Posts tagged with "CO2"

Aventador illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Direzione Cor Tauri

Lamborghini announces its roadmap for electrification: “Direzione Cor Tauri”

A landmark transformation plan for Lamborghini’s sustainability path: from product electrification to the Sant’Agata Bolognese site

  • Top product performance: the absolute priority throughout the entire electrification program
  • Roadmap incorporates celebration of the combustion engine and the range’s hybrid transition by 2024
  • Internal target defined: 50% less product CO2 emissions by the beginning of 2025
  • The largest investment in Lamborghini’s history: more than 1.5 billion euros over four years
  • Vision of a fourth fully electric model in the second part of the decade

Stephan Winkelmann, President and CEO of Automobili Lamborghini, today presents “Direzione Cor Tauri” (Towards Cor Tauri): a roadmap to decarbonization of future Lamborghini models and of the Sant’Agata Bolognese site based on a holistic approach to its environmental sustainability strategy. Throughout the product electrification process, Lamborghini will focus continually on identifying technologies and solutions that guaranteetop performance and driving dynamics in keeping with the marque’s tradition. In reference to the logo chosen by company founder Ferruccio Lamborghini in 1963, Cor Tauri is the brightest star in the Taurus constellation, and represents Lamborghini’s move towards a future that is electrified but always faithful to the heart and soul of the ‘bull’ brand.

Winkelmann commented: “Lamborghini’s electrification plan is a newly-plotted course, necessary in the context of a radically-changing world, where we want to make our contribution by continuing to reduce environmental impact through concrete projects. Our response is a plan with a 360-degree approach, encompassing our products and our Sant’Agata Bolognese location, taking us towards a more sustainable future while always remaining faithful to our DNA. Lamborghini has always been synonymous with preeminent technological expertise in building engines boasting extraordinary performance: this commitment will continue as an absolute priority of our innovation trajectory. Today’s promise, supported by the largest investment plan in the brand’s history, reinforces our deep dedication to not only our customers, but also to our fans, our people and their families, as well as to the territory where the company was born in Emilia-Romagna and to Made in Italy excellence.”

Cor Tauri, Lamborghini’s roadmap, will comprise of three phases:

  1. Celebrating the combustion engine (2021-2022) by presenting models paying tribute to the company’s recent period of continuous success. In the wake of steady sales growth and a seven-fold increase in turnover over the last fifteen years, Lamborghini has established itself as a center of excellence in the production of the best super sports cars. Unique design, technological innovation at the highest levels backed by huge investments in research and development, and the highest quality and craftsmanship are the basis for a pyramid of products: from the Urus Super SUV, the cornerstone of today’s success, rising to the pinnacle of technology and design masterpieces with the limited series. The most recently unveiled, the Sián, kicked off the electrification journey: the first Lamborghini featuring hybrid technology. This phase will be characterized by the development of combustion engines for versions that pay homage to the brand’s glorious history and iconic products past and present, but always under the impetus of the visionary spirit that distinguishes Lamborghini. Two new cars in the V12 model line-up will be announced in 2021.
  1. Hybrid transition (by the end of 2024): in 2023 Lamborghini will launch its first hybrid series production car, and by the end of 2024 the entire range will be electrified. Performance and the authentic Lamborghini driving experience will remain the focus of the company’s engineers and technicians in developing new technologies, and the application of lightweight carbon fiber materials will be crucial in compensating for weight due to electrification.  The company’s internal target for this phase is to reduce product CO2 emissions by 50% by the beginning of 2025.

Leading the hybrid transition will be an unprecedented investment: more than 1.5 billion euros allocated over four years, the largest in Lamborghini’s history. It is a tangible sign of the company’s strong sense of responsibility towards the need for a concrete response, through significant innovations, to the period of profound transformation that is affecting the whole automotive industry.

  1. First fully electric Lamborghini (second half of the decade): acceleration in the second part of the decade will be dedicated to full-electric vehicles, with the vision of a fourth model in the future. Once again, technological innovation in this phase will be oriented towards ensuring remarkable performance and positioning the new product at the top of its segment. This is how Lamborghini sees the culmination of this part of its journey: Cor Tauri, the brightest star in the constellation to which the company’s roadmap points, is represented by a fourth fully electric model.

