Posts tagged with "green space"

Baseball illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

All American Grass

All American Grass at the Baseball Field

By: Lively Root

An American past time, baseball wouldn’t be quite what it is without the peanuts and popcorn and, of course, the field. Surprisingly, most fields don’t seem to give you any stats on the green so Livelyroot gives us the scoop:

Patterns
Most greens are taken care of by the groundskeepers at the park and, without a doubt, they take pride in the patterns they create. From checkerboards to logos, circles, and diamonds a-plenty, this process is known as lawn striping, and it’s done by using old-fashioned mowers that have a roller behind the blades. It’s this roller that bends the grass to create the patterns. To create a checkerboard, a mower would pass over the grass in side-by-side rows, first going north to south and then east to west, intersecting the stripes.

Varieties
At most ballparks, they use different types of grass depending on how they want to enhance the game and look of the field. Usually you’ll find fescues, rye, and bluegrass. If they use warm season grass, there’s likely less contrast to the patterns because they have to use Bermuda.


Learn more about the different types of grass at each stadium below.

Angel Stadium – Tifway 419 bermudagrass
A product of West Coast Turf, the playing surface used in Anaheim is the only one in MLB that is on native soil without a drainage system installed underneath it. The reason for the unusual distinction? The threat of a rainout is almost non-existent. In fact, the Angels have been rained out at home just once in the last 20 years (July 19, 2015). So, it doesn’t really matter that the grass here sits on top of soil rather than sand, as is the helpful for water drainage custom elsewhere.

AT&T Park – Tifway 419 bermudagrass
Grown in Stockton, CA by Delta Bluegrass Company. In the past, the Giants used a Kentucky bluegrass blend called “Blue Rye” that was provided by the same company to cover their field.

Busch Stadium – Kentucky bluegrass
Grown by Graff’s Turf Farms in Fort Morgan, CO, from where the first batch of sod used at the Cardinals’ stadium arrived in March 2006 via 28 flatbed trucks. The field has since been resodded multiple times using Graff’s grass.

Camden Yards – Kentucky bluegrass
Tuckahoe Turf Farms in Hammonton, NJ supplies the turf for Baltimore’s field and its sod farm, which is in center field, behind the batter’s eye. So, it’s from there where grass patches are pulled during the season when repairs are needed. And the Orioles haven’t always used Tuckahoe. For example, when resodding Camden Yards in November 2005 the team chose grass from Collins Wharf Sod Farm in Eden, MD.

Chase Field – Bull’s Eye Bermuda grass
Made by West Coast Turf, who commercially sells the stuff as BOBSod, a play on the nickname of Bank One Ballpark (BOB), the original name of Chase Field and what the D-backs’ home was called when Bull’s Eye Bermuda was installed in 1999. For its first season, the Phoenix ballpark used a zoysia blend called DeAnza, which browned badly over the summer. So, it was replaced by Bull’s Eye, which was designed to thrive in warm to hot climates and has the best shade tolerance of all bermuda grasses, therefore making it ideal for a desert-based retractable-roof stadium.

Citi Field – Kentucky bluegrass
According to Citi Field’s Twitter feed, the playing field consists of four different strains of Kentucky bluegrass. Apollo, Midnight Star, Moonlight and P105 are the specific strains.

Citizens Bank Park – Riviera Bermuda grass (outfield) and Kentucky bluegrass (infield)
To fully cover the Phillies’ field, 101,000 square feet of grass is needed, and all of it was provided by Collins Wharf Sod Farm of Eden, MD. In 2012, their Bermuda blend replaced entirely what had been an all-Kentucky bluegrass field partly due to its ability to better withstand Philadelphia’s weather extremes. However, in 2016 the thicker-than-Bermuda bluegrass was reinstalled in the infield, with the change made to slow down ground balls, which was desired by Phillies personnel, who made the request for the switch. Thus, two different types of Maryland-grown grass now cover the two distinct areas of Philly’s field.

