Posts tagged with "surgeon"

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Dental Health Article for 360 MAGAZINE

COVID Stress x Teeth

By Justin Lyons

Coronavirus obviously affects all-around health, but it’s also taking a toll on mental health.

With a pandemic, a recession, social injustice and a majorly impactful presidential election coming in just over a month, who isn’t stressed and tense?

Dr. Cathy Hung says headaches, jaw pain or severe discomfort near the ears can all be connected to TMJ disorders. These symptoms can be brought upon by stress and tension at a time during which either of those would be easily forgiven, if not already expected.

TMJ, or the temporomandibular joint, is the joint connecting the jaw to the skull. There is one on each side of the head, and they’re used extensively for everything we open our jaws for. They’re incredibly important, but that importance can make them severe sources of pain when something goes wrong.

Hung, oral surgeon and author of Pulling Wisdom: Filling Gaps of Cross-Cultural Communication for Healthcare Providers, said there are many causes of TMJ disorders, but stress is one of the biggest.

“I have seen patients with TMJ due to stress from the pandemic. When people are tense, they often clench or grind their teeth, tightening their jaw muscles and putting stress on the TM joints. Sometimes severe clenching also can lead to a cracked tooth or cracked dental crown,” Hung said.

She also offers some tips for those with TMJ disorder-causing habits.

Teeth grinding: Known as bruxism, this can be grinding, gnashing or clenching of teeth. Hung said these can all happen unconsciously while awake or even while asleep. Grinding can lead to TMJ, headaches and damage to teeth, and the best treatments are stress relievers or doctor-prescribed relaxants. Dentists and oral surgeons can also fit teeth grinders for a protective mouthpiece to wear while sleeping.

Tension headaches: Hung said tension headaches feel like a band wrapped around the temples. These can come from clenching, but they can also be associated with pain in the jaw. Hung says over-the-counter medication can help, but it isn’t fail-proof. If they don’t work, you should schedule a visit with a medical professional.

Other TMJ symptoms: Hung says there are a few ways to tell if a person is suffering from a TMJ disorder.

“You may have a misaligned bite, or pain and a clicking or grating noise when you open your mouth,” Hung said. “Or, you may have trouble opening your mouth wide.”

Again, stress relief and mouth guards can help in these scenarios. Physical therapy can also help. Hung says surgery can be needed in the most severe cases.

It’s a stressful time in the world, but Hung offers some hope to those who have acquired TMJ disorders through stress.

“Certainly, treatment can take time to be effective,” Hung said. “But you’ll be glad to know that problems associated with TMJ disorder are more easily diagnosed and treated than they were in the past.”

For more information or to contact Dr. Cathy Hung, you can click right here.

Cash and wallet illustration for 360 Magazine

Women Surgeons Earn NIH Funding

Women are underrepresented in the field of academic surgery, but women surgeons are earning a disproportionate share of research grants from the National Institutes of Health, a new study has found.

Women make up 19% of surgery faculty at academic health systems but held 26.4% of prestigious “R01” grants in place at surgery departments as of October 2018, the researchers found.

“Female surgeon-scientists are underrepresented within academic surgery, but hold a greater than anticipated proportion of NIH funding,” said researcher Shayna L. Showalter, MD, a breast surgical oncologist at UVA Health and the UVA Cancer Center. “This means that female surgeon-scientists are a crucial component of future surgical research.”

Women in Surgery

Showalter and colleagues queried the number of grants from surgery departments throughout the country to determine the percentage of R01 grants held by women. They identified 212 grants held by 159 principal investigators. Of those 159 investigators, 42 were women, holding a total of 49 R01 grants. “Female surgeon scientists are doing impressive work and have been able to succeed in a very competitive research environment,” Showalter said.

Diving deeper, the researchers determined that women were more likely than men to be first-time grant recipients. More than 73% of women were first-time recipients, compared with 54.8% of men. “Within the research community, we are potentially moving away from the tradition of awarding funding to longstanding, proven researchers,” Showalter said. “Females in this study were twice as likely to be first-time grant recipients. I hope that the focus continues to be on awarding funding to a diverse group of surgeon-scientists.”

Women who held R01 grants were more likely to be part of a department with a female chair or that is more than 30 percent female, the researchers determined. They also found that women had fewer research articles published in scientific journals than did their male colleagues. “This finding may be related to the number of first-time grants and is consistent with previous studies that have demonstrated that women in academic surgery have fewer publication in general than men,” Showalter said.

The researchers encouraged surgery departments to nurture and promote female faculty, and to advocate for women in leadership positions. Strong mentorship programs are important, Showalter said.

“Currently, there are a number of accomplished female surgeon-scientists, and I am confident that many more will play crucial roles in the future of surgical research,” she said. “As a community within academia, we need to support and promote a diverse faculty.”

Findings Published

The researchers have published their findings online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. The research team consisted of Elizabeth D. Krebs, Adishesh K. Narahari, Ian O. Cook-Armstrong, Anirudha S. Chandrabhatla, J. Hunter Mehaffey, Gilbert R. Upchurch Jr. and Showalter.

To keep up with the latest medical research news from UVA, subscribe to the Making of Medicine blog here.

Mina Tocalini illustration for 360 MAGAZINE HEALTH SECTION.

Coronavirus Conundrums: Where do we go from here?

