Posts tagged with "Art Smith"

Flower created by Allison Christensen from 360 Magazine use by 360 Magazine

Harmony × Jewelry

Craft in America, the Peabody Award-winning series that explores America’s creative spirit through the language and traditions of the handmade announces two new episodes. Harmony bridges the art forms of music and craft, celebrating the joy of music and the creation of handcrafted instruments. Jewelry explores the history, artistry, and impact of personal adornment.

Harmony features accordion maker Marc Savoy and the Savoy family; bow maker Susan Lipkins; luthier Doug Naselroad and the Appalachian Artisan Center Culture of Recovery program; and artist Richard Jolley, whose monumental glass sculpture inspired the commission of a violin concerto. In Hindman, Kentucky master luthier Doug Naselroad leads the Appalachian Artisan Center Culture of Recovery program, which teaches musical instrument making to people in recovery from opioid addiction and other substance abuse.

The program teaches students how to make the mountain dulcimer. Using woods from the region, it seeks to revive the local economy as well as support its students on their road to recovery. Many of the graduates go on to become luthiers themselves or apply their new knowledge to other occupations – a testament to the healing power of craft. Jewelry features classic jeweler Tom Herman; artist Harriete Estel Berman who creates jewelry using recycled materials; the co-editors of Ornament Magazine; the legacy of modernist jeweler Art Smith; nature-inspired artist Gabrielle Gould; and Navajo/Hopi master jeweler, Jesse Monongya.

We explore the legacy of Art Smith, whose avant-garde creations redefined the boundaries of modernism from 1946 to the early 70s. Smith ran his jewelry studio in the heart of Greenwich Village. He designed for some of this country’s most prominent African American creatives including James Baldwin, Lena Horne, and Harry Belafonte. His story is brought to life with the help of artist Joyce J. Scott, photographer Michael Fields, art historian Leslie King-Hammond, and curator Joanne Hyppolite from the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

We visit the studio of Harriete Estel Berman in San Mateo, California who explores women’s roles and environmental issues through her jewelry. She works with recycled materials to create thought-provoking works of art that challenge the values of our society. 360 Magazine is pleased to see how jewelry is created and crafted in America.

How cooks are helping end world hunger

Cooks Who Feed is giving people a simple way to take on world hunger this holiday season.

Everyone has food waste, even if we try to be mindful about our purchases and how much we are preparing. While we may all account for a little here and there, it adds up to a lot of wasted food. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s estimated that 30-40 percent of our nation’s food supply is wasted. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization estimates that over 800 million people per year around the world do not have enough to eat. One organization, Cooks Who Feed, is taking on the mission of helping to feed the people who need it most.

“When I realized the facts surrounding food waste and world hunger, I felt I had to do something about it,” explains Seema Sanghavi, founder of the organization Cooks Who Feed. “We help make it easier to get involved in helping to end world hunger. One of our aprons will top the list of many gift buyers this season.”

The Cooks Who Feed organization has teamed up with well-known chefs to create a line of aprons that people can purchase. Every apron purchased provides 100 meals to those in need. The organization has addressed numerous areas of concern by working with charitable organizations around the globe that collect surplus food to provide immediate hunger relief.  

The mission is helping to end world hunger, but the company is also addressing the environmental impact of food waste. The organization works with three charities that obtain food surplus and provide it to those in need. The charities they work with are Rescuing Leftover Cuisine, Second Harvest, and Zomato Feeding India. Over a third of Cooks Who Feed profits go to supporting their charity partners.

Beyond the food benefits that the apron sales provide, they also help to support underprivileged women in India. The aprons are all made in a fair-trade facility, giving the women a way to earn a living and rise above poverty so they can feed their families and help others. All of the aprons are environmentally friendly, handcrafted with natural and recycled fabrics. A lot of details have gone into each apron creating a stylish, functional and eco-friendly product that brings sustainable fashion to the kitchen. 

Each of the organization’s celebrity chef ambassadors have created their own apron so their fans can purchase an apron designed by the chef. People can choose the one that suits them or the person they are gifting it to. Some of the celebrity chefs that have teamed up with Cooks Who Feed include:

