Posts tagged with "healthy foods"

Organic PBFit

Better Body Foods’ Organic PBfit is everything you love about peanut butter, made better. Whole-roasted organic peanuts, pressed to perfection, means Organic PBfit contains 87% less fat than traditional peanut butter, and about 1/3 the calories. In contrast to regular peanut butter, Organic PBfit is only 70 kcal compared to 188 kcal and only has 2 grams of fat compared to 16 grams of fat. All that’s left is powerful organic peanut protein, and a rich, guilt-free flavor you’ll crave on everything. So go ahead — lick the spoon.

The process for making Better Body Foods’ Organic PBfit peanuts starts in the humid climate of the state of Georgia, USA, where 2 out of 5 peanuts in the US are grown. After they are collected, the peanuts are gently roasted and pressed to remove most of the oil (fat and calories). Those pressed peanuts are then grounded into a fine powder and blended with coconut sugar and a pinch of salt. Finally, Organic PBfit peanut butter powder is packaged in a GMP and SQF certified facility in Utah. 

Visit their website for PBfit recipes! 

About Better Body Foods:

With a family history of diabetes, founder, Stephen Richards, made a life-changing decision: To become healthier by making better food choices. That’s why he created BetterBody Foods®. To produce delicious, nutritious and ‘better for you’ foods he felt comfortable sharing with his family. Stephen’s journey took him to Mexico, the land of agave, and then to Asia, home to coconut oil, coconut flour and coconut palm sugar. And that was just the beginning.

Today, they source natural ingredients from over 20 countries and do all the blending and packaging ourselves in our state of the art facility at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Utah. They don’t produce anything they – and their families – wouldn’t eat themselves, maintaining the highest standard of food safety and the best taste. 

In addition to their website, their products are available at major retail stores including Walmart, Costco, HEB, Albertson’s, Amazon, etc.

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Snapdragon and Rubyfrost Apples X San Diego Zoo

SNAPDRAGON AND RUBYFROST APPLES FROM NEW YORK

San Diego Zoo to ‘Exhibit’ the Indigenous, New York SnapDragon

The hottest apple from New York with the Monster Crunch to be given out at pop-up sampling event at the world-famous San Diego Zoo.

On Saturday, February 22nd, Crunch Time Apple Growers will be giving out SnapDragon apples at the San Diego Zoo during a pop-up sampling event that’s happening right on Front Street — the main thoroughfare into the Zoo.

Last year on that date, the Zoo had 15,500 attendees walk down Front Street — which is why Crunch Time chose this high-traffic location for its pop-up sampling event.

“The San Diego Zoo is a national destination for families. And Front Street gets a ton of foot traffic, which makes it the ideal place to give out this incredible apple to potentially thousands of people,” says Rena Montedoro, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Crunch Time. “The name of the apple is also an ideal tie-in with SnapDragon’s ‘Monster Crunch’ tagline…even the word ‘Dragon’ makes it seem like a unique zoo exhibit featuring an exotic creature. It just all fits together.”

In addition to putting on the pop-up sampling event, Crunch Time will be co-sponsoring an online sweepstakes where consumers can win 4 tickets to the San Diego Zoo and their ‘Animals in Action’ tour, with tour tickets provided by the San Diego Zoo. Crunch Time will cover the hotel expenses for the 4 winners — along with providing them with a box of SnapDragon apples, apparel, and up to $1000 in airfare.

“Even though people come to the Zoo from all over the country, sampling this apple in a key, West Coast location enables us to shine the spotlight on one of Northeast’s and New York’s hottest apples — specifically a variety with such a unique flavor profile like SnapDragon,” adds Montedoro.

Bite a Crunch Time Apple. Support a Farmer!
When you bite into a Crunch Time apple, you’re not just tasting an incredible apple, but the incredible love and labor of 147 family farmers across New York State. Every Crunch Time apple is non-GMO, super crunchy, delightfully juicy, beautifully colored and carefully grown. Plus, when you purchase a Crunch Time apple, you’re not only biting into a little history, you’re helping to sustain the future of family farming for generations to come. For more information please visit crunchtimeapplegrowers.com, SnapDragonApple.com or Rubyfrostapple.com.

FOOD SAFETY TIPS

11 food safety tips to pack for spring break

Whether you spend spring break partying in a city, exploring a different country or getting some R&R at home, don’t let food safety take a vacation. “Spring break is the perfect time to make memories with family and friends and Stop Foodborne Illness wants to make sure it’s the FUN MEMORIES that fill up your social media,” says Stop Foodborne Illness CEO, Deirdre Schlunegger.