Comerica Park – Kentucky bluegrass
Supplied by Graff’s Turf Farms in Fort Morgan, CO and was laid down in 2014, when Detroit’s field was fully resodded for the first time since 2007.

Coors Field – Kentucky bluegrass blend
The Rockies get their grass from a Colorado company, Graff’s Turf Farms, that is 75 miles northeast of where they play ball in Denver. The five-variety blend of dwarf type Kentucky bluegrass that is used at Coors Field is intended to have a lifespan of about six years.

Dodger Stadium – Tifway 419 bermudagrass overseeded with perennial ryegrass
Grown by West Coast Turf in Palm Desert, CA, where a Bermuda hybrid is overseeded with rye, which is better tolerant to the normally cool temperatures at the beginning of the season. By the summer months the more heat-tolerant Bermuda grass supplants the ryegrass.

Fenway Park – Kentucky bluegrass
The oldest ballpark in baseball gets its grass from New Jersey, and specifically Tuckahoe Turf Farms.

Globe Life Park – Tifway 419 bermudagrass
The Rangers’ grass is Texas grown, as it comes from Tri-Tex Grass, which appropriately has three Texas locations. The current Bermuda blend used in the infield replaced a zoysia in 2013. The outfield has been covered with the same Tifway 419 for a while.

Great American Ball Park – Perennial ryegrass mixture
Ryegrass replaced Kentucky bluegrass on Cincinnati’s field in 2007, when a five-way blend was laid down prior to the season, with the grass a mixture of stuff called Exacta II, Fiesta IV, Linedrive GLS, Panther GLS and SR4600. The original perennial ryegrass sod was used through 2012. When the Reds announced a new field of perennial ryegrass would debut in 2013, they noted it was grown at farms in southeastern Indiana.

Guaranteed Rate Field – Kentucky bluegrass
Really no information is available on the grass used on the South Side of Chicago, other than it’s tended to by “The Sodfather,” the nickname bestowed upon third-generation MLB head groundskeeper Roger Bossard, who assumed the White Sox job in 1983 after taking over for his father, Gene, who had been the head groundskeeper at old Comiskey Park since 1940. So the bluegrass sod at the Cell is watched over by the most experienced caretaker possible.

Kauffman Stadium – Grass blend that varies during the season
As the season progresses, the grass composition at the Royals’ stadium is altered. Its Bermuda is fine for the warm months but cooler times of the season see the grounds crew mixing in bluegrass, fescue or rye, choices which keep the field aesthetically pleasing when temperatures are not ideal for grass growth.

Marlins Park – Platinum TE paspalum
The ballpark debuted in 2012 with a field full of Celebration bermudagrass, began 2013 with an outfield of Tifway 419 Bermuda and infield of Platinum TE paspalum, and finally in 2014 the whole field was covered with the paspalum, which handles Miami’s hot and humid weather much better than the other two grasses the Marlins tried.

Miller Park – Kentucky bluegrass
The four-blend field of bluegrass that the Brewers use is covered during much of the offseason by a special tarp that helps it go through the proper growing cycle so that the playing surface is ready in time for Opening Day. The sod seen at Miller Park is a product of Robert Heath Farms in Coloma, WI.

Minute Maid Park – Seashore Paspalum
In late 2008, the Astros resodded their field with a new kind of turf grass called Platinum TE paspalum. Grown by Phillip Jennings Turf Farms in Soperton, GA, it was invented in 2007 by a company in Florida and is ideal for a retractable roofed stadium due to the lower sunlight requirements needed to maintain its dark green color. While what the Astros now get from Georgia goes by the name Seashore Paspalum, it’s not used on the ballpark’s most notable feature, Tal’s Hill, which is covered by zoysia grass.

