Posts tagged with "Karen"

TikTok Star Tyler Regan featured in 360 MAGAZINE

CORNELLIAN TURNED COMEDIAN

Listen to Social Media Sensation Tyler Regan and fellow Cornell alum Vaughn Lowery chat on 360 MAG Apple / Spotify podcast HERE.

Breakout Comedian and TikTok Star Tyler Regan‘s one man skits have amassed over half a billion views

Tyler Regan‘s one-man-show of comedic brilliance coupled with naturalistic writing skills has amassed him a sort of cult-like following with 1.4 million TikTok followers and over 2 million followers across all his social media platforms. His comedy-centric content now has over half a billion cumulative views with topics ranging from office etiquette to Karens.

Although the Cornell University alum has been creating videos since 2017, he’s best known for his solid mix of commentary on politics and current events and clever representation of awkward everyday life experiences. “Finding your voice is a journey,” Tyler says, “… And it wasn’t until the pandemic forced my content to become a one-man show that I truly found mine.”

Having grown up on a steady diet of Chris Rock, Dave Chappelle, Monty Python and Robin Williams, Tyler fell into the comedy profession by accident, quite literally. The realism in his subject matter and deadpan delivery was honed, in part by the misfortune of a college soccer sports injury. He understood how to identify and distill the humorous elements of everyday life to tell relevant stories because, as Robin Williams says, “Comedy can be a cathartic way to deal with personal trauma.”

The Philly native is currently filming social media content from a vintage 1976 Airstream while on a cross country trip with his girlfriend but when he returns to Los Angeles, he will continue to parlay his online fame into off-line opportunities that encompass collaborative creative writing for film/tv, as well as other multimedia projects.

Pursuing his comedy dreams in the face of despair, Tyler has the potential to occupy a place in America’s cultural heart.

ABOUT TYLER REGAN

For Tyler Regan, a career in comedy was not on his radar. He spent his adolescent and young adult years in Philadelphia tirelessly preparing to become a professional soccer player. However, at the dawn of his childhood vision becoming a reality, he suffered a devastating ankle injury that forced him into premature retirement.

In 2015, Tyler pursued a master’s degree in engineering from Drexel University and settled into an assistant project manager position. Tyler’s then girlfriend was a content creator who encouraged him to craft and post comical videos to his social media platform. He looked at the opportunity as an outlet to escape the boredom of his 9-to-5 and be his authentically weird self. It wasn’t long before his brand of humor attracted an audience and took on a life of its own, which prompted a move to Los Angeles in 2017 but imposter syndrome set in. While he always had an interest in the film/tv industry, even enrolling in film classes that lead to him composing an original screenplay he submitted to a film festival in his early teens and graduating from Cornell with a BA in media studies. 

Once in Hollywood, Tyler continued to put in work by posting daily videos of witty skits alongside actors to his YouTube channel. His dedication and consistency boosted his popularity and kept his subscribers eagerly tuned in for 2 years but he still hadn’t found his niche. And then the pandemic hit. The digital entertainer used the lockdown to pivot to TikTok and build the kind of content he wanted to make with the confidence that his tribe would gravitate towards him.

WATCH TYLER IN ACTION

Cheesecake Factory Be Like

Anti-Vaxxers Be Like

Budget Airlines Be Like

Full Tyler Interview on YT HERE

Comedic TikTok Star Tyler Regan featured in 360 MAGAZINE
Mel Quargrainie for use by 360 Magazine

Rittenhouse Murder Trial Reaches The End

By: McKinley Franklin

After 24 hours of deliberations, Kyle Rittenhouse has been found not guilty on all charges. Read more about the case and Rittenhouse’s shooting on the night of August 25, 2020 at a Black Lives Matter protest HERE.

Let’s analyze the trial and how the jury came to their decision.

The Rittenhouse trial resumed once again on November 11, as the closing arguments of the case have commenced. At the top of the day, the case progressed, and Judge Bruce Schroeder dropped the sixth count that Rittenhouse faced. This sixth count accused Rittenhouse of possession of a dangerous weapon by a person under 18. Although the prosecution objected this, Schroeder ultimately ended up dropping the charge.

Rittenhouse’s attorneys also filed for a mistrial shortly after the charge was dropped. Schroeder conveyed this news, announcing that Rittenhouse’s team had filed an official motion for mistrial, which read “The state has repeatedly violated instructions from the Court, acted in bad faith and intentionally provided technological evidence which was different from theirs. For those reasons, the defendant respectfully requests the Court find ‘prosecutorial overreaching’ existed, that overreaching was intentional and in bad faith and thereby grant the defendant’s motion for a mistrial with prejudice.”

The prosecution started their closing arguments first, having head prosecutor on the case Thomas Binger speak about Rittenhouse’s intentions of being in Kenosha. Binger urged the jury to question the intention that Rittenhouse had in Kenosha on the night of the shooting. Binger continued his argument for the prosecution by debunking the rumor that Joseph Rosenbaum, one of Rittenhouse’s two victims, threatened to kill him earlier on the night of the shooting. The prosecution highlights this to communicate to the jury that they believe Rosenbaum posed no real threat to Rittenhouse when the shooting occurred.

As the closing argument resumed, businesses in Kenosha started boarding up their storefronts amidst the final verdict of the case. 500 Wisconsin National Guard troops are reportedly on standby in Kenosha as well.

