Posts tagged with "Election Day"

T.V. Illustration for 360 Magazine by Kaelen Felix

Bravo Presents “Race in America: Our Vote Counts”

With less than a month away from the most pivotal election in decades, media is increasingly involving themselves in the political conversation. Bravo counts down to the election of a lifetime with a pivotal conversation, Race in America: Our Vote Counts,” airing Sunday, November 1, at 10 PM ET/PT. The special will also be simulcast on E!. In this election, the Black vote is more important than ever before. Ten Bravolebrities and celebs are coming together to talk about the issues America faces today and to put it all in the context of Black history. The 90-minute special from Executive Producers Leslie D. Farrell and Dorothy Toran is produced by Lauren Grace Media. Kandi Burruss is also an Executive Producer. For a sneak peek, please visit here.

Host Nina Parker returns to the roundtable with celebs from across the NBC broadcast and cable entertainment networks for an open dialogue on the power of the black vote on both a local and national level. The discussion will also cover the vital role that local elections play in changing the system, the changes this new generation can make with their vote, and what effect the pandemic could have on people going to the polls. From the doctors speaking on how to safely vote in person to an emotional conversation on Black people’s voting experience and how it has affected them more than any other race in the country, this compelling special strives to educate, speak to the key issues, and ignite Americans to exercise their right to vote. The panelists include:

Gizelle Bryant from “The Real Housewives of Potomac”

Dr. Britten Cole from “Married to Medicine Los Angeles”

Zuri Hall from “Access Hollywood”

Dr. Heavenly Kimes from “Married to Medicine Atlanta”

Dr. Damon Kimes from “Married to Medicine Atlanta”

Tamica Lee from “Southern Charm New Orleans”

Jon Moody from “Southern Charm New Orleans”

Dr. Wendy Osefo from “The Real Housewives of Potomac”

Barry Smith from “Southern Charm New Orleans”

Justin Sylvester from “E! News”

All of these celebrities are working to use their platform to fuel productive conversations about race and politics in America. Tune in on November 1, just two days before election day, to take part in the national discussion. “Race in America: Our Vote Counts” is produced for Bravo by Lauren Grace Media with Leslie D. Farrell and Dorothy Toran serving as executive producers. Kandi Burrus is also an Executive Producer.

Presidents Illustration for 360 Magazine by Maria Soloman

Safe and Secure Use of Ballot Drop Boxes in CA

California will make ballot drop boxes more widely available in the November 2020 election than in any previous election.California Common Cause supports this unprecedented expansion in voting access because voters in the the November 2020 election must contend with dual threats:

1. The pandemic, which will make many uneasy with voting at a polling place or vote center.
2. Decaying trust in the United States Postal Service and the vote-by-mail process, because of sustained but unsubstantiated attacks from loud voices in our national politics.

Ballot drop boxes solve both problems. They give voters a safe, secure method to return a vote-by-mail ballot that is controlled and operated by the county elections office, without requiring voters to visit an in-person site or use the mail.

California voters should use official ballot drop boxes with confidence. County-run ballot drop boxes are tamper-proof, are governed by a strict set of safety protocols, and are required to meet language and disability access requirements. Ballots picked up from ballot drop boxes are managed with tight chain-of-custody controls.

Voters should look up official, county-operated ballot drop boxes located near them

Unfortunately, the California Repubulican Party has created informal or unofficial ballot drop boxes that may confuse or mislead voters and create distrust in official ballot drop boxes.

Background and context are important. In 2016, California passed a law expanding voters’ ability to transmit their ballot to a third party for return. Previously, only a family or household member could return a voter’s vote-by-mail ballot. Under revised law, any third party trusted by the voter can return the voter’s vote-by-mail ballot, provided that the third party is not paid to do so on a per-ballot basis. A relevant example would be a resident of a care home, who can authorize a trusted staff member of the home to return the resident’s ballot on their behalf. The California GOP has argued that its informal drop boxes are legal under this expanded ballot return law.

More importantly for California voters, informal ballot collection sites that are disguised as official ballot drop boxes may trick community members who wish to return their ballot at an official ballot drop box. These unofficial “official” ballot drop boxes create confusion about and erode trust in voting procedures. Interfering with voters’ ability to cast their ballots is unlawful under California law.