Nationals Park – Kentucky bluegrass
When they played at RFK Stadium, the Nationals did so on a Bermuda grass field, mainly because that kind of sod was ideal for soccer and RFK was also home to a Major League Soccer team (D.C. United). When the Nationals finally got a home of their own in 2008, Kentucky bluegrass from New Jersey’s Tuckahoe Turf Farms was chosen for the baseball-only playing surface. The original crop lasted four years then was replaced by the same stuff, which the Nats say is a three-way blend of bluegrass, with Brilliant, Midnight Star and Princeton 105 the varieties used.

Oakland Coliseum – Kentucky bluegrass
The A’s (and Raiders) play on a field of Kentucky bluegrass and West Coast Turf grows what the Coliseum needs on one of their California-based farms. While the type of turf used in Oakland has changed over the years, because the Coliseum is the only venue to host MLB and NFL teams its field must be resodded every year, which happens about a month before the baseball season.

Petco Park – Bandera Bermuda
In 2014, the Padres made the decision to try a new type of Bermuda sod, replacing the “Bull’s Eye” variety that had always been used at Petco Park with what their grass provider, West Coast Turf, calls Bandera, a California-grown grass that doesn’t need much water to thrive.

PNC Park – Kentucky bluegrass
The sod that the Pirates use was grown in New Jersey at Tuckahoe Turf Farms, where four blends of bluegrass were mixed to produce the Pittsburgh playing field. As of the 2009 season, the varieties of bluegrass that comprise the Bucs’ mixture are: Brilliant, Midnight Star, Moonlight and P105. That’s different from when PNC Park opened, as strains with names such as Abbey and Ascot were a part of the Pirates’ original hybrid Kentucky bluegrass field, which came from Berrien Springs, Michigan and a place called the Magic Carpet Turf Farms.

Progressive Field – Kentucky bluegrass
The Indians are one of a handful of MLB clients of Tuckahoe Turf Farms, from whom they now get sod that is grown in New Jersey. The ballpark’s original Kentucky bluegrass came from a state much closer to Ohio, however, as it was grown in neighboring Indiana.

Rogers Centre – AstroTurf 3D Xtreme
The days of a fake field in Toronto are numbered, as the Blue Jays plan to install real grass inside their retractable-roofed home for the 2018 season. So, the now-used turf, which was first laid down in 2015, has only three baseball seasons to get through, although the Rogers Centre baseball field often must be rolled up so the floor underneath can be used for the numerous non-baseball events the venue hosts. The Jays’ current version of AstroTurf, which when removed equals 145 rolls, replaced the AstroTurf GameDay Grass 3D surface that debuted in 2010. AstroTurf is made in the “Carpet Capital of the World,” as Dalton, Georgia is often referred to.

Safeco Field – Kentucky bluegrass and perennial ryegrass mixture
The Mariners’ turf hails from the Washington state capital, as it’s grown by Country Green Turf Farms of Olympia. Except for as-needed repairs, the original playing surface went unaltered through the 2011 season, after which new 100% Kentucky bluegrass sod was installed in the infield. Elsewhere, the grass is a combination of four kinds of bluegrass and two types of perennial ryegrass.

SunTrust Park – Seashore Paspalum Platinum TE
The new home of the Braves is covered with 109,000 square feet of sod that was grown in Foley, AL at Bent Oak Farm before it was installed March 4-5, 2017 in the suburban Atlanta ballpark. SunTrust Park is about 15 miles northwest of Turner Field, where the Braves used the Alabama-grown paspalum grass only in the infield from 2012-2016, when the team used Tifway 419 bermudagrass in the outfield. Now the Braves’ field is completely covered with the same type of grass, which was grown a couple miles from the Gulf of Mexico, making “Seashore” an apt descriptive name for the type of paspalum used.

Target Field – Kentucky bluegrass
Graff’s Turf Farms grew the Twins their grass in Fort Morgan, CO, from where it was transported to Minneapolis in 19 refrigerated trucks. The team and manufacturer both refer to the sod that was installed at Target Field as a 4-way blend of Kentucky bluegrass.