  • Art Smith – Chef Art is an award-winning chef and co-owner of several restaurants, including Blue Door Kitchen & Garden, Art and Soul, and Southern Art and Bourbon Bar. He also spent 10 years being the personal chef of Oprah Winfrey. He’s known for his Southern fried chicken. Every purchase of his specially designed apron also supports Common Threads, which provides disadvantaged children free cooking and nutrition lessons.
  • Christine Cushing – An award-winning chef, Chef Christine is a judge on the hit Food Network program called Wall of Chefs, and won the 2020 Taste Award for “Best Chef” in a TV series for her food, travel documentary series called “Confucius Was a Foodie.” She also has an artisan line of tomato sauces.
  • Romain Avril – Best known for his appearance as a judge on Top Chef Canada All-Stars, Chef Romain has worked at a one and two Michelin star restaurant. He’s a star chef at such restaurants as Colborne Lane, Origin North Bar, and La Société Bistro. 
  • Devan Rajkumar – After several years of high-end catering with the Food Dudes, Chef Romain moved into an executive chef role at Luxe Appliance Studio.
  • Gaggan Anand – Known for his progressive Indian cuisine, Chef Gaggan has repeatedly placed on the Restaurants of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. He earned two Michelin stars in the first edition of the Thailand Michelin guide in 2018. He opened the restaurant Gaggan Anand in Bangkok in 2019, and has been profiled in Netflix’s Chef’s Table.

“The greatest lesson in life is taught by our family, simply share our food,” added Chef Art Smith. “By being a part of this great program I’m living that lesson, because every apron purchase shares food with the world. It’s a great feeling to be a part of doing that.”

Cooks Who Feed was founded by Seema Sanghavi. She loves cooking and got the idea for the organization after visiting a nongovernmental organization in India, where women were earning a living by performing safe work. Two years later, she came across information about the food waste problem, and an idea was formed. The mission of the organization is to create a movement, providing 1 million meals per year, which would be made possible by 10,000 apron sales annually. 

The Cooks Who Feed aprons come in a variety of colors and styles and start at $55, with free shipping within the U.S. In addition to the celebrity chef aprons, there are others to choose from. The aprons make great gifts for those who enjoy cooking. To get more information about the program or see the selection of aprons, visit the site: https://cookswhofeed.com/.

About Cooks Who Feed

Cooks Who Feed sells a line of fashionable aprons that have been sustainably made and help to feed the world. Working with charities that obtain surplus food, and providing it to the people who need it, the company helps people and the planet. The aprons are handcrafted, eco-friendly, and available online, for retail and for wholesale. To get more information, visit the site: https://cookswhofeed.com/.

Allison Christensen Illustrated a Food Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Cooks Who Feed

Food waste adds up. Whether we’re leaving our plates uncleaned, cooking too much or letting food expire on our watch, it can add up to quite a bit of waste.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that 30 to 40% of America’s food supply is wasted while the World Health Organization estimates that more than 800 million people around the world do not have access to a sufficient supply of food.

Cooks Who Feed, an organization that sells fashionable aprons, has taken it upon themselves to be the middle man in the collection of surplus food and delivery to those who need it.

Seema Sanghavi, the founder of Cooks Who Feed, said something had to be done about food waste and world hunger.

“We help make it easier to get involved in helping to end world hunger,” Sanghavi said. “One of our aprons will top the list of many gift buyers this season.”

Cooks Who Feed teamed up with renowned chefs to design aprons that help spread food to parts of the world where it’s needed.

Working with charitable organizations that collect extra food available to donate, Cooks Who Feed is able to provide 100 meals to those in need for each apron purchased.

The company also looks to address the environmental impact of wasted food. Over a third of its profits go to partnered charities, like Rescuing Leftover Cuisine, Second Harvest and Zamato Feeding India. The aprons are also environmentally friendly, made with natural and recycled fabrics, combining sustainable with fashionable in the kitchen.

On top of providing meals and environmental help, they also support underprivileged women in India. All aprons are made in a fair-trade facility, which provides the women with jobs to earn a living and feed their families.

They’ve also partnered with celebrity chefs that make the perfect gift for fans and loved ones.

The first chef they partnered with is Art Smith, an award-winning chef and co-owner of restaurants like Blue Door Kitchen & Garden, Art and Soul and Southern Art and Bourbon Bar. He was Oprah Winfrey’s personal chef for ten years and is known for his fried chicken.

Christine Cushing is also a decorated chef and a judge on Food Network’s Wall of Chefs. She won the 2020 Taste Award for “Best Chef” in a television series for her food and travel documentary titled “Confucius Was a Foodie.”

Romain Avril was a judge on Top Chef Canada All-Stars and has worked at a one and two Michelin star restaurant. He has worked at restaurants like Colborne Lane, Origin North Bar and La Société Bistro.

Devan Rajkumar is an executive chef at Luxe Appliance Studio after several years with the Food Dudes, a high-end catering service.

Gaggan Anand is known for his progressive Indian cuisine and has placed on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. He earned two Michelin stars in 2018 and opened a restaurant in Bangkok in 2019. He was also profiled on Netflix’s Chef’s Table.

Art Smith said we learn our greatest lesson from our family: share our food.

“By being a part of this great program I’m living that lesson, because every apron purchase shares food with the world. It’s a great feeling to be a part of doing that,” Smith said.

The aprons start at $55 and ship for free in the United States.

To learn more about the aprons or to order one, you can click right here.