their U.S. television debut on The Late Late Show with James Corden in March where they performed  Cheer Up Baby.  Inhaler has amassed a diehard fan base despite only releasing a handful of singles which have been streamed over 52 million times.   

Inhaler will play a full tour of the UK and Ireland later this year before heading to the states for their March 2022 North American headline tour.  The dates in September, October and December include brand new UK tour dates alongside the band’s rescheduled tour of Ireland. Click here for a complete list of UK and Ireland tour dates. 

See below for a complete list of Inhaler’s 2022 North American tour dates

March 4 – Atlanta, Terminal West

March 5 – Nashville, The Basement East

March 7 – Washington DC, 9:30 Club

March 8 – Philadelphia, Theatre Of Living Arts

March 10 – New York, Irving Plaza

March 11 – Brooklyn, Warsaw

March 12 – Boston, Royale

March 14 – Toronto, Phoenix Concert Theatre

March 15 – Detroit, St Andrews Hall

March 17 – Chicago, House Of Blues

March 18 – Milwaukee, Rave II

March 19 – Minneapolis, First Avenue

March 21 – Denver, Summit Music Hall

March 22 – Salt Lake City, The Depot

March 24 – Vancouver, The Commodore Ballroom

March 25 – Seattle, The Showbox

March 26 – Portland, Wonder Ballroom

March 28 – San Francisco, The Fillmore

March 29 – San Diego, The Observatory North Park

March 31 – Los Angeles, The Belasco  

Inhaler formed while still at school in Dublin, bonding over a love of Joy Division, The Stone Roses, Kings Of Leon, The Strokes, Interpol, The Cure and more. A string of captivating singles and their fevered live show have earned them a diehard fanbase. The band were originally meant to begin recording It Won’t Always Be Like This in March 2020 but their plans were derailed by lockdown. Instead of moping, they used the period as a time to rethink and reimagine what their debut album could be.

Follow Inhaler via their Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

Black Rob and Sean Combs illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Black Rob Has Passed Away

Black Rob, Rapper and Former Bad Boy Artist, Has Passed Away at 52 Years Old

Best known for his 2000 single “Whoa!” the rapper was recently hospitalized in Atlanta

Robert Ross, the rap artist known as Black Rob, died April 17 at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. Fellow Bad Boy rapper Mark Curry stated the cause of death was cardiac arrest, according to Pitchfork. He added that Black Rob was dealing with a number of health issues prior to his death, including lupus, kidney failure, diabetes, and multiple strokes. Black Rob was 52 years old.

“I don’t know where to begin this, but I thank everybody for the donations. Rob passed away about an hour ago,” a teary-eyed Curry said in a video. “I need for his daughter, Iona Ross, little Robert Ross, y’all get in touch with me, please.”

In a second video, Curry stated that he had spoken to Bad Boy founder Combs for the first time in 15 years following Rob’s passing.

“I just want to say thank you. We really did some amazing stuff. RIP to my brother. I was dead with him, I was dead with him,” Curry said. “I ain’t talk to Puff in 15 years. We talked today. This is the beginning of a new us. Rob made sure he knew what he had to do before he parted this world to make sure we all alright — and that’s what he did. Bad Boy for life, yo.”

Diddy posted a tribute on Instagram, stating: “Rest in power King @therealblackrob! As I listen to your records today there’s one thing that they all have in common! You have made millions of people all over the world feel good and dance! You are one of a kind! GOD BLESS! Love. You will be truly missed!!!!”

Born Robert Ross in Buffalo, N.Y., the Bad Boy rapper grew up in East Harlem where he began rapping as a preteen leading to the formation of his first group, the Schizophrenics. He released four studio albums, his most successful being his 2000 debut “Life Story.” Rob is best known for his hit single “Whoa!” which peaked at No. 43 on the Billboard Hot 100. Along with Curry, Rob was featured on Sean “P. Diddy” Combs’ “Bad Boy 4 Life,” which charted at No. 33. Though he left Bad Boy Records in the mid-2000s, Rob reunited with the crew for select dates of the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour in 2016.