Tropicana Field – TruHop Synthetic Turf
The Rays’ current carpet was installed in time for the 2018 season and was essentially a do-over for the previous surface, which was only used for the 2017 season, after which a replacement was deemed necessary for an aesthetic reason: the initial edition of the TruHop “Triple Crown” synthetic turf manufactured by Shaw Sports Turf didn’t look right on TV. So the 143,370 square feet of it was removed and replaced with a darker colored version of the same style of turf, which then became the sixth artificial field used in the Trop’s history. Prior to switching to a surface made by Calhoun, Georgia-based Shaw, the majors’ only remaining domed stadium had used a fake field supplied by another Georgia company, the well-known AstroTurf brand, as their GameDay Grass 3D was the field of choice for the Rays from 2011-2016.

Wrigley Field – Kentucky bluegrass
The Friendly Confines finds their grass in Colorado, where it’s grown for the Cubs by Graff’s Turf Farms. Since 2008, the sod at Wrigley has taken root on a level playing field. Prior to then, right field was uneven, and the field had a crown to assist in water drainage.

Yankee Stadium – Kentucky bluegrass
Since 2000, the Yankee Stadium grass has come from East Coast Sod & Seed in Pilesgrove, NJ. The sod farm there was purchased in 2000 by Long Island-based DeLea Sod Farms, from whom the Yankees had, on an on and off basis, purchased their field grass over the four decades preceding the opening of the current Stadium.

Field Facts

Kentucky bluegrass is easily the most popular type of playing surface found in major league baseball; it’s the full field grass of choice for 16 ballparks. Additionally, a 17th ballpark, Citizens Bank Park, has a Kentucky bluegrass infield. Eight ballparks have a bermudagrass field, with Tifway 419 the most common variety. Bandera, Bull’s Eye and Riviera bermudagrass are each used at a single ballpark. Tifway 419 bermudagrass gets its name from where it was developed: Tifton, Georgia. At least 10 grass farms provide sod for major league teams. Graff’s Turf Farms, Tuckahoe Turf Farms and West Coast Turf are each the grass growers for five MLB ballparks, which mean those three farms provide the sod for half of all ballparks. Fake grass, like AstroTurf and FieldTurf, has mostly become a field surface of the past thanks to the new generation of ballparks. Teams to directly move from a stadium with a turfed field into a new grass-filled ballpark are the Mariners (1999), Astros (2000), Pirates (2001), Phillies (2004) and Twins (2010). Outfield dimensions are what sets each ballpark’s playing field apart, since rulebook defined distances make all infields the same size and shape. As for the span of minimum and maximum measurements to straight away center field and the left and right field foul poles, they are: Left field: 310′ at Fenway Park to 355′ at Wrigley Field
Center field: 395′ at Dodger Stadium to 436′ at Minute Maid Park
Right field: 302′ at Fenway Park to 353′ at Wrigley Field

More about Lively Root

At Lively Root, the green spaces created have been instrumental in development as horticulturists, for an ideal green space. Lively Root’s plants are home-grown and full-scale fulfillment centers. They only sell eco-friendly products that are packaged and delivered right to your doorstep. Founding members have over a century of horticultural experience as growers, retailers, and landscapers, ranging from small plants to indoor plants, outdoor plants, large trees, and flowering shrubs. They have planted & maintained trees on residential and commercial properties. Plants improve health by purifying the air, soothing stress, making people feel happier, and offering style and ambiance. 

Easter illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Plant-Based Easter Basket

Spring is a few weeks away, and holidays are coming up too. Many want to put some spring-like decorations on the table or use them as a centerpiece. But some don’t know where to begin. Lively Root wants to guide you through the process so you can use what you have on the shelves while also using your indoor plants!

