Posts tagged with "Flags"

H.K. Keller Auctions Announce Your Chance to Bid on Rare Autograph Collection via H.K. Keller (globenewswire) by 360 Magazine

 H.K. Keller & Rare Autograph Collection

H.K. Keller Auctions Announce Your Chance to Bid on Rare Autograph Collection

With nearly 60 years’ experience and now with their third generation of auctioneers, H.K. Keller have helped hundreds of sellers and thousands of buyers find and bid on their perfect item.

After uncovering Theodore Stillwell’s vintage and unique Rare Autograph Collection, H.K. Keller are now excited to offer this one-of-a-kind sale to the public.

Elderly Sister’s Discovery Uncovers a World of Autograph Treasures

When it was finally time to move out of their life-long family home and into a retirement facility, sisters Gloria and Nancy Stillwell of Ephrata, PA knew they couldn’t take it all with them. With the assistance of a local real estate agent, they contacted an auctioneer to help them with the transition.

While there were some things in the home with little value, a trunk in the attic caught the auctioneer’s eye. The ladies were aware of their father’s hobby, but they weren’t sure people would actually want the autographs that he had collected.

Inside the trunk were hundreds and hundreds of autographs from the 1940s and 1950’s. These autographs included famous athletes, military heroes, cultural icons, celebrities, heads of state, and world leaders.

World-Wide Life

Mr. Theodore Stillwell was born in 1907 and lived his whole life in the Ephrata, PA area. He was a career US postal worker. Although he never travelled, he enjoyed living a “world-wide” life vicariously through writing hundreds of letters throughout the 1940s. His letters afforded him the opportunity to collect an array of autographs, photos, flags, military patches, and correspondence.

Highlights include Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson, who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball. This 1947 letter personalized to Stillwell refers to Robinson being too new to the Brooklyn Dodgers team to request a baseball. There is also a Honus Wagner signed photo and a Mrs. Eleanor Gehrig (Lou Gehrig) letter. This is an autographed football from Amos Alonzo Stagg, an American athlete who played for Yale in 1885-1889, Springfield YMCA and college coach. There are signed items from American manufacturer, Aviator, and movie producer, Howard Hughes, and from Gen. George S. Patton, plus even more.

One of Stillwell’s letters to Patton dated March 20, 1943, is in the Library of Congress and is noted in the dissertation “In need of a hero? The Creation and Use of the Legend of General George S. Patton, Jr” by Nathan C. Jones, curator, historian, author, and museologist at The General George Patton Museum.

One-Of-A-Kind Opportunity

This impressive collection was discovered in December of 2021 in a trunk in the attic of the family home. This collection was reviewed by JSA, James Spence Authentication. Notable autographs received a Letter of Authenticity (LOA) or a Basic Certificate (COA).

This exciting auction is an opportunity for the public to secure many unique and one-of-a-kind autographs.

“We are honored to have discovered this treasure chest,” said Tim Keller, lead auctioneer, “Not only for the sisters, but also for the fact that these autographs, letters, and flags will be treasured by others for years to come. We are happy to bring this collection out of a foot locker to be enjoyed by the world.”

While online bidding is open now, a live auctioneer will be selling the items on Tuesday, June 7th, 2022 at 11:00am Eastern Time through an internet-only simulcast auction.

More information

To find out more about the auction, H.K. Keller’s list of services or how they can help your family or business experience the same success selling their assets as their long list of happy customers, please call H.K. Keller at 717-879-0110 or visit HERE.

Memorial Day illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

The Meaning Behind Memorial Day

THE MEANING BEHIND MEMORIAL DAY

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

“How important it is for us to recognize and celebrate our heroes and she-roes.” – Maya Angelou

Memorial Day, once referred to as Decoration Day, is an American holiday in the United States that honors military personnel along as well as mourn those that we have lost along the way. Decoration Day was for decorating graves with flowers, wreaths, and flags. Memorial Day is formerly observed on the last Monday of May each year. It is a solemn day, but it is also important to reflect upon, appreciate and be thankful for the freedom that we all get to enjoy every day in the United States of America.

Many gather with friends and family for barbeques and celebrating the beginning of summer while others visit cemeteries and memorials to remember their loved ones lost. Each year a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time on Memorial Day. It is important to remember that we are not celebrating the wars, instead we are remembering those who served and those who gave their last breath in order to ensure that the freedoms of our country would be passed on to the next generations. We remember for the price they paid for the cost of our freedom – their lives given so ours could go on.

Memorial Day was originated after the American Civil War, where the United States faced the task of burying and honoring 600,000 to 800,000 Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the bloodiest military conflict in American history. The first commemoration of Memorial Day was held in Arlington National Cemetery on May 30, 1868. On this day, both Union and Confederate soldiers were laid to rest. Over the years, cities across the United States host Memorial Day parades that involve military personnel and members of veterans’ organizations. Americans sometimes wear a red poppy in remembrance of their loved ones, which is a tradition that was born from a World War 1 poem.  

In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Memorial Day has a different meaning behind it for every American. Here at 360 Magazine, we were able to get a few opinions from veterans in the United States.

  • Kyle Skovlund: United States Air Force – Memorial Day has a different meaning for me. Growing up, my parents would travel to Brookings, South Dakota each year to put flowers on the graves of those they had lost. When my own daughter passed away, I began doing the same thing. Memorial Day, for me, is a day to reflect on those that have been lost.
  • Michael Miller: United States Air Force – Memorial Day means remembering and celebrating. Remembering the great men and women that gave their life for our great nation and celebrating the freedoms their sacrifices have given us.
  • J.M. Skovlund: United States Army  – “Memorial Day means exactly what it was intended for, to remember and honor our fallen. They went above and beyond for our country, for the soldier on their left and right, and that’s something not everyone can say.” “Go out and remember the fallen the way you see fit. Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing. If it’s having a drink in their honor, do that. If it’s going to their grave to chat, do that. Either way, remember the fallen the best way you can, don’t disgrace them.”