California Common Cause encourages every California voter to:

  • Look up where official, county-operated ballot drop boxes are located near them
  • Sign up for Ballot Trax, to get email and text alerts about the status of their ballot, and to confirm that their ballot is counted

Voters in California have several options for returning their ballots. In addition to using an official ballot drop box, voters can return their vote-by-mail ballots by mail or at any voting site on Election Day or in the early voting period. Voters can also vote in person, on Election Day or in the early voting period. County voter information guides and county elections websites should list in-person voting locations.

Presidents Illustration for 360 Magazine by Maria Soloman

Biden’s Fight to Lead

By Hannah DiPilato

Joe Biden is leading in the polls against Donald Trump for the upcoming presidential election. 

Although Hillary Clinton was also in the lead for most of her 2016 campaign and even won the popular vote, she lost due to the electoral college. As of now, Biden is not only leading the popular vote, but there is also evidence that he is ahead when it comes to the electoral vote.

Swing states are critical in deciding the fate of the election. According to a recent poll tracker, Ohio and Iowa, both swing states, are leaning more towards Trump. However, swing states such as Florida, Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Carolina, Arizona and Wisconsin are showing Biden in the lead. 

Wisconsin, Minnesota, New Hampshire and Nevada will be vital for Trump in the upcoming election. Currently, however, the polls are showing that Biden is ahead. Nevada has swung more democratic in recent years, as their demographic of voters has changed from Caucasian voters that leaned right to a larger proportion of working-class minorities. Wisconsin has historically voted democratic from 1988 to 2012, and Trump only had the lead by a small percentage in 2016. Minnesota also generally votes democrat, but Trump believes he could be successful by campaigning to voters in rural areas. What will be necessary for Biden to see victory are securing the few states that Hillary Clinton wasn’t able to obtain – currently he leads in those crucial states. 

Even with his current lead, the fight is not over for Biden. In a Mammoth University poll, Biden was leading in Pennsylvania by thirteen percent in July, but this number had already shrunk to four percent by late August. Earlier in the year, with more media coverage on the Black Lives Matter movement, many democratic activists made sure to stress the importance of voting among younger generations which was helping Biden with votes. Now that the media coverage of the movement has become less prominent, this could explain the change in percentages from July to August. 

Although certain surveys are showing Biden in the lead, the race is still close. According to U.S. News, this is usually how the election plays out. Guy Cecil, chair of the Democratic SuperPAC Priorities USA said to reporters during a conference call that the United States is “still dealing fundamentally and structurally, with a very close election.” The electoral college votes could swing either way, meaning nothing is ever certain in an election. 

The most important thing to recognize is that these polls can never be fully accurate and can lean one way or another based on who is participating. Depending on the demographics of the people surveyed, along with who chooses to respond at all, these polls are only an estimate. 

After the recent and unfortunate death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, many younger generations have been pushing strongly that everyone needs to vote. The death of Ginsburg could allow Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to select another supreme court justice making the supreme court lean more towards the right. However, in Obama’s last year of office McConnell led a blockade against Obama’s ability to nominate another justice with so little time left as president. Biden commented on this issue and said, “Let me be clear: The voters should pick a President, and that President should select a successor to Justice Ginsburg.” The death of Ginsburg so close to November could end up swinging the votes significantly in the upcoming election. However, just like the polls, it all depends on who chooses to participate. 

Kyrsten Sinema Wins Arizona’s U.S. Senate Seat

By Reid Urban

Arizona is finally getting its first female U.S. senator.

Democrat Krysten Sinema rode a wave of Maricopa County voters, as well as voters from her opponent Martha McSally’s congressional district in Tucson, to give her the edge and the eventual win for the Arizona U.S. Senate seat that was being vacated by Jeff Flake.

The Associated Press called the race for Sinema Monday night and McSally ceded, tweeting congratulations to Sinema.

Sinema will become the first woman in the state’s 106-year history to take a seat in the U.S. Senate.

So how did Sinema manage to win? She played towards the moderate Republican voters, the independent voters, and the suburban women, who were anxious about the polarizing politics in the era of President Donald Trump. That gave her the advantage in the urban areas of Arizona. It was too great for McSally to make up.

Sinema maintained that lead on Monday and grew even more with the latest batch of early ballots. With that, she defeated the Republicans’ hopes of maintaining the seat.