Posts tagged with "plant based diet"

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Fitness

Understanding Physical Limitations

Five Things Non-Disabled People Should Understand About Those With Physical Limitations

By: Julie Morin, Co-Founder, Envol

Chronic illness has continued to grow in the past decades with six in ten Americans living with at least one chronic disease today, according to the CDC.

Having at least one chronic symptom is considered normal in the modern world of today – and let me tell you, that’s a scary realization. Such symptoms can look and feel different for everyone, ranging from mild occasional discomfort to being physically limited in our ability to participate to everyday activities.

Yet non-disabled people dominate the population and culture in the US, which means our understanding of normal is wholly based around the perimeters for non-disabled ideas and activities.

This is something I know all too well. Two weeks after taking ciprofloxacin – a commonly prescribed antibiotic – for a UTI, I was practicing yoga and, out of nowhere, my leg muscles went into painful paralysis. I couldn’t walk or even move my legs anymore. I had to call for help – it was terrifying – and I was rushed to the hospital in the neurology department. All the tests came back negative, and no one knew what was wrong with me. After two weeks, they said it was probably all just in my head and sent me home.

I spent the next four years in a wheelchair, and after multiple misdiagnoses and unsuccessful medical treatments, I turned to holistic healing. I began working with a French naturopathic physician who informed me that my symptoms aligned with fluoroquinolone toxicity, which is currently not recognized as a diagnosis yet. Still, many cases of fluoroquinolone-associated disability are being reported, and doctors continue to prescribe them today despite the FDA advising against it.

Under the guidance of my naturopathic physician, I created a wellness routine that incorporated a healthy, plant-based diet, meditation, therapeutic movement, rest, and gratitude, and I am now 75% healed and can walk short distances again.

Going from a healthy, vibrant young lady to a handicapped 25 years old just by taking a few pills has not been easy. But what was even harder was how people treated me during this time.

And what I learned during this time is knowledge I feel is essential to share with others:

  • Illness isn’t always visible.

It’s always wise to be careful with assumptions and presuming someone is healthy just because they don’t look sick. There is a lot that can be invisible to the eye and coming from a place of empathy when we simply don’t know enough about a situation or a person, is always a good idea.

  • Dare to talk about it.

Avoiding complex topics because they might be awkward or uncomfortable can make a person living with a chronic illness feel even more lonely and unheard. Talk about what they’re going through, the struggles, the hardship, but also the joy and the little things that they feel grateful for.

  • Not having a diagnosis doesn’t mean nothing is wrong.

So many people go mis- or undiagnosed by the medical profession and many assume that it must mean that there is nothing wrong with them and that they should simply resume their life. Yet the daily struggles and limitations are still there, and they can be very real. Continuing to offer your support and trust even when a clear diagnosis isn’t identified is one of the best way you can support someone you love who is going through a difficult time with their health. This type of support can greatly contribute to our recovery.

  • Avoid suggesting that someone is lucky that they can’t work.

Being unable to work isn’t a privilege – it’s a consequence of chronic illness or physical limitations. Rather, helping that person find their mission and a passion in which they can contribute to the world can often shift their perspective and help them boost their self-esteem.

  • People with physical limitations of disabilities are reminded every day of how life is different for them.

Be the person who finds and enhances similarities and makes them feel like they belong to the same group as healthy and non-disabled people. Invite them to parties, include them in group conversations, activities, etc. In the end, our cells listen to every one of our thoughts and so why not see life as everybody else should: full of possibilities, feeling confident, strong, and powerful beings.

And let’s not forget the power of love and positivity and the positive effects they can have on our health & well-being.

Being in a state of love and gratitude is in fact so important that it is a nourishment in the healing app Envol that my partner and I have created after my recovery.

Envol app is a holistic healing tool with a unique health-score tracking concept + algorithm, backed by science and doctors, that combines all the necessary tools to improve health no matter where people start–whether they’re recovering from a chronic illness or need some extra guidance when dealing with stress or anxiety.

I hope that people never stop believing in the incredible powers of their body. We are more powerful than we think. There is pure magic in us, and if we create the right conditions in our life to let that magic express itself, miracles can happen. Our cells respond to each of our thoughts and beliefs – and it starts with changing ‘I can’t’ into ‘I can.’

About The Author

As someone who’s spent years battling chronic illness, Julie Morin, co-founder of Envol, knows how difficult and pricey it can be to get our health back. She started to wonder about what would happen to our bodies should we give them the opportunity to heal from within. Julie explored that question and when she started walking again after 4 years in a wheelchair, Envol was born: an easy-to-use mobile app to guide and empower people to take control of their health and start feeling better.