The following interview is courtesy of Special Guests.

We are faced with lots of new questions as the COVID pandemic continues: Back to school? Wear a mask? Virus Mutations? Cases Skyrocketing? Our guest is Dr. Charles Page, a surgeon from Texas who is here to help us make sense of what appears to be so nonsensical.

Q&A:

1) Dr. Page, can you give us a big picture of where we are in the pandemic?

Answer: The wave is progressing from the epicenter (NYC) out into the rest of the US. In my opinion, this is not a Second Wave or a mutated virus but a progression of the same virus.

2) The number of coronavirus cases is skyrocketing, primarily because of increased testing availability. How does the death toll correlate to this increase in cases?

Answer: Fortunately, the death toll hasn’t followed that pattern. The death rate is stable. That’s good news. At the present our ICU’s and hospitals(at least in Texas) are not overwhelmed with cases. No need for panic.

3) What about a vaccine?

Answer: We are still getting closer to a vaccine. The NIH started enrollment for people to receive vaccines in clinical studies (as of 7/8/20).

The COVPN (Covid Prevention Trials Network). Bringing together these four groups to begin phase 3 clinical trials will streamline the process for a vaccine.

4) Can you give us your opinion on the safety of reopening schools in the fall?

Answer: We have to base our opinions on facts—not feelings (or politics). There are several international studies that show it is safe for kids to return to school. Studies in Iceland, China and New Zealand showed that: children are particularly resilient to the disease (they have minimal symptoms) and for some reason, they rarely transmit COVID to others. This has been corroborated by multiple studies.

5) So, what’s the issue?

Answer: Kid’s immune systems are more resilient than those of adults. Their systems are in the phase of processing and developing immunity to new pathogens. Isolation/quarantine may, in the long run, be more harmful. I feel comfortable having my 12 and 18-year-old kids go back to school —without a mask.

6) What do you think about masks?

Answer: There’s not a lot of science behind wearing a mask. We are still in uncharted waters. Most of the studies done are in hospitals and health care institutions. With that being said, in many states (like Texas) it’s the law. Our states haven’t flip-flopped. If you recall, at the onset of the pandemic, we were short on resources and didn’t have enough masks. Now we do. The literature confirms that masks catch many respiratory droplets, keeping them from spreading in the air. So if someone has disease, it diminishes the spread. But wearing a mask doesn’t keep you from getting the disease.

About Dr. Charles Page

Dr. Page is the best guy to see on the worst day of your life. He is a surgeon from Texas and co-host of the podcast, “Life’s about Living,” a show for retirees and Boomers.

His book, A Spoonful of Courage for the Sick and Suffering, is a compilation of faith-based inspirational stories helping the ill see the possibilities in their problems.

Visit his website HERE.

POLISHED FOR MEN

By Andrew Carey Irving

Step 1: Daily Micro-Scrub

Exfoliants I’ve used in the past have either been like sandpaper, or the opposite, where I can barely feel any results. This is just right. It doesn’t feel too rough, but you can tell it’s getting rid of that dead layer of skin. Smells good too!


Step 02: Dual Cleanse & Shave

I’m a minimalist, so I love anything that does double duty like this. It’s a thicker cream, so it takes getting used to when using it as a cleanser. But it’s great to be able to wash your face and then shave at the same time!


Step 03: Oil Free Moisturizer

This is also pretty thick, and you can see the coverage before it blends into the skin, which is great to know your whole face is protected. After it absorbed into my skin, my face felt soft and seemed to be glowing. In fact, after I did this video, someone came to the door, and they commented how refreshed I looked!

PolishedByDrLancer.com

https://the360mag.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/POLISHED_ANDREW.mov

Ladylike’s Kristin Chirico Gets Photoshopped

Check out the new episode of Ladylike starring Kristin Chirico who explores today’s beauty standards. In a simulation of what it would be like to go under the knife, Chirico ventures into Beverly Hills with the finest of plastic surgeons Dr. Harrison Lee, Dr. Linda Li and Dr. David Amron (as seen on TMZ, Cosmopolitan, CNN and more) to understand what it takes to become “society’s model.” The surgeons recommended a battery of procedures including liposuction, jaw and cheek contouring, restylane injections, nose narrowing, bone retractions, bone cement inserts, genioplasty and more. 
Kristin explores self-identity issues all have struggled with in one way or another. The results will surprise you. The full episode is live now on Ladylike’s YouTube Channel

Highlights from this episode:

Patients don’t come in with (pictures of) celebrity faces, but they do come in with faces of people from Instagram, from social networks they had just found that they happened to like. And I explain to them that these pictures aren’t real, they’re all photoshopped.” – Dr. Linda Li, Certified American Board of Plastic Surgery Practitioner

“Being in a plastic surgeon’s office and having them tell you all the things about your face that you’ve lived with your entire life that really need to be fixed… to view you as beautiful enough to be model is a lot. It’s a lot emotionally to do it once, and I did it three times” – Kristin Chirico

About “Ladylike”: BuzzFeed’s Ladylike is an all female team that writes, edits, produces, and stars in video content created for women by women. In their work, the group covers the struggles and triumphs associated with being a woman, experimenting with everything from free bleeding to contouring, from breast exams to hair removal, plus fashion and beauty trends, photoshopping, and more! Ladylike strives to empower women through content that explores all facets of womanhood.