Neurological illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Houston Methodist × Rice University

Houston Methodist, Rice U. launch neuroprosthetic collaboration


Center for Translational Neural Prosthetics and Interfaces to focus on restoring brain function after disease, injury

Neurosurgery’s history of cutting diseases out of the brain is morphing into a future in which implanting technology intothe brain may help restore function, movement, cognition and memory after patients suffer strokes, spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders. Rice University and Houston Methodist have forged a partnership to launch the Center for Translational Neural Prosthetics and Interfaces, a collaboration that brings together scientists, clinicians, engineers and surgeons to solve clinical problems with neurorobotics.  

“This will be an accelerator for discovery,” said center co-director Dr. Gavin Britz, chair of the Houston Methodist Department of Neurosurgery. “This center will be a human laboratory where all of us — neurosurgeons, neuroengineers, neurobiologists — can work together to solve biomedical problems in the brain and spinal cord. And it’s a collaboration that can finally offer some hope and options for the millions of people worldwide who suffer from brain diseases and injuries.”

Houston Methodist neurosurgeons, seven engineers from the Rice Neuroengineering Initiative and additional physicians and faculty from both institutions form the center’s core team. The center also plans to hire three additional engineers who will have joint appointments at Houston Methodist and Rice. Key focus areas include spinal cord injury, memory and epilepsy studies, and cortical motor/sensation conditions.

“The Rice Neuroengineering Initiative was formed with this type of partnership in mind,” said center co-director Behnaam Aazhang, Rice’s J.S. Abercrombie Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, who also directs the neuroengineering initiative, which launched in 2019 to bring together the brightest minds in neuroscience, engineering and related fields to improve lives by restoring and extending the capabilities of the human brain. “Several core members, myself included, have existing collaborations with our colleagues at Houston Methodist in the area of neural prosthetics. The creation of the Center for Translational Neural Prosthetics and Interfaces is an exciting development toward achieving our common goals.”

The physical space for the center’s operation includes more than 25,000 square feet of Rice Neuroengineering Initiative laboratories and experimental spaces in the university’s BioScience Research Collaborative, as well as an extensive build-out underway at Houston Methodist’s West Pavilion location that’s expected to be completed late this year. The Houston Methodist facility will include operating rooms and a human laboratory where ongoing patient/volunteer diagnosis and assessment, device fabrication and testing, and education and training opportunities are planned.

“This partnership is a perfect blend of talent,” said Rice’s Marcia O’Malley, a core member of both the new center and university initiative and the Thomas Michael Panos Family Professor in Mechanical Engineering. “We will be able to design studies to test the efficacy of inventions and therapies and rely on patients and volunteers who want to help us test our ideas. The possibilities are limitless.”

Houston Methodist neurobiologist Philip Horner describes the lab as “a merging of wetware with hardware,” where robotics, computers, electronic arrays and other technology — the hardware — is incorporated into the human brain or spinal cord — the wetware. The centerpiece of this working laboratory is a zero-gravity harness connected to a walking track, with cameras and sensors to record feedback, brain activity and other data.

While the Houston Methodist space is being built, collaborations already are underway between the two institutions, which sit across Main Street from one another in the Texas Medical Center. Among them are the following:

  • O’Malley and Houston Methodist’s Dr. Dimitry Sayenko, assistant professor of neurosurgery, will head the first pilot project involving the merging of two technologies to restore hand function following a spinal cord injury or stroke. O’Malley will pair the upper limb exoskeleton she invented with Sayenko’s noninvasive stimulator designed to wake up the spinal cord. Together, they hope these technologies will help patients achieve a more extensive recovery — and at a faster pace.
  • Rice neuroengineer Lan Luan, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, and Britz, a neurosurgeon, are collaborating on a study to measure the neurovascular response following a subarachnoid hemorrhage, a life-threatening stroke caused by bleeding just outside the brain. Two-thirds of people who suffer these brain bleeds either die or end up with permanent disabilities. Luan invented very small and flexible electrodes that can be implanted in the brain to measure, record and map its activities. Her work with mice could lead to human brain implants that may help patients recover from traumatic brain injuries caused by disease or accidents.
  • Aazhang, Britz and Taiyun Chi, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Rice, are collaborating on the detection of mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) from multimodal observations and on alleviating mTBI using neuromodulations. This project is of particular interest to the Department of Defense.