Posts tagged with "History.com"

1923 Prohibiton Bar via The Vox Agency for use by 360 Magazine

1923 Prohibition Bar Celebrates National Bourbon Day

1923 Prohibition Bar at Mandalay Bay, open seven days a week, announces National Bourbon Day specials on Monday, June 14 with 15% off their house bourbon flight available at the bar top with tasting notes. The bourbon flight is regularly priced at $32 and includes a sampling of today’s most popular bourbons including Buffalo Trace, Bulleit, Angel’s Envy and Angel’s Envy Rye.

The new, Prohibition-themed 1923 Prohibition Bar, is a private, hidden, modern speakeasy, serving bourbon spirits and signature barrel-aged specialty cocktails. The elegant venue also hosts live burlesque shows, live rock band karaoke and bourbon education and tasting classes.

Prohibition

For those of you who don’t know what prohibition and speakeasies are, Prohibition started in 1920 with the Volstead Act and was essentially a piece of legislation that outlawed drinking within the US, and was created as a result of the Christian Temperance movement that started with what we consider to be the first wave of feminism in the 1820s-1930s, as women wanted to, among other things, prevent spousal abuse that would occur as a result of drinking. Needless to say, the act was hard to enforce and people began distributing liquor illegally, known as “bootlegging,” and people would go to illegal bars, known as “speakeasies.” Gangs rose in popularity during this time, such as Al Capone, as a result of bootlegging. The act was officially repealed in 1933.

National Bourbon Day

National Bourbon Day is a day in which to celebrate America’s National Spirit, a drink created officially by Elijah Craig in the limestone shelf region, where most whisky is still made, in the 1700s. Charred barrels gave the whisky it’s iconic oaky flavor. It is still produced predominantly in America (hence the title of America’s National Spirit) and is enjoyed by many today.

Memorial Day illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

The Meaning Behind Memorial Day

THE MEANING BEHIND MEMORIAL DAY

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

“How important it is for us to recognize and celebrate our heroes and she-roes.” – Maya Angelou

Memorial Day, once referred to as Decoration Day, is an American holiday in the United States that honors military personnel along as well as mourn those that we have lost along the way. Decoration Day was for decorating graves with flowers, wreaths, and flags. Memorial Day is formerly observed on the last Monday of May each year. It is a solemn day, but it is also important to reflect upon, appreciate and be thankful for the freedom that we all get to enjoy every day in the United States of America.

Many gather with friends and family for barbeques and celebrating the beginning of summer while others visit cemeteries and memorials to remember their loved ones lost. Each year a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time on Memorial Day. It is important to remember that we are not celebrating the wars, instead we are remembering those who served and those who gave their last breath in order to ensure that the freedoms of our country would be passed on to the next generations. We remember for the price they paid for the cost of our freedom – their lives given so ours could go on.

Memorial Day was originated after the American Civil War, where the United States faced the task of burying and honoring 600,000 to 800,000 Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the bloodiest military conflict in American history. The first commemoration of Memorial Day was held in Arlington National Cemetery on May 30, 1868. On this day, both Union and Confederate soldiers were laid to rest. Over the years, cities across the United States host Memorial Day parades that involve military personnel and members of veterans’ organizations. Americans sometimes wear a red poppy in remembrance of their loved ones, which is a tradition that was born from a World War 1 poem.  

In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Memorial Day has a different meaning behind it for every American. Here at 360 Magazine, we were able to get a few opinions from veterans in the United States.

  • Kyle Skovlund: United States Air Force – Memorial Day has a different meaning for me. Growing up, my parents would travel to Brookings, South Dakota each year to put flowers on the graves of those they had lost. When my own daughter passed away, I began doing the same thing. Memorial Day, for me, is a day to reflect on those that have been lost.
  • Michael Miller: United States Air Force – Memorial Day means remembering and celebrating. Remembering the great men and women that gave their life for our great nation and celebrating the freedoms their sacrifices have given us.
  • J.M. Skovlund: United States Army  – “Memorial Day means exactly what it was intended for, to remember and honor our fallen. They went above and beyond for our country, for the soldier on their left and right, and that’s something not everyone can say.” “Go out and remember the fallen the way you see fit. Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing. If it’s having a drink in their honor, do that. If it’s going to their grave to chat, do that. Either way, remember the fallen the best way you can, don’t disgrace them.”