What type of container?
Let’s build a table arrangement together. Start with digging through your old Easter baskets, containers of any shape, size, or color (painting is optional later). Set them all out.

Gather the Extras
Then pull together any accessories you might want to use in your display. You can use Easter motifs like eggs, crosses, bunnies, carrots, cabbages, etc. We will use birds, eggs, and nests for our presentation so the arrangement could be in use for longer than just one holiday. You may even venture out on a walk and pick up bits of nature to use too. Mosses, twigs, dried cones, or leaves can also be a part of the collection.

Grouping Plants and What to Consider
Next, gather your houseplants in the 4-6″ grower pot containers that you have. Different heights would be excellent, as well as those that have pretty colored leaves or blooms. For this presentation, the kalanchoes and Neanthe Bella Palm, Snake plant, English ivy gold child, spider plant, and pink polka dot plant are compatible because they all like to dry out between waterings. As you assemble plants in groupings, you’ll want to consider their light needs as well as watering and humidity needs. You may want to use this assembly temporarily or for several weeks. It will be easier to maintain if all the plants take basically the same type of care.

Recycle and Repurpose
If this will be semi-permanent, you’ll want to make sure that your container drains well. If your planter doesn’t have a drainage hole, get out your handy-dandy drill and drill a few holes in the bottom.

You may want to recycle an old Easter basket or gift container you got a gift in prior. You may find something but not like the color anymore! That’s when a paintbrush and chalk paint comes in handy. It’s easy to use and easy to clean up.

If you don’t have a collection of has-beens, drop by the local resale store and rummage through their cast-aways. You’re sure to find the perfect container.

Create Groupings
Once you have your containers, clean them up, paint them and let them dry. Next, assemble your plants and accessories. Do small groupings to see what you like best. Place the plants (in the grower pot) in your chosen container just to see how the arrangement looks before assembling. Take a picture with your phone to remember the setup. Then remove all the items. We use a screen to place over the container’s bottom to help hold the soil, so it doesn’t drip through and clog the drainage holes.

Next, select the correct potting soil for the plants you assemble. At this point, you can either keep the plants in the grower pot and set them in the container and cover them with craft moss or pot them straight into the decorative container. It’s up to you. If it is a temporary selection, then the grower pot assembly may be the easiest way to go. We use a cactus and succulent mix with a little well-draining potting mix together for these plants.

Plant and Assemble

You will want to build the soil up a bit before placing the plants. Remember to leave the soil line below the top of the container about 1/2-1 inch so there won’t be water spillover. If using it temporarily, you can keep the plant in the grower pot and place them on the soil. If you’re using it as a more permanent collection, remove the grower pot and place the plant where you want it in the assembly. As you go, fill in around each plant, tucking soil in between each one so the roots are covered and secure.

Do the rest the same way. If needed, make a funnel out of a plastic container or poster board and feed the soil through it to get to the tight spots where your hands don’t fit. Tamp down the soil with your fingers or a spoon. Be careful not to bury the top of the stems in soil but just up to your plant’s soil line. You can add a top dressing of time-release fertilizer or use a balanced liquid fertilizer when watering. Once it all is assembled, use a clean paintbrush to brush any excess soil on the leaves. Then check the soil moisture around each plant and water as needed. Next, top dress with craft moss or colored rocks.

Then slide in your accessories to make it festive!

Mix Nature In
Another fun way to decorate around the house is to use the nature items you might have picked up outside. Bark, twigs, and moss can be a part of the next project. Inspect the items for ants, bugs, or the like before assembly and remove them.

Keep your plant inside its grower pot. Use a hot glue gun to glue the pieces around the grower pot and assemble them in an organic arrangement.

Finish it off with some twine or raffia. Set these on a side table or in a collection together. Or you can use them at each place setting as a take-home gift for your guests.

Now, once you’ve got your decorations finished, snap a photo and share it with us on Instagram or Facebook! We’d love to see your plant creations! Tag us with #LivelyRoot and share the love!