Bernardus menu item illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lucia Restaurant & Bar New Menu

LUCIA RESTAURANT & BAR CELEBRATES SUMMER WITH A PLANT-BASED BASH

NEW COLORS OF THE SEASON MENU FOCUSED ON GREEN, GORGEOUS & GASTRONOMIC

America’s love affair with the garden has exploded with 9.7 million people now fully immersed in a plant-based diet. In fact, 2021 is projected to be THE year this diet finally goes mainstream. From plant-based beverages to meatless burgers, this trend has no signs of slowing given the benefits to both one’s body and the environment. Riding this wave, chef Cal Stamenov is culling beets, chard, asparagus and fresh fava from the Lodge’s two-acre organic garden to debut the new Colors of the Season menu. Served in addition to the la carte and five-course tasting menu, Colors of the Season is available June 1 through July 31, 2021; prices range from $16 to $36.

NATURE’S BOUNTY

Crafting vegetable-driven dishes requires equal parts timing and finesse. Picked at their peak, kale, sweet peas, chard and fresh fava share short lifespans. Coaxing their distinct flavors while marrying ingredients into a leafy risotto, humble ratatouille or goat cheese terrine is an art. Take the elevated Red Striped Beet Spring Roll, a visual stunner with pops of cilantro, olives and creamy avocado, balancing texture and flavor for a full palate immersion. Purple Cauliflower Soup, blending purple basil and purple radish with fresh black beets puts a colorful spin on comfort food.

Other starters include lip-smacking Local Asparagus, steamed with saffron couscous, curly purple mustard and a passionfruit emulsion. The Backdoor Avocado Salad, spotlighting fruit culled from nearby Salinas Valley, delivers a mélange of quinoa, heirloom tomatoes, fennel and fresh basil lightly dressed in Meyer lemon-olive oil with a dusting of Big Sur Sea salt. There is also a spin on crudité, with the Colorful Pickled Veggies Around and an ethereal Beautiful Strawberries, pairing arugula, lemon confit and aged balsamic with a dollop of fluffy Italian burrata.

Green Gazpacho makes a showing on the new menu, with a deft blend of celery, cilantro, avocado and piquant Padron peppers. The Leafy Green Risotto, focused on kale, Swiss chard, spinach, chervil and fresh fava is a flavor explosion, as is the Portobello Wellington, stuffed with zucchini, kale, goat cheese and pine nuts with a rich butternut squash sauce. Corn hounds will love the Agnolotti Pasta, prepared with fresh yellow corn, just-picked sweet peas and shave or two of Australian black winter truffles. Rounding out the menu is a Stuffed Rainbow Chard, easy on both the eyes and palate, pairing green lentils du puy, zucchini, brown rice and goat cheese.

SOURCING SUPERFOODS

The switch to a plant-based diet is not a fad. According to Gallup, 77 percent of Americans have reduced their meat consumption in the past 12 months, with almost six in 10 Americans reporting transitioning to a more flexitarian or semi-vegetarian diet. This bodes well for chefs who have long refined their craft in this category.

There is no shortage of benefits for those who aligned with a vegetable-forward diet. According to Everyday Health, the nine scientific benefits from following this menu regimen include lower blood pressure, reduction in cardiovascular disease, weight loss, reduction in Type 2 diabetes, stroke and risk of cancer, and issues surrounding cholesterol. Living longer is another key benefit. The Journal of the American Heart Association study found that a plant-based diet lowers the risk of all causes of mortality by 25 percent. Finally, the noted benefits to the brain, largely due to polyphenols which are known to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline. Simply stated, the world is your (mushroom) oyster!

LUCIA RESTAURANT & BAR

Set in secluded Carmel Valley on 28 acres of sweeping lavender, grapevines and olive orchards, Lucia Restaurant & Bar has long set the standard for luxury dining along the California coast. Named after the majestic Santa Lucia Mountains which provide the dramatic backdrop to the 2,300 sq., ft., alfresco terrace, the contemporary 90-seat dining room is set in rich white Italian leather paired with rustic treatments crafted in marble, oxidized copper, teak and reclaimed wood. French wooden floors, chandeliers and stunning exterior fireplaces grace the mixed-use table layout with a focal point fireplace styled from Bagattini Oregon stone marking the main entrance. Paired with Stamenov’s light touch and artisanal integrity, the restaurant underscores the authentic relationship between food and terroir.

