Posts tagged with "teacher appreciation"

WonderWorks illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Good Vibrations × WonderWorks Myrtle Beach

Good Vibrations – WonderWorks Myrtle Beach New Exhibit on Earthquakes Named by Teachers during Teacher Appreciation Month

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach has an array of exhibits that help educate people about science. And its latest exhibit on earthquakes called Good Vibrations, opens May 28th. Good Vibrations will spotlight Tuckaleechee Caverns, and how they document seismic activity around the world. The new exhibit was a topic request from educators, so it seemed appropriate that they also name the exhibit.  Teachers are invited to see this exhibit for free during WonderWorks Teacher Appreciation Month celebration.

“This new Earthquake exhibit offers a great opportunity to learn about plate tectonics and all seismic activity,” explains Robert Stinnett, general manager at WonderWorks Myrtle Beach. “We look forward to helping people shake things up and learn this type of science in a fun atmosphere.”

The Tuckaleechee Caverns are home to the most sensitive seismic station on Earth. It detects any and all tectonic movement anywhere in the world. If a country is testing a nuclear weapon or there is an earthquake, it has that information within seconds. Once it does, within 300ths of a millisecond, it relays that important information directly to the U.S. Military; Vienna, Austria; and Geneva, Switzerland. The information is collected 24/7 and is crucial to national security, as well as being able to provide earthquake information.

The exhibit, Good Vibrations will help share the importance of the Tuckaleechee Caverns and what they are doing in monitoring seismic activity. The information in the exhibit meets the educational standards on earthquake and seismic activity, and is one of WonderWorks’ many STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, and math) related learning exhibits.

During the month of May 2021, teachers and all support staff can receive free admission to WonderWorks Myrtle Beach by showing a valid school ID or a pay stub upon entering. Additionally, up to four of their accompany guests can receive 50% off their admission price.

“Teachers are going to love learning about the caverns, and everyone who visits will have a great time,” added Stinnett. “Being able to learn and have fun all in the same place is a beautiful thing. We make it happen every day here at WonderWorks Myrtle Beach.”

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach STEM programs include the WonderWorks WonderKids event, virtual learning labs, ART-OLINA Young Artist’s Gallery of the Carolinas, science fair partnerships, online science worksheets, sensory days, group rates, birthday parties and a homeschool program. To learn more about the programs, visit the  WonderWorks Myrtle Beach website.

To get more information about Teacher Appreciation Month, visit WonderWorks Teacher Appreciation.

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach has COVID-19 safety measures in place. They include reduced hours, enhanced cleaning, spatial distancing protocols, employee health screenings and employee personal protective equipment (PPE). 

About WonderWorks

WonderWorks, a science-focused indoor amusement park, combines education and entertainment. With over 100 hands-on exhibits, there is something unique and challenging for guests of all ages. Feel the power of 84-mph hurricane-force winds in the Hurricane Shack. Make huge, life-sized bubbles in the Bubble Lab. Get the NASA treatment in our Astronaut Training Gyro and experience zero gravity. Nail it by lying on the death-defying Bed of Nails. Conquer your fear of heights on our indoor Glow-In-The-Dark Ropes Course. WonderWorks is open 365 days a year and hosts birthday parties and special events.

remote learning illustration by Kaelen Felix

Remote Learning Tips for Parents

While remote learning can negatively impact motivation, engagement, and curiosity, there are ways to help stressed out students.

Emily Greene suggests 5 things that parents can proactively do at home to help their kids better manage the challenges of the disruption to schooling, and for some, the partial return to in-person learning.

As she writes in her book, “School, Disrupted”, parents can help to uplift and inspire their kids by trying these things, which in turn will also help teachers!

1) Make sure your child has free time/down time every day. This is necessary to activate an important brain network called the Default Mode Network (DMN). Scientists know that the DMN is intricately tied to curiosity, creativity, and imagination which can help boost engagement and motivation in these challenging times.

2) Curate their curiosity. Asking questions stimulates curiosity, which is directly tied to engagement and joy in learning.  Parents can help jostle our children out of the “circle the correct choice” mindset and make way for open-ended questions that are vital to learning. As parents, we can be too quick to provide advice, opinions, and answers. To foster curiosity, try to hold back, ask questions, and listen. In an article for the Harvard Educational Review, Susan Engel of Williams College argues for the promotion of curiosity in schools, calling for a “shift in the way we see the traditional role of a teacher from one who answers questions to one who elicits them.”  Let this be your guiding principle–eliciting questions will uncover a treasure trove of curiosity.

3) Encourage kids to get hands-on. Ask them what they want to create, make, or build. Doing activities that are off the computer and are hands-on engage them in learning in new ways. Other ways to get hands-on are to go outside. Or, take a virtual field trip!

4) As parents, we can also help teachers come up with ideas to integrate more fun and engagement into Zoom-based lessons. Teachers have a tough job right now trying to engage both in-person and remote learners. Sharing Zoom Boosters, (found in Emily’s book) shows that you care and are engaged in being part of the solution.

5) Encourage your child to get creative with their assignments–for example, by self-advocating for choice in projects. If the teacher plans to give a multiple-choice unit test, urge your child to ask if they can make a poster, a brochure, or a podcast covering the subject matter instead. If they are uninspired by the list of writing prompts for a class paper, encourage them to ask the teacher about selecting a personalized prompt that they are more excited to write about. When they are given an assignment, encourage them to ask the teacher, “Can I make a short film for my final? Can I write a short story? Can I put on a play? Can I build a contraption that would demonstrate this principle of physics?” The worst that can happen is the teacher says no—but more often than not, teachers appreciate the initiative because they know it shows a passion for learning during a very tough time due to the pandemic.

Emily Greene (www.emilygreene.com) is author of School, Disrupted: Rediscovering the Joy of Learning in a Pandemic-Stricken World in which she shares her experience educating her children inside and outside of traditional schools. She developed the Kiddovate program, working with hundreds of teachers and students. She also is cofounder of VIVA Creative, where she and her team create live and digital experiences. When the pandemic shut down the event industry, Greene co-led VIVA in rethinking how to bring people together in a global pandemic. In 2020, she received an Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year® award recognizing innovation during adversity.