The prosecution wrapped up their final closing arguments with Binger arguing that Rittenhouse was not acting in self-defense. Binger points out that Rittenhouse killed two unarmed men and wounded another with a firearm that did not belong to him. While Binger has used several videos from the shooting as evidence to the jury, he urged the jury that Rittenhouse is guilty of all the counts against him.

Binger closes, “He committed first-degree reckless homicide against Joseph Rosenbaum. He put Richie McGinniss’s life in jeopardy. He put jump-kick-man’s life in jeopardy. He intended to kill Anthony Huber and he attempted to kill Gaige Grosskreutz. The question is whether or not you believe that his actions were legally justified, and I submit to you that no reasonable person would have done what the defendant did. And that makes your decision easy.”

The defense began their closing argument critiquing the arguments of the prosecution. Rittenhouse’s defense attorney Mark Richards argues that Rosenbaum was intentionally trying to attack the defendant and that he even had his hand on the gun. Richards asked the jury to “use your common sense and judgment” when contemplating if Rosenbaum was a real danger to Rittenhouse when the shooting occurred.

As the closing argument continued, defense attorney Richards argued that there has been a “rush to judgment” in the case. Richards pointed out that after the shooting on August 25, 2020, there were rumors circulating about the shooting and Rittenhouse’s intentions. There was talk about the fact that Rittenhouse crossed state lines to attend the protests and brought his AR-15 with him.

Richards then stated that Gaige Grosskreutz should have not provoked Kyle Rittenhouse. The defense attorney says that Grosskreutz should have “let him be and go give aid and comfort” to Rosenbaum who was just previously shot by Rittenhouse. Richards also argues that Grosskreutz was proceeding on Rittenhouse when he was shot, and this was part of the reason for him shooting.

Richards goes on with his point that Rittenhouse was not searching for trouble when he went to Kenosha despite what the prosecution argued. The defense states that Rittenhouse “feels for this community,” and that he was not trying to start conflict.” The defense soon after wrapped up their closing arguments, and the court went on break.

After returning from the break, the prosecution began their rebuttal. Attorney James Kraus argued that it was unnecessary for Rittenhouse to react to threats by using deadly force. The prosecution says that Rittenhouse should have used all other methods of self-defense before turning to shooting.

Deliberations for the Rittenhouse trial began on November 16, 2021. The panel of 18 potential jurors was narrowed down to 12, with those who were not chosen to serve as alternates. The jury consists of five men and seven women. During the first day of deliberations, the jurors made two requests for more copies of the jury instructions. The jury was dismissed on November 15 after a little over eight hours.

The second day of deliberations continued for the Rittenhouse trial again on November 17, 2021. Judge Schroeder did receive a question from the jury during the morning of November 17, asking about the reviewal process of video evidence in the case. The question was essentially if the jurors would be able to view videos in private or in the courtroom.

Schroeder also addressed the fact that he had not had a chance to read the defense’s motion for mistrial with prejudice. He explains that only one day prior to November 17 he received the motion. Schroeder continues, stating “And I really think before I rule on a motion, I should let the state respond. So why anyone would think, it is odd for the judge to sit on a motion to dismiss, I have no idea.”

Following the request of video evidence earlier during the day of November 17, this permission was granted to the jury. The jury requested a livestream video shot by Gaige Grosskreutz. The livestream was shot moments after Rittenhouse shot Joseph Rosenbaum.

Deliberations continued through November 19, and after 24 hours of deliberations, the jury found Kyle Rittenhouse not guilty on all charges he faced.

Judge Bruce Schroeder spoke to the jury and thanked them for their efforts, stating “”All of you – I couldn’t have asked for a better jury to work with, and it has truly been my pleasure. I think without commenting on your verdict… the verdict themselves, just in terms of your attentiveness and the cooperation that you gave to us justifies the confidence that the founders of our country placed in you.”

Yung Gravy Releases “Magic”

YUNG GRAVY RELEASES NEW SINGLE “MAGIC”

Buzzing Minnesota-born rapper Yung Gravy releases his new single “Magic” today.

Listen to “Magic”: HERE

“Magic” follows up the viral success of his Snow Cougar EP, which features a bevy of bangers including “Mr. Clean” and “1 Thot 2 Thot Red Thot Blue Thot,” which are both certified gold by the RIAA. The rapper just wrapped up his sold out US tour and is ready for the world to hear his new music.

Inspired by everyone from OutKast, Nate Dogg, Curren$y, and Action Bronson to Patrice Rushen and The Blackbyrds, Yung Gravy ditched class took to SoundCloud to begin releasing music in 2016. The first song he uploaded, “Karen”, quickly garnished new fans and stirred a palpable buzz online. His first EP, Mr. Clean, went viral on the strength of “Continental Breakfast”—which cracked the 1-million mark on Soundcloud. Sandwiching a sample of The Chordettes’ “Mr. Sandman” between raunchy and raw rhymes, the title track “Mr. Clean” soundtracked countless fan videos and ignited 9.6 million Soundcloud plays in under a year. Throughout 2017, he prolifically unleashed a string of nonstop music, including Thanksgiving’s Eve, Yung Gravity EP, and Baby Gravy EP. Soon, he reached #1 on Indify and had labels knocking at his door.

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