Posts tagged with "greenhouse gases"

Miami Florida illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Clean Cities Clean Future campaign

Investing in Digital Twins can prevent US cities from under-reporting their carbon emissions.

Cities across the United States are underreporting their carbon emissions by an average of 18.3% according to Nature Communications, the journal for research across the natural sciences.

It has reported huge discrepancies in measurement, with some cities under-reporting emissions by as much as 145.5%, and the total amount of potentially unreported carbon equating to 129 million metric tons. But, a Clean Cities – Clean Future campaign launched by leading Digital Twin provider Cityzenith has offered to help them address this.

Kevin Gurney of Northern Arizona University said the cities’ problem is not so much that they are deliberately under-reporting carbon emissions, but the fact that they simply do not have the technology to measure them.

Gurney and his team have developed ‘Vulcan’, an automated measurement system that can estimate fossil-fuel emissions at specific geographic points and across large areas.

The team compared Vulcan’s estimates of greenhouse gas emissions between 2010 and 2015 with those reported in 48 city inventories, which discovered that many US cities were not measuring their emissions accurately.

Gurney used measuring heating emissions as an example: “Heating oil statistics are difficult to get. Cities will often just not include the heating oil in their total building estimates.”

He added that cities are also using different methods to measure emissions from various sources, such as airborne, on-road, and marine:

“The analysis highlights the need for a systematic, consistent approach to accounting for carbon emissions across the US, because inaccurate estimates make it difficult to assess how effective emissions reduction efforts are.”

The World Economic Forum says cities are crucial for the journey to net-zero emissions. Despite only covering 3% of the Earth’s land surface, urban areas are responsible for more than 70% of global carbon emissions.

Emily Tan, City Solutions General Manager at Shell Renewable and Climate Solutions also called for a consistent approach to the problem: “Integrated solutions need to be innovated and delivered. This will require unprecedented collaboration between the government, industry, and society.

“But the urgency has never been greater. After all, making cities sustainable places to live and work for future generations will be imperative if the world is to meet the broader goals of the Paris Agreement and move closer to a net-zero emissions world.”

Cityzenith CEO Michael Jansen is adamant that the solution to effective measurement and management of carbon emissions within urban areas is Digital Twin technology:

“This report should be a real eye-opener to everyone working to address the 2016 Paris Agreement and push back against Climate Change.

“We already knew that urban emissions were by far the biggest contributor to the greenhouse gases, causing our world to heat up and threaten human life and prosperity, but it now seems that some of the parameters must change through this inadvertent under-reporting.

“Fortunately, Digital Twin 3D modelling through a powerful platform like our SmartWorldOS software can aggregate all new data, and then use AI to develop lasting solutions to the problems highlighted by Nature Communications and the Vulcan team.

“We are raising $15 million through Regulation A+ crowdfunding and as part of our Clean Cities – Clean Future’ campaign, we are donating our SmartWorldOS technology platform to one city at a time for every $1m raised to help create carbon neutral cities.

“And the great news is we have already raised more than $2 million from more than 1,000 new shareholders since launching our investment platform on our website at the end of last year, which will allow the first cities to benefit to be announced in the second quarter of 2021.”

Modest Carbon Tax

A recent MIT Sloan study found that a federal carbon price of $7 in 2020 could reduce emissions by the same amount as all of the flagship climate policies adopted by the Obama administration. In a paper released by the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR , Prof. Christopher Knittel models the carbon price needed to achieve projected emission reductions under Obama-era vehicle mileage standards, the Clean Power Plan, and a biofuel mandate.

“This shows the power of a price on carbon,” says Knittel, who is director of the CEEPR. “As little as a 7-cent price increase per gallon of gasoline and less than half a penny per kWh of electricity could get us the same climate benefits as the fragile, costly, and litigious regulations that represent President Obama’s climate legacy. And let’s not forget that all these regulations are under attack by the current administration.”

In his study, he found that matching the emissions reductions forecast under each regulation would not be enough to get the U.S. on a long-term path to decarbonation. However, a carbon tax that increases over time could reduce emissions by the same amount as all of those regulations combined.

“We’re still only looking at $22 per tonne in 2025 and $36 per tonne in 2030 if we include all major greenhouse gases,” explains Knittel. “If we get really serious about climate policy, the costs will only rise, and the cost-saving potential of carbon pricing will become even more important.”

As decision makers in the U.S. consider policy options to revitalize U.S. climate policy for 2020 and beyond, Knittel says that these results could be a political game changer. “This first effort to model the carbon tax equivalent of alternative climate regulations could help build a consensus around more cost-effective policies. Instead of trying to bring back earlier rules such as the Clean Power Plan, a new administration would do well to focus on one of the many carbon tax proposals introduced on Capitol Hill by both sides of the political aisle.”

He adds, “If we can make a given climate outcome more affordable, then we can also aim higher sooner. And we know that, under all scenarios, we have to drastically increase our efforts to meet the climate challenge.” Knittel is the author of “Diary of a Wimpy Carbon Tax: Carbon Taxes as Federal Climate Policy.” MIT Sloan School of Management is where smart, independent leaders come together to solve problems, create new organizations, and improve the world. Learn more at mitsloan.mit.edu.