Extra bonus:
Use your children’s leftover Easter baskets to repurpose into a summer arrangement by following the same instructions as above. We didn’t plant them in the soil this time but left them in the grower pots and tucked moss around the containers. When it’s time to water, just disassemble, water, let drain, and then place back into the basket. We included a clear plastic saucer to protect the basket in case of leftover dripping

About Lively Root

At Lively Root, the green spaces created have been instrumental in development as horticulturists, for an ideal green space. Lively Root’s plants are home-grown and full-scale fulfillment centers. They only sell eco-friendly products that are packaged and delivered right to your doorstep. Founding members have over a century of horticultural experience as growers, retailers, and landscapers, ranging from small plants to indoor plants, outdoor plants, large trees, and flowering shrubs. They have planted & maintained trees on residential and commercial properties. Plants improve health by purifying the air, soothing stress, making people feel happier, and offering style and ambiance. 

Yoga illustration for 360 Magazine

The Roots Between Yoga and Plants

Yoga is a way for humans to connect with nature, and plants play a pivotal role in that. Plants increase mood, they can help heal the body, and some plants can also clean the air, which can make a pretty big difference in how people feel as they practice yoga. According to Adam Husler, one of the UK’s most sought after yoga instructors, having a green, plant-filled space adds multiple benefits to your yoga practice. As Adam states it, plants bring four major attributes to one’s yoga practice: Air purity, Form and Structure, Mood lifting, and Meditation Anchors.

Air Purity

Breathing is the foundation of yoga, which allows plants to play a huge role as they purify the air. Living plants are natural air purifiers, removing carbon dioxide from the air and producing oxygen during the day. There’s nothing like an oxygen-producing plant to bring life, and fresh air, to an indoor room. This offers a healthy environment for your practice, and allows you to intake the good stuff and less of the bad.

Form and Structure

Yoga is about form, self-enquiry and exploring various shapes and poses. For the ultimate balance, this should also be reflected in your space through combining yin and yang, masculine and feminine colors and shapes. Plants with interesting structure amongst robust leafy plants can help balance the look and feel of your space and improve your practice.

Mood Lifting

Did you know that different plants have almost instantaneous effects on your mood? Creating a green space sanctuary can really lift your mood. Mixing plants and positioning plants in various locations instantly creates an urban-jungle vibe, which encourages a sense of calm and happiness. Some of these include Aloe vera, Ferns, and Lavender (for direct light areas inside). According to a study published in the “Journal of Environmental Psychology,” people reported higher levels of mood and perceived comfort when plants were present than when they were not.

Meditation Anchors

Plants are soothing and add to one’s calmness. The foliage from plants make for great meditation anchors – their leaves are intricate and hypnotic to look at, you can easily get lost in them. And how about a little fragrance! Adding a little fragrance to meditation has a very powerful, positive and supportive effect on any type of meditation and becomes a way of helping our mind to become focused, clear, balanced and peaceful.

Lively Root recommends the following plants for your yoga studio:
White Bird Dragon Tree (Dracaena warneckii ‘White Stripe’)
Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum Wallisii)
Spider Plant (Chlorophytum Comosum)
Variegated Snake Plants (Sansevieria Trifasciata ‘Laurentii’)
ZZ Plant/Eternity Plant (Zamioculcas Zamiifolia)
Croton (Codiaeum variegatum ‘Petra’)
Peacock Plant (Calathea roseopicta ‘Medallion’)
Bromeliad

Perhaps the most low maintenance plants on our list are the ZZ Plant & the Snake Plant. They can grow in almost any location regardless of the lighting conditions. These plants, like the peace lily, have been shown to filter harsh toxins from the air including formaldehyde, toluene and benzene. As we said earlier, there’s nothing like oxygen-producing plants to bring life, and fresh air, to an indoor room.

For more information, please visit Lively Root’s website.

