Posts tagged with "tattoo art"

for use by 360 Magazine

ALLISON PONTHIER – LATE BLOOMER

ALLISON PONTHIER’S NEW SINGLE, “LATE BLOOMER,” IS OUT TODAY

WATCH THE VISUALIZER HERE 

Fresh off a tour with Lord Huron, a festival performance at Austin City Limits, and the release of her debut EP, Faking My Own Death (Interscope Records), Allison Ponthier returns with a simmering, swampy anthem for those who need a little time to come to terms with their sexuality. While her debut single, “Cowboy,” dealt with the difficulties of coming out, “Late Bloomer” portrays the process as a joyful one. Listen HERE.

“‘Late Bloomer’ is about how much fun coming out is. A lot of people describe it as going through a second puberty. You learn a lot about yourself,” explains Allison Ponthier. “That’s why when people come out, they often change how they look aesthetically. They try new things and make new friends. ‘Late Bloomer’ is really about celebrating that. It’s about the reward you get for finally being brave enough to be yourself. There’s no rush. There will always be people there who are ready for you whenever you’re ready.”

The 25-year-old Texas-born, Brooklyn-based artist wrote “Late Bloomer” with Ethan Gruska (Phoebe Bridgers, Trombone Shorty) and Dan Wilson (Adele, Leon Bridges), who also produced the song. The accompanying visualizer, which takes its inspiration from Little Shop of Horrors and “as-seen-on-TV” marketing, introduces a Muppet-like “late bloomer” plant, skilled at skateboarding, karaoke, tattoo art and more. View HERE.

“It’s basically just about being a bad boy, which I always wish I was,” she confesses.

Ponthier and Lord Huron are featured in the first video installment of Consequence of Sound’s new series, “Two for the Road,” which features conversations with artists who are touring together. View HERE. Check out their recent collaboration, “I Lied,” HERETipping Ponthier as one of the “Artists Guaranteed to Turn Heads at ACL Fest,” The Austin Chronicle said, “The touches of pop linger in a swaying haze that cabarets her country-leaning melodies, resulting in the kind of surreal Western pop that swells the sense of dislocation and uncertainty while beckoning warmly to follow.”

Growing up as a wide-eyed misfit in the Lone Star State, Ponthier dreamed of running away to New York City. When she made the move to Brooklyn at age 20, she felt out-of-place in a new way – like a goody-two-shoes Southerner in the epicenter of East Coast hipsterdom. The corresponding internal journey has inspired the string of reflective, idiosyncratic yet relatable songs found on Faking My Own Death, hailed as “stellar” by NME.