Maintaining basic food safety standards, like washing hands, and adding some travel-specific practices is the best way to ensure foodborne illness won’t interrupt a fun getaway. Check out the Stop Foodborne Illness top tips for food safety during spring break.

All-inclusive resorts have many perks; they are touted as safer, more affordable, ideal for partying and usually include 24/7 buffets. Having unlimited access to food and drink is convenient, but can be potentially dangerous. Buffets serve large amounts of food over long periods of time, meaning there are more opportunities for food to not be kept at consistent, correct temperatures. Additionally, everyone shares the same serving utensils, increasing the risk of spreading pathogens. Since many all-inclusive resorts also have sit-down dining options on site, Stop Foodborne Illness recommends avoiding the buffet when possible and following these tips when it’s not.

• There’s always the possibility that food has not been held at proper temperatures – cold foods (salads, cold cuts, dressings) should be cold and hot foods (soups, meats, fish) should be hot. Any food that’s served at room temperature, and isn’t supposed to be, is within the temperature “danger zone” where bacteria can thrive.

• If you’ve gotten away to a warmer climate, remember the one-hour rule. Any perishable foods that have been sitting out beyond one hour when the temperature is higher than 90° F, is not safe to consume. (It’s 2 hours, if the temperature is below 90° F.)

• Another source of contamination is when food is mishandled by people with unclean hands. If you see something, say something. Don’t assume anything. And, of course, after a day’s activities, be sure to wash your own hands before eating.

• Fresh fruit and vegetables from the buffet can be a great poolside snack but don’t forget to wash and peel the tasty treat before eating. If you’re in an area with unsafe water, wash the produce with bottled or filtered water.

Eating and drinking can be some of the best things about travelling abroad. While “going local” is a delicious way to experience a new cuisine, it can also be an easier way to contract foodborne illness. Stop encourages travelers to be adventurous, but smart when it comes to consuming food in different countries.

Street food is a great way to experience local culture, but often, stalls don’t have the same hygiene standards as restaurants that cater to tourists. Stop Foodborne Illness recommends being aware of this difference and making wise choices when enjoying dishes from local restaurants or street stands.

• Avoid establishments where the food handlers don’t practice good hygiene, such as tying back their hair, wearing protective gloves and having clean hands and fingernails.

Be selective when choosing foods. Avoid raw milk and raw milk cheeses, and other raw foods—including undercooked meat and seafood, and uncooked vegetables —as well as foods that require a lot of handling before serving.

• Be extra cautions when visiting a remote destination. Turn up the food safety dial a notch; even though you may enjoy certain foods and beverages at home—like rare meat or runny eggs—it’s better to avoid questionable foods while in a different country. (Being sick in a language you don’t know can really complicate matters.)

As they say, half the fun is getting there! When you’re road tripping, in a rental or hopping on a plane, make sure you arrive at your destination safely with safe snacking habits.

• Sanitize tray tables, seat armrests and door handles with an 60% alcohol-based wipe. These frequently touched areas are generally made of plastic, a nonporous material that allows germs to live on longer, and have a higher risk of spreading foodborne illness.

• Keep food out of the danger zone. Make sure cold food stays cold—at or below 40°F—by packing it in coolers with frozen gel packs or ice. Stop Foodborne Illness suggests packing beverages in one cooler and perishable foods in another since you are likely to grab beverages most often while on the road. Since hot food needs to stay hot—at or above 140°F, Stop Foodborne Illness suggests passing on hot foods and opting instead for peanuts, and other nuts (including nut butters), jelly, crackers, chips, dried fruit, baked goods such as cookies or muffins, granola bars, popcorn, and whole fresh fruits like bananas, apples, and oranges.

• Rinse all fresh produce under running tap water (and patting it dry) before packing it in a cooler, including produce with peel-away skins or rinds. Follow this checklist to make sure coolers are packed properly.

Not going anywhere? Enjoy a relaxing staycation at home but don’t let your food safety practices go on a break. The best way to prevent the spread of foodborne illness is to continue following proper food safety. Wash your hands for 20 seconds before handling food, cook food to a safe internal temperature and clean cooking equipment and surfaces after preparing raw foods. Visit website for more food safety tips.

About Stop Foodborne Illness

Stop Foodborne Illness is a national nonprofit, public health organization dedicated to preventing illness and death from foodborne pathogens by promoting sound food safety policy and best practices, building public awareness, and assisting those impacted by foodborne illness. For more food safety tips please visit here. If you think you have been sickened from food, contact your local health professional. You may subscribe to receive Stop Foodborne Illness e-Alerts and eNews here.

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