Classically trained with an eye to sustainability, Stamenov’s light touch and artisanal integrity are evident in every offering. Wielding an impressive resume working under the ardent eye of such culinary greats as Pierre Gagnaire, Michel Richard, Alain Ducasse, Eric Ripert and the legendary Masa Kobayashi, his California country cuisine plays off locally sourced product with the essence of the dish taking center stage. Subtle reductions and thoughtful flavor marriages are his mantra, paired with a back pocket of local farmers and foragers keeping Lucia’s kitchen at a steady simmer.

Culling from the Lodge’s two-acre backdoor organic garden and a private cache of 150+ fruit trees, heirloom vegetables, 180,000 Italian honeybees and resident Plymouth, Barred Rock, Rhode Island, Speckled Sussex and Ameraucana chickens, Stamenov’s seasonal spotlight menu is certain to please.

Colors of the Season:

Red Striped Beet Spring Rolls | cilantro, avocado, olives, spicy hummus | $16

Herb Goat Cheese Terrine | beets, carrots, celery root remoulade | $16

Beautiful Strawberries | italian burrata, arugula, lemon confit, aged balsamic | $18

Colorful Pickled Veggies Around | leeks vinaigrette, parmesan toast, garden herbs | $17

Local Asparagus | steamed, passionfruit emulsion, saffron couscous, curly purple mustard | $18

Swank Farm Purple Cauliflower Soup | purple basil, purple radish | $12

Backdoor Avocado Salad | quinoa, heirloom tomatoes, fennel, fresh-picked basil, olive oil, big sur sea salt, meyer lemon| $18

Australian Winter Black Truffle Risotto | carnaroli rice, glazed spring vegetables, chervil| $36

Baked Ratatouille | marble potatoes, rosemary, fresh spaghetti, olives | $32

Agnolotti Pasta | yellow corn, australian black winter truffles, sweet peas | $36

Stuffed Rainbow Chard | green lentils du puy, brown rice, zucchini, goat cheese | $34

Green Gazpacho | avocado, celery, cilantro, peppers, leafy greens, lime | $14

Leafy Green Risotto | kale, asparagus, chard, spinach, parmesan, fresh fava, parsley, chervil| $27

Portobello Wellington | kale, swiss chard, zucchini, goat cheese, pine nuts, butternut squash sauce | $36

Wild Mushroom | brown rice with roasted garlic, black truffle potatoes, parmesan, arugula | $32

Fresh Raspberry Vacherin | raspberry sorbet, baked lavender meringue | $14

Blenheim Apricot Tart | almonds, lavender-honey ice cream | $14

Christine’s Organic Strawberries | lemon verbena ice cream, sauternes granite| $14

A variety of coveted private dining venues from the casual Cooper’s Den to the 12-seat private Wine Cellar, exclusive five-seat Chef’s Table and 16-seat Magnum Room offer extensive tasting menus backed by an impressive 25,000-bottle wine cellar. Light dining is also available in Lucia Bar and patio.

vegetables by Nicole salazar for 360 magazine

Show your heart some love on more than just Valentine’s Day 

By Nutrition Myth Buster Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS

Experts aren’t sure why people are more likely to have a heart attack during the winter than any other time of year. If Valentine’s Day and Heart Health Month are inspiring you to take better care of your ticker, here’s big news. 

A 12-month human clinical study involving 577 participants conducted in Malaysia reveals we aren’t doing our hearts any favors by eating a high-carb diet. Researchers looked at different patterns of eating, from high-fat to low-fat, high-carb to low-carb, and measured the effect each way of eating had on the risk for heart disease. Turns out, fat intake didn’t move the risk needle one way or the other. The higher carb diets, on the other hand, were associated with greater cardiovascular ris. 

I wasn’t the least surprised by this study’s findings! I’ve been saying for years that fat has been wrongly demonized. If anything, it’s sugar – not fat – that’s causing us to go off the metabolic rails. In this study, low-carb diets performed considerably better than high-carb diets.

The study found that healthy adults who ate higher proportions of carbohydrates (compared with the amount of proteins or fat they consumed) tended to develop several elevated risk factors for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and more plaque-promoting small LDL cholesterol particles. Higher proportions of dietary fat intake were not associated with elevating these risk factors.

A hormone called insulin – and a condition called insulin resistance – are at the core of pre-diabetes, and are turning out to be early warning signs for heart disease. And the results of this study showed that insulin measures were considerably better when people ate diets with a lower amount of carbs, and that was true regardless of the amount of fat consumed. 

It’s insulin resistance, not cholesterol, that is the root cause of heart disease and, according to other research, probably many other chronic underlying conditions plaguing our world. 

