Posts tagged with "extremism"

Canadian Goose with basketball illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

PETA Attacks NBA Over Sponsorship

PETA Attacks NBA Over Canada Goose Sponsorship

Natural Fibers Alliance Blows Foul on Extremism

This week members of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) demanded the NBA scuttle its new multiyear partnership with Canada Goose. On Monday, the Canadian company announced a multi-year partnership with the NBA to develop specialized attire for NBA All-Star Games.

PETA has had a long-running campaign against Canada Goose because the company uses feathers and fur in some of its outerwear. PETA has vigorously attempted to ban the use of all leather, wool, fur, cashmere, down, and silk at the federal, state, and local levels because they are derived from animals–including the leather used to make basketballs.

Mike Brown, head of sustainability and communications with the Natural Fibers Alliance, issued the following response to PETA: PETA has gotten so extreme that it would ban basketballs simply because they’re made with leather. This is a lay-up for the league: Tell PETA to hit the showers.”

Not only does PETA’s advocacy against natural materials harm the environment but threatens consumers’ freedom of choice. Synthetic clothing is one of the top global polluters of waterways. Researchers estimate that synthetic fabrics alone are responsible for up to 35 percent of microplastic pollution in our oceans; synthetic clothing “sheds” microparticles when cleaned. Natural fibers, in contrast, are a sustainable and renewable resource.

The Natural Fibers Alliance is a newly formed environmental justice coalition representing wool, leather, fur, and other naturally produced materials. For additional comments or questions, contact Mike Brown.

Radicalized Loyalties

By: Fabien Truong

In the wake of the Syrian terrorist attacks in France, the UK and elsewhere, there has been a growing concern about the ‘radicalization’ of young Muslims. Deprived areas of Western cities are believed to have become breeding grounds of home-grown extremism. But how do young Muslims growing up in the cities of the West really live?

This book takes us into the housing estates on the outskirts of Paris where we get to know Adama, Radouane, Hassan, Tarik, Marley and a shadowy figure whose name would suddenly and brutally become known to the world at the time of the Charlie Hebdo shootings in Paris in January 2015: Amédy Coulibaly. Seeing Amédy through the eyes of his close friends and these other young Muslim men in the neighbourhoods where they grew up, Fabien Truong uncovers a dense network of competing social loyalties and maps the road these youths take to resolve the conflicts they face: becoming Muslim.

On the peripheries of the modern city, boys become men through their loyalty to their neighbourhood, to their brotherhood, to their intangible family history, to the nation and the ideal of equal opportunities, to capitalism and its promotion of individualism, masculinity and economic success. Yet they need to move away from contradictions fuelled by an insecurity that stems from the pervasiveness of crime, policing and the political emptiness of everyday materialism.

Islam stands, often alone, as a resource or a gateway – as if it were the last route to ‘escape’ without betrayal and to ‘fight’ in a meaningful and noble way. Becoming Muslim does not necessarily lead to the radicalized ‘other’. It is more like a long-distance race, a powerful reconversion of the self that allows for introspection and change. But it can also become a belligerent presentation of the self that transforms a dead-end into a call for arms.

By enabling us to understand ‘them’, this book also helps ‘us’ to understand ourselves and our societies better, as well as shedding valuable light on the new forms of violence we face in a world where one is not born, but rather becomes, a warrior.