More about Lively Root
At Lively Root, the green spaces created have been instrumental in developing an ideal green space. Lively Root’s plants are home grown and full-scale fulfillment centers. They only sell eco-friendly products that are packaged and delivered right to your doorstep. Founding members have over a century of horticultural experience as growers, retailers, and landscapers, ranging from small plants, to indoor plants, outdoor plants, large trees, and flowering shrubs. They have planted & maintained trees on residential and commercial properties. Plants improve health by purifying the air, soothing stress, making people feel happier, and offering style and ambiance.

Plants by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Feng Shui Plant Positioning

There are good and bad feng shui plants and positioning arrangements. It’s all about how you position plants in specific areas of your living room, bedroom or other areas of your home. As feng shui has a lot to do with the overall “feeling” of a space, it is important to find plants that fit comfortably in your space and are not cramped or too small for the area. Healthy, robust plants are a must!

What is Bagua and why is it important?

Bagua is one of the main tools used in feng shui. It is an eight sided  ‘energy map’ used to evaluate the energy of the green space in your home. Each of the eight sections and the center correspond with different life experiences: career, wisdom/knowledge, finances, family, fame, relationships, children/creativity, supportive people, and health. Plants can be used to connect these eight sides of the map and create harmony and well-being in an area.

Good feng shui plants
This includes plants that are known to cleanse the air and have a strong presence. Some of these include Philodendron, Areca Palms, Ferns, Jade, Money Tree and Mother in Law Tongue. Of course, there cannot be positive energy in a home or office without clean, good quality air, which makes this aspect of the plant very important. Appearances also play an important role, as it is important to have a strong, healthy plant that radiates a strong energy. Struggling plants may not offer these qualities so keep your plants healthy and pair them with visually pleasing pots as they can offer vibrancy and joyful energy.

Bad feng shui plants

These are generally considered plants whose shape can bring undesired energy. Cactus is a classic example of a so-called bad feng shui plant because its energy is very “spiky.” In addition, the Snake Plant could be considered bad feng shui because of their lengthy pointed leaves. However, the Snake Plant has strong protective energies to specific areas of your home and is considered helpful.

Positioning of Feng Shui Plants
East, Southeast, and South bagua areas are excellent feng shui areas to decorate with plants. Be sure to experiment with the best placement of plants in your living room, bedroom, or other areas of your home, and keep them healthy! This will create an environment where plants will become a harmonious part of your decor and create excellent feng shui in your green space.

Money Tree Brings Fortune and Luck
One of the most common feng shui plants is the money tree. Appropriately named, as it is believed to encourage prosperity and good luck. Some feng shui experts say these plants also reduce stress and anxiety, and can even help prevent arguments and sleeping disorders. This bonsai style tree, with braided trunks, brings the best fortune when placed in the areas concerning money (office), health (kitchen), or fame (entry-ways). With all of these benefits, no wonder they make great housewarming and new business gifts!

Peace Lily Purifies the Air
Peace Lilies make excellent houseplants for your home or office green space. They not only brighten up a living space, but are also excellent at cleaning the air of rooms they are in. They grow well in spaces with low light (although they bloom in areas with more light). They have a wonderful white bloom with lush foliage, and with their air purifying qualities, placement in an office area can help improve air conditions and correct energetic imbalances.

More about Lively Root
At Lively Root, the green spaces created have been instrumental in development as horticulturists, for an ideal green space. Lively Root’s plants are home-grown and full-scale fulfillment centers. They only sell eco-friendly products that are packaged and delivered right to your doorstep. Founding members have over a century of horticultural experience as growers, retailers, and landscapers, ranging from small plants, to indoor plants, outdoor plants, large trees, and flowering shrubs. They have planted & maintained trees on residential and commercial properties. Plants improve health by purifying the air, soothing stress, making people feel happier, and offering style and ambiance. For more information, please visit Lively Root’s website.