The good news is that insulin resistance is treatable, preventable and mostly reversible by diet alone. It’s time we get off the toxic diets that are causing this condition in the first place! It’s time we understand that saturated fat and cholesterol are not the problems. When you remove that outdated thinking, the current dietary guidelines collapse like a house of cards. 

What’s good for the heart is good for the brain, and vice versa. I haven’t found one exception to that case. The right diet for the heart looks exactly like the right diet for the brain. And sadly, the  diet we SHOULD be eating is exactly the opposite of the diet we’ve been told is heart-healthy. 

Easy, no-fail heart-healthy eating changes

Most attempts to eat healthier fail quickly because the changes are too big and unmanageable. Instead of trying to completely overhaul your diet, start by making a few small changes. Here are a few simple suggestions that may have a healthy impact on your heart: 

First, remove these items from your kitchen: 

  • Corn oil and canola oil. These seed oils are filled with omega-6 which is very pro-inflammatory. 
  • Sugar. Let’s be realistic. I know you’re probably not going to give up your favorite sweets entirely. But be kind to your heart by restricting those goodies to just a few days a month.
  • Canned soups, salad dressings and pasta sauces. These are often loaded with hidden sugars and a ton of sodium. Instead of relying on these cooking shortcuts, do an internet search for simple recipes you can make from scratch.  
  • White flour and white rice. These are heavily processed and raise your blood sugar almost as much as pure sugar. And – don’t shoot the messenger – products made with ‘whole grains” don’t do much better. Whole grains still raise blood sugar, and still contain gluten, so they may not be the solution for everyone. 

Then, add these items to your fridge and pantry: 

  • Palm oil. You can find this online and in specialty markets. Millions of people around the world use it as their everyday cooking oil. Malaysian certified sustainable palm oil is rich in nutrients such as brain- and heart-healthy vitamin E tocotrienols. 
  • Butter. This was never bad to begin with! It was banished from our tables because of our ill-advised fear of saturated fats. So we replaced it with something much worse!
  • Stevia and monk fruit. These are natural sweeteners that have no effect on your blood sugar.” 
  • Nuts: People who eat more nuts have lower BMIs. Their diets are higher in magnesium, higher in fiber, higher in poly- and monounsaturated fats, all of which can have a profound effect on your health. But nuts are also easy to overeat and contribute to weight gain, so just be careful about the amount you consume.
  • Egg yolks: What a relief that you don’t have to suffer through one more tasteless egg white omelet! The advice to eat egg white omelets is way past its expiration date! 
  • Dark chocolate (minimum 60% cocoa on the label): Chocolate contains cocoa flavanols; beneficial plant-based phytonutrients that support cardiovascular health.
  • Grass-fed beef. Grass-fed beef contains anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids and less inflammatory omega-6s. It’s also free of hormones, a very big plus indeed. If you follow this suggestion, you’ll never have to worry about how much marbling is in your steak, or if your hamburger is 70/30 instead of 90/10 or 80/20. It won’t matter. 
  • Dark meat poultry: The USDA data shows that there are mere milligrams of differences in the nutritional content of white and dark meat. 

Here’s more advice: Stick with the basics. I’ve always said that the only rule you really need to follow in nutrition is to eat real food, food your great-grandmother would have recognized as food. Eat from what I call the “Jonny Bowden Four Food Groups”: food you could hunt, fish, gather or pluck. Stay away from overly processed and get back to basics. 

That doesn’t mean you can never snack. Get organic (non-GMO) popcorn with minimal chemical processing. Get away from that chemical soup called “butter flavoring” and look for a microwave popcorn that contains palm oil, because palm oil doesn’t burn easily so your popcorn will taste better.  

This year, you can finally make commitments to a heart-healthy diet that are easy to achieve. These tips will help you take better care of your heart throughout the winter and may become heart-healthy habits you’ll want to follow all year long.  

Biography: Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS

Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, (aka “The Nutrition Myth Buster”) is a nationally known expert on weight loss, nutrition and health, and the best-selling author of 15 books on health. Dr. Jonny — a former professional pianist and conductor — earned six certifications in personal training and fitness, has a Master’s degree in psychology, a PhD in holistic nutrition and is board certified by the American College of Nutrition. He has written, contributed to or consulted on hundreds of articles in publications as diverse as the New York Times, People, Us, O the Oprah Magazine, In Style, Vanity Fair Online, People, GQ, Forbes Online, Clean Eating, the Huffington Post and countless others.

He is the best-selling author of 15 books, including “Living Low Carb”, “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth” and his latest, the revised and expanded version of “The Great Cholesterol Myth” (2020).