Posts tagged with "good manufacturing practice"

Football Image for 360 Magazine by Rita Azar

Russell Wilson’s Good Man Brand

A November 7 article on Sportscasting reports on NFL Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson’s generosity in using his clothing brand to give to communities in need. The article notes that Wilson’s clothing company, Good Man Brand, donates 3% of all purchases to the Why Not You Foundation, another one of Wilson’s charitable endeavors, to provide food and career guidance for those in need.

Los Angeles-based manufacturer Hi-Tech Printing & Labeling Inc. says that brands big and small should be sure to take advantage of all marketing opportunities available to advertise their unique message and branding.

Hi-Tech Printing & Labeling Inc. says that while the most obvious locations to include a brand’s ethics are on the company’s website, online product descriptions, and in-store marketing, clothing tags, and labels are just as important and are often overlooked for their benefits.

The Los Angeles manufacturer adds that by including a brand’s message on fabric tags and labels, it reminds customers of the causes they’re supporting each time they wear a product, which helps to encourage future purchases as well.

Without a message’s integration on clothing tags, Hi-Tech Printing & Labeling Inc. says customers will only be reminded of the charitable connection if they actively visit a physical store or the company’s online shop. Even a big fan of a product is going to see clothing labels many more times than they are ever likely to see its website or advertising, says the manager.

For a brand’s message to remain visible over time, Hi-Tech Printing & Labeling Inc. says it’s important for clothing tags and labels to be made from high-quality materials that will not wear or fade for a long time. The Los Angeles manufacturer notes that product tags can only be effective if they can remain fully intact even after numerous wash cycles. Brands that invest in durable fabric labels demonstrate their attention to detail to customers.

Hi-Tech Printing & Labeling Inc. says that telling customers of a brand’s ethics is crucial for brand loyalty. Whether it’s sustainability or supporting a local community, customers are more likely to purchase products from a company whose mission they support. The Southern California company adds that oftentimes, individuals are more than happy to donate to a good cause; they just don’t know where to start.

By ensuring that a clothing brand’s message is clearly advertised across all marketing opportunities, including clothing tags and labels, customers will always remember the company and causes they’re supporting and where they can return to for more.

Readers interested in learning more about Hi-Tech Printing & Labeling Inc. and its offerings can call (213) 746-7772 or visit its website at https://www.fabriclabels.com.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, COVID-19

Rice University’s Charcoal Research

Researchers at Rice University find that charcoal, and other materials described in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Nano Materials, could aid treatment COVID-19 patients.

In the project co-led by Rice chemist James Tour, researchers found oxidized charcoal nanoparticles are not only effective antioxidants, but can also be made from an activated carbon source that is inexpensive, good manufacturing practice (GMP) certified, and already being used in humans to treat acute poisoning.

“That these nanozymes are made from a GMP source opens the door for drug manufacturers,” said Tour, who led the project with A&M neurologist Thomas Kent and UTHealth biochemist Ah-Lim Tsai. “While coal was effective, an issue is that it can have a variety of toxic metallic elements and impurities that are not consistent across samples. And the clusters made from carbon nanotubes are very expensive.”

The researchers noted it may be worthwhile to study the application of their nanozymes to treat the cytokine storms – an excessive immune system response to infection – suspected of contributing to tissue and organ damage in COVID-19 patients.

“While speculative that these particles will be helpful in COVID-19, if administration is timed correctly, they could reduce the damaging radicals that accompany the cytokine storm and could be further chemically modified to reduce other injury-causing features of this disease,” Kent said.

Gang Wu, an assistant professor of hematology at McGovern, and Rice graduate student Emily McHugh are co-lead authors of the study. Co-authors are Vladimir Berka, a senior research scientist at McGovern; Rice graduate students Weiyin Chen, Zhe Wang and Jacob Beckham; Rice undergraduate Trenton Roy; and Paul Derry, an assistant professor at Texas A&M’s Institute of Biosciences and Technology.

Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice. Kent is the Robert A. Welch Chair Professor in the Institute of Biosciences and Technology at Texas A&M-Houston Campus and an adjunct chemistry professor at Rice and at Houston Methodist Hospital. Tsai is a professor of hematology at UTHealth. Click here to read all of the findings of the Rice University researchers’ work.