Posts tagged with "Washington State"

Coffee illustration for 360 Magazine

Coffee Capitals of America

By Hannah DiPilato

With National Coffee Day on September 29 followed by International Coffee Day on October first, Wren Kitchen delved into the nation’s coffee-drinking habits to see which states have the greatest consumption of everyone’s favorite hot beverage. 

Their research revealed that The United States drinks 48 billion cups of coffee each year, they have discovered the number one coffee capital of the United States, and the data shows which region has the highest demand for the caffeinated favorite. 

Coffee represents much more than just a drink. It’s a wakeup call bright and early in the morning, a chance to catch up with old friends or a moment for yourself in the middle of a chaotic workday. Pouring yourself a cup of coffee in your kitchen sets you up for the busy day ahead.

There’s no doubt The United States is a coffee-loving nation and a new report by Wren Kitchens has revealed which state craves coffee the most. They have also illustrated which iconic landmarks each state could build with coffee cups based on the coffee consumption of citizens. Grab a cup of joe and read on to find out how your state ranks.

Oregon has been crowned the ultimate coffee capital drinking over 113 Empire State buildings worth of coffee every year. The Beaver State shows that it’s citizens drink the most coffee based on the demand for coffee and population size.

The state consumes more than 624 million cups of coffee per year and if you were to stack up this number of coffee cups in real life, Oregon would drink enough coffee to create 113 Empire State buildings each year. 

With Oregonians having such an appetite for their cup of Joe, search data shows that 2.1% of the states 4.2 million goes online to search for their caffeine fix each month

The second-largest coffee-loving state is Colorado. With a population of 5.7 million, the state of Colorado drinks 852 million cups of coffee every year. The search data reveals that 1.9% of Coloradans head online to look up their nearest coffee spot.

Washington state follows on the list with the third-most online coffee searches, 1.8% of the state’s population searching for java each month, and more than 1.1 billion coffees consumed each year. This is no surprise coming from the state that founded Starbucks. 

When searching to find the region that drinks the most coffee, the west coast takes the prize. With three of the top five states having the greatest demand for coffee based on the Pacific, the West Coast is the place they pay homage to the barista. Nowhere more can this be seen than California with the state sipping more than 5.8 billion cups of the steaming beans.

The data was gathered by looking at search volumes against the population and the average amount of coffee consumed per person. Data for this research was collected from worldatlas.com, statista.com, ncausa.org and The United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 

To work out the coffee capitals, volumes per state surrounding coffee were researched and were calculated as a percent of the state’s population. Then the height, area, and dimensions of landmarks in the US were looked at; before working out the number of 12oz coffee cups it would take to fill each landmark. Finally, how many times each state could cover each landmark with the number of cups of coffee they consume each year was worked out.

Seattle Illustration by Mina Tocalini

Seattle Diversity Training

By Eamonn Burke

The City of Seattle recently held a training about Interrupting Internalized Racial Superiority for their white employees. Traits of internalized racism, according to the diversity trainers that led the session, include individualism, objectivity, and intellectualization.

The training included an extensive list of oppressive behavior that white people can commit against their co-workers, as well as a guideline for being allies to minorities. The city also encourages self affirmation in one’s contribution to the persistence of racism, with a goal of “undoing whiteness”. A visual aid of the racist “cycle” was included in the training. Another handout read: “racism is not our fault but we are responsible.”

A major focus of the training was that white people had to “give up” certain privileges to truly purge themselves of internalized racism. The diversity trainers specified these privileges to include comfort as well as social status and control. Lastly, they gave examples of achieving the status of a “white ally” to describe the goal of the training.

The goal, as described by the city in an email, is for “city employees who identify as white to join this training to learn, reflect, challenge ourselves, and build skills and relationships that help us show up more fully as allies and accomplices for racial justice.”

Peter McLoughlin Done as Seahawks President and CEO

By Reid Urban

Peter McLoughlin, the president of the Seahawks for the last eight years, is out of the job.

The team announced on Monday that McLoughlin will be replaced by Chuck Arnold, who has been with the Seahawks for 25 years. Meanwhile, Burt Kolde, who is the vice-chairman of the Seahawks, said that McLoughlin’s contract was expiring and that it was a good time to do organizational restructuring.

As a part of that restructuring, it was announced that Chris McGowan will be promoted to Vulcan Sports and Entertainment CEO, and that Arnold will report directly to McGowan.

As the new team president, Arnold will manage all the team business operations and will also serve as president of First & Goal Inc., as well as overseeing the management of CenturyLink Field, CenturyLink Field Event Center, First & Goal Hospitality, and the WaMu Theater.

Kolde said on Monday that the contract was the main reason for the change.

This move comes during a time when it looks like the Seahawks are rebuilding the team on the field and coach Pete Carroll only has two years left on his contract.