Lamborghini’s program towards 2030 starts from a holistic vision of the company’s sustainability strategy: a 360-degree approach that spans product to the Sant’Agata Bolognese site, from the production lines to the offices. The 160,000 square-meter area achieved CO2 neutral certification in 2015, which was maintained even after the production site was doubled in size in recent years. In addition to reducing CO2 emissions, environmental protection, sustainability in the supply chain, attention to employees and corporate social responsibility are integral parts of this strategy.

The heart and compass of the Cor Tauri transformation plan is the brand’s DNA, and its innate ability to turn challenges into opportunities through continuous technological innovations, leading to improved performance and driving emotions but within the constraints imposed by the increasingly stringent CO2 regulations. A journey towards a new Lamborghini, but always faithful to itself and its roots.

Covid and health illustration

Environmental Effects × COVID-19

MIT Sloan School of Management study shows potential long-term environment effects from COVID-19 and the findings show a decrease in clean energy investment could exacerbate health crisis

While the COVID-19 pandemic has reduced air pollution in the U.S., the longer-term impact on the environment is unclear. In a recent study, MIT Sloan School of Management Prof. Christopher Knittel and Prof. Jing Li analyzed the short- and long-term effects, finding that the actual impact will depend on the policy response to the pandemic. Their study suggests that pushing back investments in renewable electricity generation by one year could outweigh the emission reductions and deaths avoided from March through June 2020.

“The pandemic raises two important questions related to the environment. First, what is the short-run impact on fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions? Second – and more important but harder to answer – what are the longer-term implications from the pandemic on those same variables? The health impacts from the pandemic could stretch out for decades if not centuries depending on the policy response,” says Knittel.

In their study, the researchers analyzed the short-term impact of the pandemic on CO2 emissions in the U.S. from late March to June 7, 2020. They found a 50% reduction in the use of jet fuel and a 30% reduction in the use of gasoline. The use of natural gas in residential and commercial buildings declined by almost 20% and overall electricity demand declined by less than 10%. However, the professors point out that the shutdown also halted most investment in the transition to low-carbon energy. In addition, clean energy jobs decreased by almost 600,000 by the end of April.

“The short-term impact of the pandemic is clear, but the long-term impact is highly uncertain,” says Li. “It will depend on how long it takes to bring the pandemic under control and how long any economic recession lasts.”

The best-case scenario, according to the researchers, is a swift and low-cost strategy to control the virus, allowing the economy to reopen by the end of 2020. In this scenario, investment trends prior to the pandemic will continue.

“Unfortunately, we view a second scenario as more likely,” notes Knittel. “In this scenario, the consequences of the pandemic will be greater, with many more deaths and deeper disruptions to supply chains, and a persistent global recession. The need to backpedal on the reopening of the economy due to flare-ups could destroy rather than defer the demand for goods and services.”

In this scenario, the delays in investments in renewables and vehicle fuel economy could lead to an additional 2,500 MMT of CO2 from 2020-2035, which could cause 40 deaths per month on average or 7,500 deaths during that time.

“Our findings suggest that even just pushing back all renewable electricity generation investments by one year would outweigh the emissions reductions and avoided deaths from March to June of 2020. However, the energy policy response to COVID-19 is the wild card that can change everything,” they wrote in an article for Joule.

Li explains that budgets will be strained to pay for the costs of the virus, making it challenging to invest in clean energy. And if a recession persists, there may be pressure to lessen climate change mitigation goals. However, stimulus packages could focus on clean energy, increasing clean air, clean jobs, and national security.

“Just stabilizing the economy can go a long way to putting clean energy trends back on track. We need to solve the pandemic and continue to address climate change. Otherwise, it will lead to even more tragedy,” adds Knittel.

Li and Knittel are coauthors of “The short-run and long-run effects of COVID-19 on energy and the environment” with Kenneth Gillingham and Marten Ovaere of Yale University and Mar Reguant of Northwestern University. Their paper was published in a June issue of Joule.